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Hey Orange,

Many builders have had good results ordering drywall from commercial building supply companies rather than the big box stores, especially when you factor in delivery and carrying the drywall up or down stairs into the theater area. The 25ga hat channel is not so common, be careful, many suppliers stock 20ga and will "upgrade" you to the 20ga "for free as a favor". The all-metal IB-1 sound isolation clip will deliver much of the performance of the higher priced clips. Many people purchase their Green Glue from the SoundProofing company, not because of price, but because of their customer support. Beware of substitutes for Green Glue, few have actual test data to support their claims.

Here is a chart comparing the performance of sound isolation clips:

 

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OK, so after a few more days of what feels like near constant reading an researching - I'm ready to pull the trigger and spend a few $. (by this I mean I've been sharing some ideas with my wife and she hasn't said no)

I'm now stuck deciding what materials and supplier to go with...hear me out. It feels like there's 10 out there, each promising their system or pricing to be the best
Quick reminder to make it worse probably.. any DIYer can’t register for a ProXtra account (pro desk account) at Home Depot. Any order totaling more than $1500 can get sent to the bid room for additional discounting...

The more you order, the more the discount typically. They’ll also do job site delivery. I just ordered 3/4 XPS foamular 150, and 3/4 subfloor to overlay my concrete basement, a boatload of tapcons, 2” foamular for the walls, plus adhesive and tape. Order was about $2400. Most stuff was regular or bulk prices posted, but I literally paid half for the tapcons after it bid out.

Good luck!
 

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I'm surprised there's not more conversation around this, or a standard way of doing it. It seems like it would be such a common issue in basements.

Wonder if mass loaded vinyl would be more effective than Dynamat?
I was kind of surprised too. Maybe we'll be the pioneers in hose shutoff access doors here. Lol.

I'm not sure about the efficacy of MLV vs Dynamat, but I do have a few sheets of Dynamat left from some earlier efforts at treating a few vents and problem areas. I will probably try to find a door that allows for a drywall finish on the outside to disguise it as well as get some mass, layer the inside with Dynamat, and add a foam gasket to try for a good seal. I'm hoping to get to drywall this spring, so I will be sure to post my solution when it happens.
 

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OK, so after a few more days of what feels like near constant reading an researching - I'm ready to pull the trigger and spend a few $. (by this I mean I've been sharing some ideas with my wife and she hasn't said no)

I'm now stuck deciding what materials and supplier to go with...hear me out. It feels like there's 10 out there, each promising their system or pricing to be the best.

Can I ask for this here? I want some guidance on which supplier and product to use?? My ceiling is 28 x 16 and then I have to do the walls(just shy of 8' high) and two doors. I want to follow best practice and do 2x 5/8 drywall boards with GG. This is going to cost me a ton after adding the Safe&sound and hat and channel.

For the Safe&Sound and 5/8 drywall I'll go to my local big box hardware store, that's easy, right?!?!.

Where it gets complicated is
- The 25 ga 7/8 furring channel, seems pretty standard, might just do big box store with coupons?
- What about the green glue? Where for best price?
- Who has the best bang for buck clips? Can anybody guide me to some current decent options for my requirements. I'm seeing Whisper clips and eb1 clips and resilient clips, and then there's different suppliers.

I want to do this right, but I am cost sensitive and don't just want to buy from the first supplier who sends me a quote or who has an online purchase option.

I'm really asking for help on my analysis paralysis wrt product/supplier. I've spent days now and my spreadsheet is starting to take shape but if I can save some time and simply go with general consensus, I'd be happier. :)

Any thoughts, pointers? even if you just PM them to me? I'm tired of googling searching and being indecisive on the best value for money option (TO THE ADMINS: I really hope I'm not overstepping the the line here, please let me know and I'll delete this post).
Well, first off accept the fact there's no one-stop shopping for this stuff. Sounds like you already know that, but I'm just reiterating.

My general recommendation is to visit a contractor drywall shop. There are four reasons for this:

  1. On large orders, you can negotiate prices
  2. Most will deliver, including inside delivery/place stuff wherever you want
  3. They can get most things you need
  4. Most have free delivery if you order above a certain threshold (which should be much lower than what you're going to need)
For instance, there is a shop near me from which I can order drywall, acoustic sealant (not Green Glue), PAC/RSIC clips, and hat channel. They will deliver it inside a home, wherever I want. That is as close to one-stop shopping as I have found.

As Mike mentioned above, you could go through Home Depot and leverage their Pro programs. Be warned though, in the past HD would only deliver curbside. It's been at least 2 years since I even considered their delivery service, so I don't know how it is today. They normally contract it out, whereas Lowes has employees and company owned vehicles make the deliveries. I'm telling you though, if you find a small contractor shop locally who wants your business more, the experience for you will be much smoother and easier.

Next, insulation. Call around to wholesalers until you find one you can talk into selling to you direct. Regardless of what they are supposed to do, I guarantee unless you live in a tiny town that you'll find at least one who will do business with you and set you up as a "contractor." This will get you access to the stuff you won't find at the big box stores, such as thicker varieties of Roxul for example.

Green Glue is kind of the wildcard of sorts. Do you value convenience of application (tubes), value (buy it in buckets and get an applicator/squirt gun), cost, or time? The cheapest option is normally to order from someone like the Sound Proofing Company (SPC). However, the downside is you'll usually wait longer (time), you must pay freight (not too bad though), and you'll need to get the squirt gun thingee (extra cost). The most convenient method is to order 12-packs of it from a retailer such as Amazon. You could also order the 12-pack tubes (29 oz. each) via SPC or another similar wholesale vendor.

IMHO, the GG situation usually boils down to 1) when you need it; and 2) whether you can realistically apply it all at once or not. If you're doing your walls and ceiling in stages, the tubes make more sense as you need to clean the applicator in between uses and it's just generally a P.I.T.A. for a typical homeowner unless you do it all at the same time. The tubes cost more by volume, but are much more convenient for most people doing this as DIY. If cost is a factor, the buckets are significantly cheaper, even after allowing for shipping costs. Like many other things, the more you buy at one time, the lower your average cost per bucket.

As far as the clips are concerned, you can find all kinds of opinions on this forum about which ones are "best." My personal opinion is the best ones for you are the ones that are
  1. Readily available
  2. Use rubber in their construction (or similar material)
  3. $6 or less per clip
  4. Design is conducive to your ability to apply them (e.g. shape, etc.)
The fact is folks are "splitting hairs" when it comes to judging which is best from an acoustic perspective. Clips are just one part of the equation. Your effort and focus on how important their performance is relative to all other clips should be commensurate with how much money and effort you are putting into everything else. If acoustic damping is a really big concern, I recommend going the route of using more clips and channels (as necessary to support the weight) and adding more drywall and Green Glue layers, rather than spending more $ on a marginally superior clip. That said, I suggest you avoid the clips that don't have any sort of rubber. The cheapo clips are not worthwhile IMHO (I'm talking about the $1.50 - $2 variety that are metal only).

p.s. Don't use Quiet Glue. Terrible product. Green Glue is popular for a (good) reason.
 

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Strong points by HT Geek for sure. HD will deliver into my garage where I am, but the reality is sheet goods like drywall and ply are a pain to move. I’ll hire out the Sheetrock work, so no biggie, but carrying lots of heavy things sucks... good to pay people for that... I paid a grand to a concrete pumping outfit to put a yard in my basement for a reason... carrying 85 bags of quickcrete and mixing 4 at a time wasn’t going to cut it, let alone the dust mess..
 

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Thanks @HT Geek and @jcr159.

Lowe's typically delivers into my garage with a forklift(three times in the past for various projects). Right now there's a gift card deal at dollar store for 20% off lowe's gift cards. I saw it on slickdeals and will try it out this weekend. If I can do that and get another 10% coupon somewhere random that makes it a 30% discount. I wonder if any other wholesaler can match that, I'm trying though? Sent a few quote requests around. It seems like unless you know for a fact that they sell a particular product you have to phone and ask. Their websites are generally not very detailed when it comes to these larger contracting places.


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Thanks @HT Geek and @jcr159.

Lowe's typically delivers into my garage with a forklift(three times in the past for various projects). Right now there's a gift card deal at dollar store for 20% off lowe's gift cards. I saw it on slickdeals and will try it out this weekend. If I can do that and get another 10% coupon somewhere random that makes it a 30% discount. I wonder if any other wholesaler can match that, I'm trying though? Sent a few quote requests around. It seems like unless you know for a fact that they sell a particular product you have to phone and ask. Their websites are generally not very detailed when it comes to these larger contracting places.


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Check out eBay for codes for Lowe's. Last I checked they were selling for a couple bucks for the codes. If youre a Slickdeals follower, I'm sure youre familiar with the now debunked Lowes generator. Some people sell those codes on eBay.

Good luck!
 

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Need advice for sound deadening with subwoofers between basement wood ceiling joists

In my basement I have an invisible 5.1 system with 3 small subwoofers hidden between the wood ceiling joists. There is very limited space between the joists, so I can only use very small subs. I have one "Artison Nano 1", one 8" "underseat" car sub, and one 10" underseat car sub. They sound very good and produce more than enough bass for the basement, but (as you can probably guess) -- having the subs surrounded by wood slats in the joists means there are frequencies where the surrounding wood vibrates and there is a lot of bleed-through to the floor above.

Would applying the 2mm think sound deadening material shown below to all the surrounding wood work? (it's a bit like Dynamat). Is there something better I should consider? Whatever I use, it needs to be dark black or brown in color.

Picture of 2mm thick Sound Deadening material:




Pictures of the subs between wood ceiling joists:




 

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What do people think about these mats for use under wall bottom plates rather than the rubber horse stall mats normally recommended?

https://www.harborfreight.com/4-piece-anti-fatigue-foam-mat-set-94635.html


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To my knowledge, there is no performance testing of any of these products in that role. Therefore, there is no real way to make a determination of what product will work better vs. another product. My understanding of the theory (though likely flawed) is that the lower the resonance point of the spring-mass system, the lower frequency isolation that can be achieved. It follows then, that a lower durometer/softer product should have a lower resonance point than a higher durometer/harder product, provided the material is not compressed beyond its working range.

Kinetics claims a STC drop of up to 10 points through a wall assembly due to flanking paths via the floor/ceiling joints if the wall is not properly isolated. To do it properly, however, requires isolation at every anchor point as well as between the top and bottom plates as you are planning.

Mike
 

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Check out eBay for codes for Lowe's. Last I checked they were selling for a couple bucks for the codes. If youre a Slickdeals follower, I'm sure youre familiar with the now debunked Lowes generator. Some people sell those codes on eBay.

Good luck!


I bought 2x $500 Lowe’s GCs at dollar general with 15% coupons and a 10% discount coupon, saved quite a bit, thank goodness.

Will be ordering my items from soundproofingcompany this week.

Been contemplating what I need to do for Doors. Exterior door with weather strips etc plus interior solid core door?? No frame will fit properly given the clips, channel and double drywall. Is my only option to make a custom build with 2 or 3 layers of MDF? Need to do more research here on the forum and I’ve seen some serious custom build, not sure if I need that unless its out of necessity


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I bought 2x $500 Lowe’s GCs at dollar general with 15% coupons and a 10% discount coupon, saved quite a bit, thank goodness.

Will be ordering my items from soundproofingcompany this week.

Been contemplating what I need to do for Doors. Exterior door with weather strips etc plus interior solid core door?? No frame will fit properly given the clips, channel and double drywall. Is my only option to make a custom build with 2 or 3 layers of MDF? Need to do more research here on the forum and I’ve seen some serious custom build, not sure if I need that unless its out of necessity


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I've been doing some research on doors lately as well. From some of it, I've read that exterior doors aren't necessarily better at sound proofing.

So far, I've found that Jeld-Wen Tria C series solid core doors are fairly decent with an STC of 37. Not the best but for the price pretty good.

Hopefully someone with much more knowledge can chime in on doors!
 

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Been contemplating what I need to do for Doors. Exterior door with weather strips etc plus interior solid core door?? No frame will fit properly given the clips, channel and double drywall. Is my only option to make a custom build with 2 or 3 layers of MDF? Need to do more research here on the forum and I’ve seen some serious custom build, not sure if I need that unless its out of necessity

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I've been discussing doors lately with Nyal Mellor and he has suggested buying the heaviest 1-3/4" solid core door slab I can find (typically mineral core doors have higher STC than wood cores), then adding a layer of 1/2-5/8" drywall topped with a 1/2-5/8" layer of MDF (with Green Glue between each layer, of course). Then add a good seal set such as the Pemko STCSET-2E. For my application, Nyal has recommended cam-lift hinges combined with the threshold seal rather than an automatic door bottom. We have not discussed latch sets or door closers as I recall, so I can't comment on those aspects of door construction.

Somewhere I came across the comment that the door frames should be constructed from the inside out for best acoustic performance, thus avoiding the use of shims and the necessary air gap these create. I took this to mean that you don't build a rough-in opening when you do your framing but instead build the structure as you install the door. Also, because our walls are thicker than standard walls, the first structural member attached to the door frame is an oversized 2x that is ripped to the finished width of the wall. For example a 2x4 wall with 2 layers of 5/8" drywall on each side with one side utilizing clips and channel would have a finished width of ( 5/8" + 5/8" + 3-1/2" + 1-5/8" + 5/8" + 5/8") 7-5/8". The first layer of the frame would be 3/4" pine or MDF backed by a 2x10 that is ripped to a width of 7-5/8" (some people like to use finger-jointed studs or engineered lumber such as LSL or LVL because it is straighter than typical 2x lumber). Then you would have additional jack studs and king studs for the strength desired. The drywall would then abut the face of the 2x10, rather than overlapping the stud and abutting against the back side of the pine or MDF frame.

Here is a link to BIGmouthinDC's drawing of what I described above and attached is a typical home door frame assembly.
 

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I've been discussing doors lately with Nyal Mellor and he has suggested buying the heaviest 1-3/4" solid core door slab I can find (typically mineral core doors have higher STC than wood cores), then adding a layer of 1/2-5/8" drywall topped with a 1/2-5/8" layer of MDF (with Green Glue between each layer, of course). Then add a good seal set such as the Pemko STCSET-2E. For my application, Nyal has recommended cam-lift hinges combined with the threshold seal rather than an automatic door bottom. We have not discussed latch sets or door closers as I recall, so I can't comment on those aspects of door construction.



Somewhere I came across the comment that the door frames should be constructed from the inside out for best acoustic performance, thus avoiding the use of shims and the necessary air gap these create. I took this to mean that you don't build a rough-in opening when you do your framing but instead build the structure as you install the door. Also, because our walls are thicker than standard walls, the first structural member attached to the door frame is an oversized 2x that is ripped to the finished width of the wall. For example a 2x4 wall with 2 layers of 5/8" drywall on each side with one side utilizing clips and channel would have a finished width of ( 5/8" + 5/8" + 3-1/2" + 1-5/8" + 5/8" + 5/8") 7-5/8". The first layer of the frame would be 3/4" pine or MDF backed by a 2x10 that is ripped to a width of 7-5/8" (some people like to use finger-jointed studs or engineered lumber such as LSL or LVL because it is straighter than typical 2x lumber). Then you would have additional jack studs and king studs for the strength desired. The drywall would then abut the face of the 2x10, rather than overlapping the stud and abutting against the back side of the pine or MDF frame.



Here is a link to BIGmouthinDC's drawing of what I described above and attached is a typical home door frame assembly.


Thanks @mhutchins, even the perceivable simple things become complicated when trying to do it right. This is the answer I was looking for though, thanks. As with everything it’s a trade off between cost-time-effort-results.


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I am in the flight path of an Air Force base. Even though they are so high in the air that you can barely see them they are extremely loud. I know I can't eliminate the sound, but I want to reduce it to a tolerable level for me. I also have a home theater and I want to keep the sound from disturbing my neighbors. I'm researching soundproofing my house and I need some advice.

I am able to hear my windows transmit the most noise so I am going to replace them first. I am in the process of getting quotes to install Milgard Quiet line windows. After the windows are replaced I'm sure the drywall will be the next weak link. I am predicting I will need to add another layer of drywall later (after I save enough money).

Now for my first question, are there any considerations I should consider when installing the windows to make a second layer of drywall installation easier at a later date? Or is there anything else I should consider? Now my last question, I remember seeing instructions somewhere on how to install and soundproof a window, can anyone provide me the link? I want to know how the installer needs to install the windows.

I apologize if this has been asked before.

Thank you in advance!
 

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Hi guys! Looking for a little bit of direction. Long story short, need some help reducing sound in the basement from 1st floor. Upstairs we put some area rugs and added more furniture which definitely helped but looking to spend some money and reduce impact noise (even airborne noise is bad honestly.)


Current setup on basement ceiling is some insulation bags (not completely covering the ceiling area) and a suspension ceiling with regular lightweight tiles, pictures attached. Just fyi I bought the place like this. I've done quite a bit of research and torn between what type of drywall to put up. Two 5/8 with GG in between with resilient channels or CertainTeed silentFX 5/8 and resilient channels? Either way I figured I'd add more insulation. Approximately 500 sq feet needs to be done.



Talked to two general contractors so far. One recommended just adding rockwall insulation and sheetrock vinyl ceiling tiles to retain the original drop ceiling. The other said to add Thermafiber insulation and see how it is and go from there. I don't mind spending some money on drywall install and lose an inch or so in the ceiling height. I just need to reduce the noise coming from the first floor. Let me know if you'd like more pictures. Thanks so much!
 

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I would do 2 layers of Type-X 5/8" drywall with Green Glue between the joists, up against the bottom of the flooring. Then fill the joist cavities nearly full with inexpensive insulation batts. Install clips and channel to the bottom of the joists and install two layers of Type-X 5/8" drywall with Green Glue to the hat channel. Stagger all the seams and caulk all the corner intersections between the ceiling and the walls.

Other than adding more layers of drywall, that is about the best you can do.

Mike
 
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