AVS Forum banner
1 - 20 of 77 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious as I have a new set of Def Tech 7006's as well as the 2002 center and BP2X surrounds.


Even in the Def Tech manual it mentions a 40-60 "break-in" period. Just curious if this is really noticeable and what I can expect after break-in.


I think they sound great already but would love to hear them sound even better (especially a tad smoother highs and warmer mids). Will breaking-in help that?


What should I be listening for?


Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
865 Posts
Not nearly as important as cable break-in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by mziegler /forum/post/0


Not nearly as important as cable break-in.

Oh, don't worry about that...just be sure you get the input side of the cable attached to the output device and visa versa!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Uh oh...




Did not realize I was opening up a big can of worms here. Sorry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by atdamico /forum/post/0


If you did a search you will realize what you may have started! It could be all out war.

I must not be using the search function correctly becasue I tried different combinations of "Speaker Break In" and did not find much. Whoops!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
Its real, and you will find some, if not all speaker designers/engineers recommend break-in time for optimal performance. I for one, would tend to think that the engineer of the speaker knows better than myself. And I personally have had many different speaker setups and have noticed a difference in each and every one. Dont worry about the ones who want "proof", because it CAN be measured, albeit very very slightly, but is VERY noticeable to you. When your speakers have properly broken in, you will notice they become fuller sounding, quicker to respond, and all around performance wise...........better.




here we go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spooky /forum/post/0


Just curious as I have a new set of Def Tech 7006's as well as the 2002 center and BP2X surrounds.


Even in the Def Tech manual it mentions a 40-60 "break-in" period. Just curious if this is really noticeable and what I can expect after break-in.


I think they sound great already but would love to hear them sound even better (especially a tad smoother highs and warmer mids). Will breaking-in help that?


What should I be listening for?


Thanks!

First I'm not a big fan of definitive tech, at least for music. I'm afraid those highs you hear is the Defintive tech sound and will not smooth out but YOU may very well get more used to them. If there's a return policy on them use it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,247 Posts
Why, they'll be so quick to respond, they'll become psychic and anticipate the signal before it gets there!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,503 Posts
Does it really matter if break-in is real or not? If it is, then they will get broken in through normal use. Meanwhile, you can be enjoying them.

(Note: I like Def Tech speakers, but some people do consider them harsh in the treble.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,247 Posts

Quote:
Does it really matter if break-in is real or not?

If there is substantial evidence to support that the actual breakin occurs in the first few moments of playing, certainly there is. Otherwise, manufacturers will simply state the speakers need 50, 100, 400, or whatever hours. The practical and very real effect is that you keep the speakers in your room longer which can do a couple of things. 1) It increases the likelihood that you'll keep them. 2) It gives you longer to get used to a speaker that is patently deficient as a reproducer of sound.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chu Gai /forum/post/0


If there is substantial evidence to support that the actual breakin occurs in the first few moments of playing, certainly there is. Otherwise, manufacturers will simply state the speakers need 50, 100, 400, or whatever hours. The practical and very real effect is that you keep the speakers in your room longer which can do a couple of things. 1) It increases the likelihood that you'll keep them. 2) It gives you longer to get used to a speaker that is patently deficient as a reproducer of sound.


sounds like you're a glass half empty guy huh chu
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
287 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spooky /forum/post/0


I think they sound great already but would love to hear them sound even better (especially a tad smoother highs and warmer mids). Will breaking-in help that?

Break in period or not, that's kinda the "Definitive sound." I wouldn't expect it to change much. Not to bash DT at all, but I sold mine because of that tonality -- it just didn't work for me. Went warmer and smoother with Vandersteen. Just my experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by crackyflipside /forum/post/0


Speaker break-in is VERY real especially if the driver being broken in has a very stiff suspension. Here is some science to back it up.

http://www.audioholics.com/techtips/...kerBreakIn.php


Cable break-in.... oh boy, don't ask that one here.

Coulda sworn I posted that link...jk



I couldn't find the link for a really great article on myths in audio. It covered a lot of topics. Maybe someone here knows what I'm talking about and can post it.


I'm not saying I side with either opinion by the way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,771 Posts
Some credible speaker designers have traditionally made up break-in figures because certain high-end magazines and their reviewers BELIEVE in them. They know it will hurt their sales if they get a bad review from one of these guys and so they play to their beliefs, even if it's not really true or they don't really believe in such a thing. But they know if they can get someone to think their speaker will sound better after 200 hours of playing, the reviewer might just write-off their early bad impressions as they adjust to listening to it. Could a speaker sound better after playing for a bit...maybe, but we're probably talking about a couple of dB difference here or there at most. You're not likely to even notice it in a blind test. But you will THINK you hear huge differences if you believe you will hear those differences. More than likely, though it's your brain that is adjusting to the speakers over time, not the speaker itself. That much of the equation is VERY real. I'd call it brain break-in time for a given speaker and for some harsh speakers that time can be very long indeed.


There's a really easy way to debunk it, though. Get two sets of the same speaker that supposedly have 'large' differences between new and broke in and do a double blind audio test study using them. This method has proven time and again that MOST high-end myths that sell expensive things like cable are mostly total crap and are designed to get your money and not much else--audiophile snake-oil as it were. The power of suggestion should NOT be underestimated. The trouble is most high-end magazines would rather shoot themselves in the foot than debunk the very myths that are paying their advertising dollars. In short, it pays for them to play into high-end cable myths, etc. because it means those cable makers will pay them big bucks to advertise in their magazine. If they say $10,000 cables are no better than $20 ones at Circuit City, those cable makers are NOT going to advertise in their magazine and lost revenue ultimately equates to a dead magazine. It's also why such magazines tend to stick to reviewing the stuff of their biggest advertisers and ignore smaller companies that don't pay as much to advertise. In short, you can't TRUST these magazines period, IMO.


I just got an offer to get Stereophile for a mere $10 a year. I used to read it, but found I ultimately had no us for the magazine and the mere fact it has an over $7 cover price but less than $1 by mail for a tradionally very thick magazine ought to tell you something about advertising dollars paying for distribution at extremes. In short, I don't trust them. And when I look to see what they think of a new promising speaker, oddly enough they usually haven't reviewed it and probably never will unless it goes big time.


Sometimes, I wonder if the speakers making Class A has more to do with how much they've paid to advertise in Stereophile rather than how they actually sound. Furthermore, I have a problem with any magazine where the reviewers and the people doing the measurements are not the same person and the reviewer is then free to make up whatever they want, completely disconnected from any scientific realities. How else could room corrected speakers to less than +/- 1.5 dB fare worse than speakers rated for +/- 3dB by the SAME company (see NHT) by a given reviewer. Clearly, the corrected speakers are vastly more accurate, yet apparently the reviewer likes the colored sound better (but then some people think vinyl sounds better too, probably because of similar euphonic colorations). And then there's the traditional high-end stigma against more complex electronics being used in audio (these guys would probably crap their pants if they saw what was being used to master some of their favorite recordings, but then there's the minimalist recording fanatics also that despise any form of processing).


Ultimately, the question comes down to whether you're enjoying your audio experience. If $2000 cables that cost as much as one of you main speakers makes you think your speakers sound better than $4000 speakers with $20 cables, hey whatever floats your boat, I guess.


So are these things myths or real? It depends on your definition of real. Psychologically, they're real phenomina. Scientifically, there probably is little to no difference with most speakers (some exceptions may apply, although the effects might not always be good...cheap glue loosening up from high bass levels is not a good break-in variable).


The audiophile "Mulder" types will, of course, chime in that I'm deaf and full of it and that these phenomina, much like alien abductions, are VERY REAL and to ignore everything I said. Believe what you want.


I do agree Def. Techs are very bright sounding, though. I have BP-2 bipolar surrounds and they're good precisely because they are bright--it helps counteract the fact they aren't facing the listening position which kills some of the highs off room reflections. I don't like them much as direct-facing sub/sat combos, though. They sound a little harsh in the highs (admittedly I haven't listened to their latest speakers). Now if you have high frequency hearing loss, they might actually be a good choice as mains. Some people like bright treble, though (look at MBQuart's popularity in car audio). I personally like somewhat elevated deep bass levels (although many more modern recordings are doing it on their own so it then becomes overkill also). Sometimes, it's just taste and recordings vary so much you might even prefer one speaker for one recording and another speaker for other recordings (why sometimes badly mastered and/or recorded albums sound better on cheap speakers that naturlaly remove/add to the mis-matched levels present in the recording). Of course, keeping a good quality graphic equalizer in your tape loop might be a simpler solution for such poor recordings. Any damage to the purity of the signal would probably be minor compared to the damage already on the recording.
 
1 - 20 of 77 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top