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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a chance to get some materials for my sand-filled bookshelf speaker stands tonight! I hope they turn out. I just pictured them in my head and designed them from the ground up, stealing various designs along the way. Very very simple to make, but after hearing the deadening function of sand-filled ones the other day, I just had to have a pair (well, 2 pairs).



First up, the base plate (2x10, cut to 10" x 14"), and the two plates that hold the 3" PVC piping, which will hold the sand. You can see the middle plate has had its corners cut. All the plates will be like that in the end.




Next, we have the rough plates stacked as they will appear in the finished project. Very roughly placed together. Looks ugly, but sanded and stained beyond belief will make 'em purrty (I hope!!).




Same shot, showing the 3" PVC placed in the center hole. Only the top 2 plates have holes. The top two plates will be glued together, then probably screwed to the bottom plate. Or, the middle plate will be screwed to the bottom plate, with the top plate glued down, hiding the screws (I'm open to suggestions). PVC is cut to 36", giving the stands a total height of about 40"




This is where the sand will go in. Did I mention these will be HEAVY mo-fo's??




The top section is the mirror image of the bottom section! So easy and modular. Building 4 stands took no more time than building 1 stand (not including all the sanding that is about to start.....)




This is where the speakers go (Polk RTi6's).




That's it. The next few weeks will be SANDING, covering the PVC with carpet, gluing, assembling, and then enjoying! I'll post pics of the finished product when I'm done. Its not super elaborate, but it totally fits the room they are going in and more importantly, I hope the function exceeds the form!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by MameXP /forum/post/15550116


That looks extremely unstable. Good luck bro

Filled one with sand, just to try it out. It would take a truck to knock it over. Overall weight has to be over 35lbs. These are the most stable stands I have ever seen.
 

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That design looks great, I really like it! Looks like something I might have done. Are you going to use a roundover on and of the edges? I think that would make it look a bit nicer. As for securing the three plates, I'd probably glue to two smaller pieces together, probably using screws going from the thick one into the thin one, just to hold while the glue dries. Then I'd do the same, screwing from the bottom plate into the other two. This of course, will leave you exposed screws on the top. You could either counter sink and fill those with stainable filler or a plug, or if you are going to put some sort of pad on top, they'll be hidden anyway.


If they're on a hard floor as opposed to carpet, I see them being plenty stable. If you're using them on thick carpet, you could consider putting spikes on the bottom.
 

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Great design... I did something comparable but with an aluminum centre piece..bought from the scrap dealer.

 

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Cool! I made a pair similar for some small sattelite speakers.

I used an oak base, some black threaded pipe with end plates on them and two way industrial tape to hold the speaker in place. I then wrapped teh black pipe in grey pipe insulation. I'll get a photo tonight.


I also routed a channel in the bottom, so no wires are seen.


Drew
 

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For the finish, be sure to use "wood conditioner" on that material prior to staining them, or you'll get very streaky results. Minwax makes some to work with their stains, and just follow the directions. For the plates that show, you would have been better served to buy clear material rather than the common stock you used...nicer furniture finish would be achieved without the knots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aaron Gilbert /forum/post/15550512


That design looks great, I really like it! Looks like something I might have done. Are you going to use a roundover on and of the edges? I think that would make it look a bit nicer. As for securing the three plates, I'd probably glue to two smaller pieces together, probably using screws going from the thick one into the thin one, just to hold while the glue dries. Then I'd do the same, screwing from the bottom plate into the other two. This of course, will leave you exposed screws on the top. You could either counter sink and fill those with stainable filler or a plug, or if you are going to put some sort of pad on top, they'll be hidden anyway.


If they're on a hard floor as opposed to carpet, I see them being plenty stable. If you're using them on thick carpet, you could consider putting spikes on the bottom.

Thanks Aaron! Yes, with the edges, I am going to one of two things. I am either going to round the edges with a router, or I am going to glue moldings to the outside. Right now, I'm leaning towards the routering....


For the bottom, I have 4 1" thick rubber feet. This is going on hardwood, but I didn't want to take any chances. And I decided to screw the middle piece to the bottom plate, but then glue the top piece to hide the screws.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Kanaris /forum/post/15551023


Great design... I did something comparable but with an aluminum centre piece..bought from the scrap dealer.


Nice man! Same design basically!


Quote:
Originally Posted by drewbad /forum/post/15551411


Cool! I made a pair similar for some small sattelite speakers.

I used an oak base, some black threaded pipe with end plates on them and two way industrial tape to hold the speaker in place. I then wrapped teh black pipe in grey pipe insulation. I'll get a photo tonight.


I also routed a channel in the bottom, so no wires are seen.


Drew

Thanks Drew. Yeah, I'm going to put a set of holes right next to the PVC in each plate. Then my speaker wire can run right up the back, hidden from plain sight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Hef /forum/post/15552036


For the finish, be sure to use "wood conditioner" on that material prior to staining them, or you'll get very streaky results. Minwax makes some to work with their stains, and just follow the directions. For the plates that show, you would have been better served to buy clear material rather than the common stock you used...nicer furniture finish would be achieved without the knots.

Good to know man. I'll check if Home Depot has any.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Favelle /forum/post/15553823


Good to know man. I'll check if Home Depot has any.


Even better, I'd use a gel stain. That huge difference in the color of the heart wood and the sap wood in that middle piece won't be reduced with stain... But gel stain will allow you do blend the color differences.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Favelle /forum/post/15553798


Yeah, I'm going to put a set of holes right next to the PVC in each plate. Then my speaker wire can run right up the back, hidden from plain sight.

I would install a permanent wire in the stand with banana jacks installed flush on the top and bottom parts of the stand. Then it could go through the PVC. No wires. Would look awesome.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigguyZ /forum/post/15554060


Even better, I'd use a gel stain. That huge difference in the color of the heart wood and the sap wood in that middle piece won't be reduced with stain... But gel stain will allow you do blend the color differences.

Why would you want to reduce or blend the color difference? It's the differences which make a piece of wood unique and attractive, in my opinion.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aaron Gilbert /forum/post/15554941


...It's the differences which make a piece of wood unique and attractive, in my opinion.

Have you ever seen a really nice piece of furniture with great differences in stain color? Yes, some woods look very nice in their natural finish, but he's used somewhat 'construction grade' material for the stands, and the finish will be able to hide that if it's done correctly.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Hef /forum/post/15556698


Have you ever seen a really nice piece of furniture with great differences in stain color? Yes, some woods look very nice in their natural finish, but he's used somewhat 'construction grade' material for the stands, and the finish will be able to hide that if it's done correctly.

Jim,


I understand what you're saying, and no, really high quality (or even medium quality) pieces of furniture rarely have big differences in stain color. I'm just saying that not everything needs to look like most fine furniture to be aesthetically appealing and stylish. Natural wood has variations in it's color and grain, and I think bringing them out is equally as valid as trying to hide them. In these particular stands, I suppose which way I went would depend on how the speakers and the rest of the furniture in the room look.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigguyZ /forum/post/15554060


Even better, I'd use a gel stain. That huge difference in the color of the heart wood and the sap wood in that middle piece won't be reduced with stain... But gel stain will allow you do blend the color differences.

Nice man. Who makes that? Is it available in a quite a few different shades? I'd like to match the cherry stain I used to make my HD DVD/Blu-ray rack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by XanderMoser /forum/post/15554255


I would install a permanent wire in the stand with banana jacks installed flush on the top and bottom parts of the stand. Then it could go through the PVC. No wires. Would look awesome.

Dude, that kicks ass. Nice idea!! Question though, is adding another set of connections going to affect sound quality? If not, that's EXACTLY what I am going to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aaron Gilbert /forum/post/15557359


Jim,


I understand what you're saying, and no, really high quality (or even medium quality) pieces of furniture rarely have big differences in stain color. I'm just saying that not everything needs to look like most fine furniture to be aesthetically appealing and stylish. Natural wood has variations in it's color and grain, and I think bringing them out is equally as valid as trying to hide them. In these particular stands, I suppose which way I went would depend on how the speakers and the rest of the furniture in the room look.

Along that train of though Aaron, if you notice the 3rd picture, my top plate has a few knots on the top. Now, every single plate can be situated so the knots are "hidden", but I was thinking it would be more aesthetically pleasing to have the knots showing, in all their glory? What's the general opinion? hide knots at all costs? Or leave them showing to make it more "natural"? I assume the stain is only going to accentuate them too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigguyZ /forum/post/15554060


Even better, I'd use a gel stain. That huge difference in the color of the heart wood and the sap wood in that middle piece won't be reduced with stain... But gel stain will allow you do blend the color differences.

Wanna know something crazy? That's not heartwood and sapwood. In real life, that outer wood is actually a BLUE colour. Its a fungus that is brought in by the bark beetle. Its quite amazing to see in real life. I wonder how the stain is going to treat it!
 

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Those will be very sturdy when filled with sand. Here is a set I built about six years ago for my Dennis Murphy MBOW1s. These are made from 3/4" MDF and filled with sand. The bases are 1.5" MDF and they are really heavy.
 
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