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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im confused about this....


So lets say that i turn the volume up too loud when i get my Monitor70s/CS2...since i do not have an amp, and therefore there wont be enough power to drive the speakers, it could produce clipping and damage my speakers?


Do i have that right? I dont quite understand clipping.
 

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When an AMP either external or and AVR run out of "juice" it will produce an awful loud noise that indeed can cause damage to the speaker drivers. I'ts the amp that clips not the speaker.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by SAVholic /forum/post/20762354


When an AMP either external or and AVR run out of "juice" it will produce an awful loud noise that indeed can cause damage to the speaker drivers. I'ts the amp that clips not the speaker.

So basically just dont turn it up too loud? Is this why my receiver only goes up to something like 70 before it says "max?"
 

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It could have some sort of protection circuit to prevent or minimize this. So I'll recommend not to play it like you're DJ Tiesto. BTW what AVR you have and what are the measurements of the room.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have the HT-R670 (page 7) that came with the HTiaB. Ive heard its similar to the TX-SR606 . The room is quite small, about 15x15. I never intend on really making it too loud or anything, but i just want to know so that i can make sure i dont accidentally do it. If i took these small HTiaB speakers to max volume and theyre fine, should i assume the same for the new stuff?
 

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When an amp runs out of sufficient current to drive the speakers cleanly, whether continuously or on dynamic peaks, the amps' signal will "Clip", sending a clipped, distorted signal to the speakers causing the drivers to heat up from the excessive distorion. This will damage, or burnout the drivers, typically the tweeters but may also affect the woofers/mids too.


The best thing to do is detemine how loudly you like to play them and power them accordingly. Even if you are only going to crank them once a year, you still need the power to do that.
 

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Clipping can occur at any stage of the chain. Typically however we often refer to amplifier clipping. In this pic, one can see a signal within the linear range of an device, and a signal being clipped due to being pushed outside the linear range of the device.




When we refer to clipping, we mean that the tops of the signal are clipped off and this is when the signal level is exceeding the maximum capability of the amplifier, or any other piece in the system. When the signal is clipped, a loudspeaker isn't being made to move due to it's receiving essentially a DC signal. So all the power ends up heating the voice coil instead of producing motion.


One very important aspect of clipping is while high frequency drivers have less mass than low frequency drivers. This material mass translates into thermal inertia. The higher this thermal inertia is, the more it takes to change the temperature of the mass. This results in HF drivers can heat up much, much faster than LF drivers.


Audibility of clipping varies with depending on which element in your system encounters clipping. Spectral content weighted heavily on the lower octaves can easily clip a LF amp in a HT system. Depending on the design of the amp, some designs will behave nice and predictably when over driven into clipping. Other designs result in oddly spurious artifacts when driven too hard. Compression used during recording or mastering can be a determining factor on how easily a system encounters clipping due to wildly huge peaks associated with some effects or musical signals.


Good luck


Here is a little better pic showing more detail;


 
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