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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Will 16g be okay for a 200watt amp with Rocket or Martin Logan fronts? Reason why I ask is my house is pre-wired with 16g and I need to know if I need to start over.
 

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What lengths?
 

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... and what Rockets or ML's?


The wire is already there right??? My guess is that you will be OK. If my house was pre-wired, I would always try the existing wires first before pulling new ones. The long wire runs are generally for the surrounds anyway, so you probably won't notice any difference between 12g or 16g when watching a movie.


HTH

- Hal
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The length is 25'. The component rack is located in the back so the projector can be close. The rack is in-wall mounted, so moving the rack is not an option.
 

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Ahhhh, so your fronts and center will have the long runs. Actually, 25' is not that long. I have used 16g wire for runs will over that, but not for my mains.


However, I still think you will be fine. If you want thicker wire, then the next thing you will want to bi-wire (if your speakers accept that) and then you are really screwed. :)


Regards,

Hal
 

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That would be about 0.1 Ohms of resistance. Even if your speakers go down to 2 Ohms, that is only 5% loss in signal - I doubt you could hear the difference.


You could perform a simple test to see what the difference would be in going to approx 13 ga by adding another 16 ga speaker wire in parallel. Make a run about the same length, connect it to the speaker, then have someone connect and disconnect it from the amp while you listen (do this with only the one speaker playing).
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the reply. Next question is, the speaker wire that is run has a green vinyl jacket. Inside the jacket are four seperate wires; Black, red, green, and white. Could those four wires be used for bi-wiring? I have not done that before hence the ignorance.
 

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Absolutely, which helps the 16-ga. dilemma. You can either bi-wire or just parallel. Let us know if you hear a difference between the two. Remember to keep polarity right either way.
 

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You are in business! Like Larry said, you get to experiment at zero cost!


Remember to compare PARALLEL (two wires on red post at amp, same two on red post of speakers, repeat for blacks, keep jumper block on your speakers) with BI-WIRE(two wires on red post at amp, one of these going to one of your red posts, one to the other, repeat for blacks, jumper removed). Many people mistakenly compare bi-wiring to the single set of wires. In that case, the difference is most likely due to the fact that you have a larger wire when bi-wiring, and not the bi-wiring itself.
 

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In other words, bi-wire, and then just listen with and without the jumpers.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by ssabin
You could perform a simple test to see what the difference would be in going to approx 13 ga by adding another 16 ga speaker wire in parallel.
Larry,

Would two 16g =13g??


If so that I can get the in-wall wire (16/4) and wire 2x2 for my speakers. If I want to go bi-wired, then I can do it in the future....


This would then equal 13g?? I'd rather have 12g in-wall but HD (for one) does not sell it.


Right?? or not??


(Yes I know Richmond is only a 1.5 hour drive south on 301 from me... but I don't know if Fine Electric carries it or their pricing.)


PM me....
 

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Worm, the equivalent is more like 2 x 16 ga = somewhere between 11 and 12 in capacity. Likewise, 2 x 14 = betw. 9 & 10, 2 x 12 = betw. 7 & 8, etc.


The HD's around here have 12 ga. in the clear plastic style. I don't stock stuff to "sell", I buy as the need arises, but I do buy in bulk, never by the foot.


I AM Fine Electric. I, my fianceé, and her daughter's fianceé are the total install team. We are experts at getting wiring within walls, and make it look original.


I don't know what you would like to ask me, so you PM me, or call me. The number is on my site. (It's a secret! Don't tell anyone!)


Let me know what you think about our site. It's my first-ever website, and we did our own graphics and raw HTML, no web-page editors, etc.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Larry Fine
Worm, the equivalent is more like 2 x 16 ga = somewhere between 11 and 12 in capacity. Likewise, 2 x 14 = betw. 9 & 10, 2 x 12 = betw. 7 & 8, etc.
Wire gauge is based on the logarithm of the cross-sectional area.


16 gauge has a cross-section of .00203 square inches.

13 gauge has a cross-section of .00407 square inches.

10 gauge has a cross-section of .00815 square inches.


Double the wire, and you'll have the total cross-section and resistance of a single wire three AWG numbers smaller (log10 of 2 is 3).


For us low-power guys who are just concerned about voltage drop, two wires work like one three gauges smaller.


You electrical code guys rate wiring based on an allowable temperature increase, which comes from both the resistance (inverse square of diameter) and surface area (proportional to diameter) - so you can get less than twice the current through a single wire three gauge numbers lower (the restance is half, but the surface area only increases by sqrt(2) = 1.4. That's a different ballgame.
 
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