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Just wanted to see if anyone could help out with my experience. I wanted to try PC gaming on my Hitachi 51 RPTV. I have the ATI 9800 all in wonder installed so I plugged in the red component adapter into the video out on the card. When I attempted to plug in the component cables from the TV into the adapter I heard a pop and saw flash come from the back of the TV! I'm sure it's not a shock to some of you the input I was using is fried. I thought the problem might have been that the TV and PC were both powered on when I did this so I thought I'd give it another go with input # 2. Don't worry the TV is under Circuit City warrenty anyways so what the hell. So I turned off the TV and unplugged the PC. Now everything is hooked up and I turned the TV on. Ok...nothing blowing up, Let's try plugging PC power in... wooooow - nevermind! As soon as I plugged the power cable into the back of the PC the lights dimmed and a loud buzzing occured!?! Also when i try to connect the cable (coax tv cable) to the back of the computer (ATI tuner card) it sparks like crazy. Everything is hooked up correctly and everything works fine by itself. It only occurs when I try connecting soemthing to the PC - weather its the receiver, tv, or cable. Now i'm pretty sure it has something to do with the electrical in this old apartment building i live in because i've had the cable (tv) connected to this same machine at my parents house with no problem. Others have suggested it maybe because the tv, receiver, cable have different ground points than the computer does. Does anyone have any ideas on how to fix this? Any suggestions would help.
 

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Hi! Don't try plugging in anything else to your PC yet and you might want to repost your problem in the HTPC forum and also mention if this is a store-bought or homebuilt machine. On item number #2 about not worrying- well, you should worry about getting nasty shock (that's happened to me while repairing PC's before).
 

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Get one of those 3 light circuit testers and check your outlets. It sounds like one of them is wired wrong.


Deann,


Were you playing inside a power supply? I can't imagine how you'd get a shock inside a PC otherwise. All the wires outside a power supply except maybe the switch leads are 12V or less.
 

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Nope- I wasn't inside the power supply. It was by the mouse port. The PC was open, plugged in and powered off. My fingers were tingly for a couple of days afterwards.


[edit 'cause I just remembered this]

But the power supply actually wasn't mounted right (it was wedged in with styrofoam instead of screwed in, not one of my builds) as it wasn't the right type for that machine. And I just remembered we could shut it off by touching the internal housing (metal parts) with the tip of a screwdriver.
 

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Deeann, it sounds like there is a voltage between the computer's ground and the other ground. Unplug everything and (using a three-prong extension cord for convenience) test with a 120-volt tester between the two receptacles in use.


There should be no voltage between the two grounds (but it sounds like there is). There should be almost no voltage between the two neutrals (the wider slots), and almost no voltage between either neutral and either ground.


There should be 120 volts between either hot (narrow slot) and any neutral and any ground, and either almost no voltage or 240 volts between the two hots. If all of these check out, the problem is in the equipment. Let us know.
 

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Somewhere there is a miswiring, and you are causing a short circuit of 120 volt power. You will need to do troubleshooting with a voltmeter to find out whether the problem is in the house electric wiring, in one of the power cords, in the PC, or in the TV. You really should not connect anything up until you find the problem.


If a portion of the house wiring has the ground hole of the outlet hot instead of grounded (severe wiring error), anything wiht a 3 prong plug plugged into that outlet can be hazardous to touch.


Neither flat prong of the three prong power plug should be "grounded to the ground prong" within the TV or PC or VCR or any appliance. Normally RCA jack shells are grounded to the chassis which in turn is grounded via the power cord ground prong.


There are still some old electronic equipment with two prong plugs where one "side of the line" corresponding to one of the plug prongs is connected to the chassis. On such equipment no metal parts or screws attached to the chassis should be exposed even on the bottom, and jack shells should not be connected to the chassis. Homemade additions may violate this rule and a shock and short hazard will result if such equipment is connected via an RCA cable to modern equipment with three prong plugs, etc.


Video hints:
http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Larry Fine
Deeann, it sounds like there is a voltage between the computer's ground and the other ground.
Hi Larry! It's bsmoore who's having the trouble (the PC I was talking about at work was torn down for parts years ago). And the problem was in the PC itself as we were working on it on the clean (tech services) table and were still having trouble. I was just letting bsmoore know about the possibility of getting an unwelcome surprise.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by deeann
Hi Larry! It's bsmoore who's having the trouble.
Oops! My bad! :rolleyes:
 
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