AVS Forum banner

81 - 100 of 131 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
518 Posts
^lol you are repeating yourself . You are discarding the possibility of user error when people do it themselves, it's not that some people "can't" do a good job with it, it's that a poor soldering possibility exists.

And the second point that is escaping you, most people nowadays use banana plugs that DON'T require a solder, when you tighten two screws or fan out the copper stands, that's NOT a solder. This kind of connection is not as solid as factory terminated plugs.

Most of the separately available banana plugs nowadays you find on amazon like sewell, nakamichi etc. just have a mechanism for 'locking in' the copper cable, either by a set of screws or by fanning out the copper strands and tightening a metal piece over them.


Compression type fittings work just as well as solder. There is no study that proves otherwise. As long as there is good contact they are the same. Using bare wire is just as good too. There is no magic in cables.


-To be an audiophile you must abandon all research and science.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,633 Posts
Compression type fittings work just as well as solder. There is no study that proves otherwise. As long as there is good contact they are the same. Using bare wire is just as good too. There is no magic in cables.

-To be an audiophile you must abandon all research and science.
+1
No magic for speaker wires and cables, as long the AWG is sufficient for the distance require.
Glad you do not fall into those Snake Oil practices:)

Soldering is very easy. Most anyone can solder excellent terminations on their wires. There is nothing magic about soldering.


-To be an audiophile you must abandon all research and science.
Agree that soldering can be easy to do. The biggest part about soldering, you have to heat the connector itself. And once hot enough, the solder will go into the connector.
Other wise if melting the solder directly, one might end-up with a cold solder. Resulting in a poor connection.
The underline, is more for those reading along. And want to learn how to solder properly.


Darth
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
518 Posts
+1
No magic for speaker wires and cables, as long the AWG is sufficient for the distance require.
Glad you do not fall into those Snake Oil practices:)




Agree that soldering can be easy to do. The biggest part about soldering, you have to heat the connector itself. And once hot enough, the solder will go into the connector.
Other wise if melting the solder directly, one might end-up with a cold solder


And use flux. Even with flux core solder. Watch the solder flow through the joint to ensure you don’t get a cold joint.


-To be an audiophile you must abandon all research and science.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,896 Posts
The biggest part about soldering, you have to heat the connector itself. And once hot enough, the solder will go into the connector.
Other wise if melting the solder directly, one might end-up with a cold solder. Resulting in a poor connection.
Use flux also. True about heating the conductor first being key. The only real "art" is in threading the needle between heating the conductor long enough to get a good solder joint, but not heating it so long that you melt the insulator or whatever is around the conductor.

When I made my 10-gauge bi-wire speaker cables, my electric soldering irons could not heat up two 10-gauge wires enough to get a good solder joint without the insulation melting first, but I was able to get a good joint using a much hotter butane soldering iron (Weller PSI100K).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
All things considered, gauge, length, properly made plug connections, etc; how long do you keep cables/wires in use? The wires in use on my 5.1 system are seven years old.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,089 Posts
On the Blue Jeans Cable locking banana plugs I use, there's a "well" between the two set screws where one would solder the connection. It's used by them for their ultrasonic welding of the cables they make and sell. I have two 60watt soldering stations that use in tandem to get the soldering done on the cables I make. There's nothing but metal, no plastic to melt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,089 Posts
All things considered, gauge, length, properly made plug connections, etc; how long do you keep cables/wires in use? The wires in use on my 5.1 system are seven years old.
Pretty-much until the insulation gets crispy....which with modern materials should be never.

Good idea to check and/or even re-secure the connectors at least once a year and more often if you think of it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: darthray

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
It's too vague description and is not true.
You can use a metal coat hanger as speaker wire and get the same results as high dollar speaker wire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,633 Posts
And use flux. Even with flux core solder. Watch the solder flow through the joint to ensure you don’t get a cold joint.

-To be an audiophile you must abandon all research and science.
Use flux also. True about heating the conductor first being key. The only real "art" is in threading the needle between heating the conductor long enough to get a good solder joint, but not heating it so long that you melt the insulator or whatever is around the conductor.

When I made my 10-gauge bi-wire speaker cables, my electric soldering irons could not heat up two 10-gauge wires enough to get a good solder joint without the insulation melting first, but I was able to get a good joint using a much hotter butane soldering iron (Weller PSI100K).

How did I ever forgot to also mention, using flux:eek:
One of the basic of soldering, my Bad on this one.


Darth
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,633 Posts
Pretty-much until the insulation gets crispy....which with modern materials should be never.

Good idea to check and/or even re-secure the connectors at least once a year and more often if you think of it.
A very good point, the sleeve of the connector and also the screws if it is a none solder type. Some of mine use to loosen-up often.
That said, here's a little trick that I found many years ago. If you put a drop of a thread locker, they will never loosen-up again:)
https://www.amazon.ca/Loctite-Blue-Threadlocker-6-Milliliter-209728/dp/B000I1RSNS/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=loctite+blue+thread+sealant&qid=1559173663&s=gateway&sr=8-1

One word of caution, for those who intend to use a similar product.
Make sure you use the Blue type, since the lock can be broken. If using the Red type that say permanent, they mean permanent.
You will break the sleeve, or strip the screws head before this product give-up. And found out the hard way:eek:


Darth
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,633 Posts
All things considered, gauge, length, properly made plug connections, etc; how long do you keep cables/wires in use? The wires in use on my 5.1 system are seven years old.

Short and dirty answer. If someone cheap out for a none oxygen free wire (I don't even think they exist anymore, when it come to speakers wire).
Check the ends of the wires of corrosion, a foot or so could be affected.
Oxygen free wire, could last for ever. And if some very little corrosion occur, it might be only 1/4".
Some of mine are over 20 years old, and still doing fine:)
So after seven years, been recent in this Hobby. I am sure you are just fine.


Darth
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,879 Posts
(snip)

One word of caution, for those who intend to use a similar product.
Make sure you use the Blue type, since the lock can be broken. If using the Red type that say permanent, they mean permanent.
You will break the sleeve, or strip the screws head before this product give-up. And found out the hard way:eek:


Darth
You can remove red Loctite. All that it takes is heating the parts to 500F (260C). Might be a little hard on the plastics, though.:)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,818 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
Take any advice (including this) with a grain of sale. Speaker cables are one of the favorite subjects of debate. Remember that some audiophiles claim to be able to hear differences due to cheater cords (the cord that connects the electric power from the wall to the receiver or amplifier). You can spend hundreds, or thousands, of dollars on a single cheater cord.
You are referring to the power cord that connects your amplifier as 'cheater' cord? Well in a few blind A/B testings, power cords have shown to have some 'effect' on sound, google it. Most of the times though you will be okay with the original power cord that comes inside your amplifier box. And in many testings, it has been proven if that cord connected to your power amplifier is going through a power conditioner, it is limiting the current to your amplifier and thus reducing sound quality.
Cheater cords are ground lift cords.
And they can easily be heard blind or not, but only sometimes (when they work as intended)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,884 Posts
Prove it. Where is the study?


-To be an audiophile you must abandon all research and science.
It's an easy test -- plug in a power cable that works, you can hear music; plug in a cable with a break in the middle, you don't! ;):D

edit: as an aside, as a stern cable skeptic, I recently had the..pleasure...of talking to a dealer (whose name and location I will not disclose, despite they will probably never find this forum and were otherwise a delight to work with) who was very convinced otherwise. "All my customers hear a difference, it is strikingly obvious." Was willing to mail me samples of cables to try on my own until I told him the lengths I'd need, lol. But, I say this because if I weren't so rigidly fixed in my science-minded approach, I could have easily bought into the tactics he used. It sounded so...possible when he touted the "science" of skin-effect (without calling it skin effect, but I knew exactly what he was driving at). He said so many things (many of which I won't repeat because they'll probably give him away) which almost got even me to bite...and, maybe for the hell of it, one day I will when I have short enough cables to take him up on his generous offer. But, if I ever do, I'll be sure to cover the cables from amp to speaker with blankets and have my wife be the one to randomly decide which wires to connect and ask her to connect/disconnect a different pair every day (if she wants). Then, I'll keep a listening log and see if it correlates to her swaps...I doubt it. Not a perfect blind study, but...best I'm willing to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
518 Posts
It's an easy test -- plug in a power cable that works, you can hear music; plug in a cable with a break in the middle, you don't! ;):D


He is not talking about a cable with a short. He is talking about a cable that is magically conditioning the power.


-To be an audiophile you must abandon all research and science.
 
81 - 100 of 131 Posts
Top