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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I'm wondering how normal speaker stands are mass loaded with sand/lead? Where are the holes? At the side of the columns or on top at the top plate/platform? I might be constructing my own speaker stands with steel, so I need to know where I need to put holes and stuff for loading...I'm interested in a 4 thick column design like the Plateau V-25 at http://avfurnishings.com/Display.asp?Product=400


Also, I can't seem to find any center speaker stands around. Can someone point me in the right direction to get inspiration?


Thanks!
 

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Wood Technology/Metal Technology makes 3 models of center channel speaker stands. The CT-12E (12" high), the CT-18E (18" high), the CT-28E (28" high). All are black metal, include floor spikes, isolation pads, and hidden wire path. MSRP is $69.95 - $79.95. Contact me at: http://www.mrhookup.org if you want me to put you in touch with my supplier.
 

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check audioadvisor.com they usually have a wide selection of such items.


To answer your question about loading: Since you're building them yourself however works best for you to load them is the way you should do it. There are manufacturers who use each of the methods you listed.


Kirk
 

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I use a Sound Anchor center channel stand.


Their site is hard to navigate but the stands are great. The particular model I bought is the CC-3 from this page. Adjustable height and angle; in black. It came pre-loaded so I don't know where they insert the weight. :(
 

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Discussion Starter #5
For the center speaker I'm thinking of just using a solid wooden block with a granite/marble slab on top, would that be a good idea?
 

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The only problems I can think of for laying a center channel on a solid surface is getting the baffle out in front of the surface to keep early reflections from causing a combing problem and isolating one large surface (the platform) from another (the cabinet bottom) to reduce vibrations.


For the combing problem, letting the front of the speaker overhang the surface should do it. For the isolation, some rubber dampeners stuck to the bottom of the cabinet should do it.


As for how this *really* live object (a solid block of wood will reflect sound very well) will fit into the over-all sound environment, I'll leave that to you. :)
 
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