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The speaker wire runs to my rear channels are different in length. To keep them the same I have approximately 10' of extra wire coiled up near the receiver. Is this a good idea? Will the coiled up wire pick up noise? Is it better to just make the run the length it needs to be and not worry about the differance in resistance?


Second question: The two runs to the Rear Surround channel and Side surround are zip tied together (one on top of the other) every 3 feet and are tucked under the baseboard trim. Will the speaker wires being that close to each other cause a problem?
 

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Unless the difference in length between your speaker wires starts approaching a mile, the length difference isn't a problem (if you have a mile of speaker wire, you have other problems in any case).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bandit212 /forum/post/15462254


The speaker wire runs to my rear channels are different in length. To keep them the same I have approximately 10' of extra wire coiled up near the receiver.

I did the same thing since I wasn't sure if it would have an effect or not. I figured better safe than sorry. Mine, however, is coiled in the ceiling not far from the speakers and wire tied into loops. I haven't noticed any issues with it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bandit212 /forum/post/15462254


The speaker wire runs to my rear channels are different in length. To keep them the same I have approximately 10' of extra wire coiled up near the receiver. Is this a good idea? Will the coiled up wire pick up noise? Is it better to just make the run the length it needs to be and not worry about the differance in resistance?

As Dennis already said, just cut it to length. You will not hear the difference.

Quote:
Second question: The two runs to the Rear Surround channel and Side surround are zip tied together (one on top of the other) every 3 feet and are tucked under the baseboard trim. Will the speaker wires being that close to each other cause a problem?

No problem there either.
 

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If you want to do the math take the speed of light and assume that one cable is 20 ft longer. Calculate the time and then multiply times the speed of sound and you can get a relative apparent distance difference between the two speakers that would be introduced by the longer cable. It is basically less than the thickness of your eardrum. Assuming you could get your head positioned exactly could you hold it that still?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC /forum/post/15464642


If you want to do the math take the speed of light and assume that one cable is 20 ft longer. Calculate the time and then multiply times the speed of sound and you can get a relative apparent distance difference between the two speakers that would be introduced by the longer cable. It is basically less than the thickness of your eardrum. Assuming you could get your head positioned exactly could you hold it that still?



At the time I wasn't concerned with speed of light, but that there could be the possibility of additional resistance in the 'longer' of the two cables, which could affect the volume of that channel. I suspect the crappier the wire (read: thin gauge) the more this could be a factor over a shorter distance than with a good quality wire.


I've seen this with my MAME machine where one channel's wire is shorter than another (I chopped the teeny wires that comes with the computer speakers) due to layout. The longer plays at a lower volume and I have to force it into balance. I just didn't want to run into that again when I ran the theater wire so I played it safe. No harm though, right?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gryhnd /forum/post/15465186




At the time I wasn't concerned with speed of light, but that there could be the possibility of additional resistance in the 'longer' of the two cables, which could affect the volume of that channel. I suspect the crappier the wire (read: thin gauge) the more this could be a factor over a shorter distance than with a good quality wire.


I've seen this with my MAME machine where one channel's wire is shorter than another (I chopped the teeny wires that comes with the computer speakers) due to layout. The longer plays at a lower volume and I have to force it into balance. I just didn't want to run into that again when I ran the theater wire so I played it safe. No harm though, right?

I remember reading some technical paper specifying to keep within 10% length for same RH/LH channels, so not exact but rough. Cable impedance was the point so the amp see's close to same load RH/LH., not how fast the electrons travel in the wire.

I did that but when put into my wall made sure random pattern, not loop.


Front wall before drywall shows the RH cable being snaked to use up extra length to be within 10% of LH cable, of course 90deg to any high voltage area and kept 18" or more apart if parallel.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbdudex /forum/post/15470335


I remember reading some technical paper specifying to keep within 10% length for same RH/LH channels, so not exact but rough. Cable impedance was the point so the amp see's close to same load RH/LH., not how fast the electrons travel in the wire.

I did that but when put into my wall made sure random pattern, not loop.

I believe if you use the appropriated sized wire this is non-issue.
 
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