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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm currently finishing my basement. Attached is the floorplan. Attachment 129062


I've done research on sound control, and want to keep noise from the basement from being too disturbing to those upstairs.


I had a plan to do double drywall ceiling with green glue and unfaced R-19 insulation between the joists. This would only be above the theater/pool table area though. I'm not too concerned with noise traveling to other rooms downstairs, although I'll probably stuff the walls with unfaced R-11 between the rooms. I'd like to keep the area above the bedroom quiet though - as it is another bedroom.


My concerns are related to the "openness" of the floorplan. Will I be able to significantly reduce noise for those upstairs? Should I consider doing double drywall/green glue on the walls to the adjoining rooms too? What about the clips to decouple drywall from the studs - is that overkill considering my layout?


Thanks!
 

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If you only do the ceiling over one area, then sound will get upstairs by leaking through where the ceiling wasn't done, ie over gym section.

Might wanna do the ceiling + inside walls of the theater space.
 

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Not sure what the NRC of the double drywall plus GG is but I read this on the Cellume website.


"Ceilume Smart Ceiling Tiles have not been designed to function as acoustical tiles, but they will improve a room's acoustics. A normal sheet rock ceiling has an NRC (Noise Reduction Coefficient) rating of around 5%, meaning that 5% of the sound coming in contact with it is absorbed and about 95% is reflected. Our ceiling tiles by themselves have an NRC of 25% to 30%, so they absorb 5 to 6 times as much sound as sheet rock. For grid mount installations, our AcoustoTherm Backpanels help increase the ratings to about 35% to 45% depending on the style. Please see our Test Data Sheet for the NRC ratings for specific ceiling tiles."


Added advantages to thier tiles is a better looking ceiling (IMO) and the ability to access behind it.
 

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read the articles and test data for alternative ceiling and wall assemblies at www.soundproofingcompany.com if you have any questions Ted hangs out here all the time and is more than happy to offer suggestions.


Bottom line doing just the ceiling will help but probably not get the overall result you desire. read about flanking paths in Ted's articles.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TedO /forum/post/15505401


Not sure what the NRC of the double drywall plus GG is but I read this on the Cellume website.

I was considering these for my originally planned drop ceiling. While they may have a higher NRC than just drywall they definitely will not stand up to DD+GG. I spoke at length with Ted about this and he said that the sound would leak straight through that drop ceiling. I was considering doing just the opposite of OP, with DD+GG on just the walls with the drop. In the end, I opted for DD+GG on walls and ceiling because I was very concerned about the sound traveling upstairs. While my HT is not yet finished completely, I can report that we can crank up a movie and not disturb the kids.
 

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Doors are flanking paths, and a distraction on your screenwall and may interfere with speaker placement or future screen enlargements. I'd move the bedroom door to the being accessed by the exercise room, and reduce the double door to a single one.


How do you get to your furnace? Is that storage in the room south of the exercise room? Why not just tack the utility space in with that? Also, check to see if your furnace or HW heater need a certain volume of cubic space for combustible air, or you will need to add some kind of supply or louvered doors or the likel.
 

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Well I have the same concerns about sound traveling to the upper floors, but I still want access to the vents, pipes and such in the ceiling. With drywall it's pretty much blocked off. I do like the look of the Ceilume tiles. Any sugestions?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TedO /forum/post/15508199


but I still want access to the vents, pipes and such in the ceiling.

The exact same thing has been said by many who have passed this way. The bottom line is when you drive down the street and look at all those 2 story homes, how many of them do you think have drywalled first floor ceilings and walls totally hiding the vents pipes and such going up to the second floor?


If lack of access was a problem you would see a lot of homes built with first floor suspended ceilings. I can't recall ever seeing ONE.


Now if you have shut off valves you need to have some access hatches, but that is not a big problem.
 

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Big,


I have two water valves for the outside spigots (at least they are near the exterior walls) that need to be opened and closed twice a year. My house is also a two story, and I have dampers in the ductwork in the basement that redirects the flow of air to each room that I adjust twice a year. This makes a HUGE difference in how well the house is heated and cooled (1st floor vs 2nd floor). In the summer I force most of the air to the 2nd story and most of it to the 1st floor in the winter. These are located along the main duct running down the middle if the basement. At $200 apiece, it would be expensive to replace these with motorized dampers. The timer for the outside outlets and the transformer for the doorbell could always be relocated but that’s extra work also. Drywall would be easier and cheaper but I don’t think it’s the best thing in my case. Maybe a combination of both, I can drywall ( or use OSB board) the ceiling leaving openings for all access points, then put a drop ceiling in over that. I can add sound proof batting above the tiles that cover the access holes.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bsampson /forum/post/15504051


've done research on sound control, and want to keep noise from the basement from being too disturbing to those upstairs.


I had a plan to do double drywall ceiling with green glue and unfaced R-19 insulation between the joists. This would only be above the theater/pool table area though. I'm not too concerned with noise traveling to other rooms downstairs, although I'll probably stuff the walls with unfaced R-11 between the rooms. I'd like to keep the area above the bedroom quiet though - as it is another bedroom.


My concerns are related to the "openness" of the floorplan. Will I be able to significantly reduce noise for those upstairs? Should I consider doing double drywall/green glue on the walls to the adjoining rooms too? What about the clips to decouple drywall from the studs - is that overkill considering my layout?


Thanks!

You'll get a small amount of transfer reduction simply by increasing the mass over the theater, but I don't think it will be enough to make it worthwhile. That's the thing with soundproofing: it's only as good as the weakest link, so unless you take a thorough approach there's little point in starting. Now, if you did a couple layers of 5/8" sheet rock + GG and insulation all the way around *and* addressed the flanking paths you could get 35-40dB of reduction if I'm remembering right.


Frank
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the replies.


I do prefer drop ceiling appearance and accessiblity as well, but I think I'm going to go with drywall.


Soundproofingcompany.com is an excellent resource. I'd read some on it before, and now I've read a little more. I'm now thinking I will go with double drywall, green glue (1 or 2 tubes / per 4x8), R19, and possibly RSIC/Furring channels on the entire ceiling of the 'north' section of the basement. I'm also thinking about doing the same to the bedroom wall and office wall (except R11).


This leaves the main 2x6 structural wall that goes the full lenth of the basement. There is a 6' opening towards the left side of the drawing. Is noise flanking around this corner going to make soundproofing that wall a waste of effort? Also, the double doors are going to be french doors (my wife is pretty much set of this) - probably the worst kind for passing noise...


Pilgrim - I wasn't even asking for floorplan changes, but you've given me some things to think about
. There will be a pocket door to access the furnace room. I'll also put some vents to allow appropiate airflow, but you're right, I might be better off just connecting it to the storage area to the south. Moving the bedroom door to the exercise area would also make a more direct path to the bathroom. Cutting a doorway that direction would mean putting another opening/header in a structural wall, but that isn't too big of a deal.
 
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