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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Back in 2004 I hired a contractor to finish my basement - the house had a finished bedroom, closet, and bathroom and the rest was unfinished. We designed a second bedroom and a multi-use room which would house my front projection theater as well as an air hockey table, scrapbooking table, and counter for the mini theater-style popcorn machine. I was very happy with how it turned out - I ran the cables for the projector and sound system myself, which was a good thing then, not so good now (more on that later). I had the contractor sub the drywall to the best drywallers in the area and they did a great job, absolutely no visible seams or nail pops even now, 12 years later. The ceiling is white textured drywall with overhead can fixtures, two circuits with dimmers and indoor spot lights. There are also sconce lights on the walls, on a separate circuit with dimmers too. No windows in the theater room, so we get decent light control. The walls are painted a flat tan color.






The screen is painted on the wall - it's a custom light grey color that I rolled on myself. The color was recommended here on the forums, but so long ago that I no longer recall the specifics, not that it would matter as I'll need to redo the screen since the current is a 4:3 aspect ratio and I'm going to move to 16:9.

As for the theater components - I installed a ceiling-mounted InFocus X1, using component and S-video cables to run through the ceiling and front wall. The sound system is 6.1 using Fluance speakers and sub. Older Denon receiver and older Sony Blu-Ray (before they stopped allowing digital HD signal via component). Currently using Dish Hopper w/Sling for TV/DVR, contract ends in April and haven't decided what to do then - may switch to DirecTV, or Sony PS Vue/Netflix. But that's for another thread. You can see my current setup in the attached pictures. Don't mind the mess - we got new carpet upstairs and moved a bunch of stuff down there, but it's getting cleaned out this weekend. The seating isn't ideal - we originally had nice leather reclining furniture but it was so nice we moved it into our living room - the old reclining sofa and loveseat went here and so we have good seating for two, and OK for a third. They will be replaced soon but I'm not going to focus on that yet as I don't have the money to replace them right now.

Next posts will deal with the individual topics I am working - replacing the projector, establishing HDMI signal, replacing the receiver, and creating a new screen wall. If you want to join me along the way, or pop in with suggestions I would love the help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Topic 1 - Projector

So this one is pretty much decided - I have the BenQ HT2050 arriving later this week. I chose this based on my other thread: http://www.avsforum.com/forum/68-di...g-my-old-projector-your-thoughts-welcome.html

Key factors in the decision aside from it's reputation were that it's DLP and I'm used to the DLP picture from my X1, as well as the fact that my X1 is mounted 14'4" from the screen and the HT2050 will give me a good image size at that throw. Since the power outlet is already established on the ceiling at this location, I wanted my new projector to mount about where my old one sat. I also ordered the QualGear PRB-717 mount in white - it arrived today and looks like it will work great in my existing location.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Topic 2 - Establish HDMI Connection

This one is a tough call. The existing wire run in the ceiling and wall isn't going to make pulling an HDMI cable easy - in fact it may be impossible through the existing run. I pulled the component and S-video cable myself after framing and before drywalling - I simply used a spade bit in my drill to pass through each of the ceiling joists between the projector and the wall, and then ran them down the the wall along the stud to the receptacle. No conduit, and no pull-string.

So I can try to pull out the S-video cable and tape a new long HDMI cable to it, but I'm certain that the component cable is intertwined meaning I'd be pulling both cables out. I'm also near-certain the bends in the existing run will be too much for a quality long HDMI cable. My other options are to get a longer HDMI cable and go in the ceiling to the side, parallel to the joists. I can go about 7' and then open to an unfinished storage area, where I can run the 14' forward toward the screen wall, then 8' down to the floor, and about 8' back across to the receiver. 40' would probably do it, 45' would definitely do it for a single-cable run. The main concern with that is running into one of the can fixtures - I'd have to be careful to avoid it and the electrical wiring. For those reasons I'm going to call this my first fallback option.

My chosen option at this point is to give wireless HDMI a try. I have read lots of negatives, but some positives as well. I ordered the BenQ WDP01 wireless HDMI transmitter/receiver kit. If it doesn't work, it'll get returned, but if it does it will save me a ton of wiring headaches.

My other thought is to run Cat6 - it might be slightly easier to run, but I don't know much about running video via Cat6 so any input there would be helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Topic 3 - Replacing Reciever

My old Denon receiver doesn't give me HDMI capability, so it's time for an upgrade.

This one is already decided (for now) as I got a great deal on a refurb Onkyo TX-NR646 from Accessories4Less. It will be here this week as well. It's an upgrade in almost every way from my old Denon, and it gets good reviews in comparison to others in its class for movie sound clarity. I probably won't be upgrading the 6.1 Fluance speaker system itself any time soon, so the Atmos and DTS:X features won't really matter to me for now, and if I do upgrade down the road I'm sure this one component will be easy to replace.

The ultimate test will come when it arrives to ensure it works well and sounds good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Topic 4 - New Screen Wall

First off, the theater room will be used mostly for blu-ray movies with the sconces turned to the lowest dim setting. Next use will be for college football, with the sconces about 2/3 down. My son also games in the room some - not a great deal but enough for him to complain about the need for some lighting and how it washes out the image.

The old screen wall, as you can see in the pictures from post 1, was painted on the wall using a short nap roller and custom grey paint. The color is irrelevant now, but you can see from the pictures in this post how it looks in action with the X1 - very good to my eyes with no ambient light, decent with some ambient light (the sconces dimmed about two-thirds), but worse with more ambient light. The wall was primed and painted a tan color that equates to Sherwin Williams Nomadic Desert in a flat finish. I rolled the grey screen paint on top of that, taking care to leave the surface very smooth with no roller marks. I painted the screen after hanging the projector and used the desired projected image as my guide. I taped off the outside edges with the best blue painter's tape I could find. For reference, this is a 101" diagonal 4:3 screen.

The frame I built myself - got 2x2 poplar cut to rough size at Lowe's, then cut my own miter joints after careful measurement. I then spray painted the whole thing with a black textured paint that gives the frame a powder-coated look. Then screwed the whole thing to the wall around the screen, filled the uneven joints with paintable silicone filler that I then painted flat black. I used black screws too. Up close you can see the uneven joints that don't look great, but the poplar isn't easy to cut and my measurements may have been slightly off as well. Anyway, the frame looks good from the seating, and especially with the lights down.

For my next screen, I will be pulling off and discarding the frame - it served me well but time to go. I'll fill the screw holes and sand smooth. Then, after hanging the projector, I'll mark off the native 16:9 image at my desired size - probably around 145" diagonal. First I'll mark off the inside edge, and the plan is to paint the surrounding screen wall a darker flat color. My wife won't let me go with black paint on the wall, so I'm going as dark in the same color family as I can - SW's Coconut Husk got the initial approval from the wife. After painting the surrounding wall, I'll pull off the tape and allow the paint to dry. Then I'll mask the outside edge with tape and paint my screen. I'll address the screen paint color in the next post, but to finish the look I'm planning to frame the screen with this plain moulding from Home Depot, painted a flat black. I liked the textured, powder-coated look 12 years ago but it's dated now, and I think plain flat black will look better. Since it's vinyl it should be easy to cut the miter corners, and should mount to the wall easily using small brad nails.

Now it's on to the screen paint choice - lots of great options but I'll use the next post to go into detail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Topic 4a - Choosing Screen Paint for the Wall

Based on the existing room, the desire to paint on the wall, and the fact that I have next to no spray painting experience compared to lots of rolling experience, I'm mostly set on rolling paint. So that limits my DIY choices somewhat away from some of the more advanced solutions I've found here.

There's the MaxxMudd (RS-MM-LL) formula that appears to be rollable. There's the rollable formulas that Ftoast has put forth in this thread: http://www.avsforum.com/forum/110-d...asy-ambient-light-rejecting-screen-paint.html. I'm sure there are others, but what I think I want is something that allows some ambient light for football and gaming, but also looks great with the lights mostly down for blu-rays. I realize my white ceiling will have some negative impact, but for now there's nothing to be done about it - my wife won't go for any dark paint color on the ceiling. Here's where I'd love your input if you have any - given the specifics of the projector, screen size, and throw (BenQ HT2050 on a 145" diagonal 16:9 screen at 14'4" throw), what would you recommend? I'm not afraid to mix paints, but I don't want to spend a small fortune on the pre-made mixes like the Goo solution.

I will probably post in the DIY screen section as well but anyone here that wants to reply with ideas is appreciated.
 

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Hi here...on your Build Thread.

OK...absolutely RS-MaxxMudd-LL is a better choice, as it has the gain you need. Any darker Gray that is not an advanced formula that you "must" spray is not going to provide you enough gain to do both....excel in creating the deepest Blacks possible, (...something the 2050 can use a leg-up doing...) while not failing to provide enough gain to give you a more-than-passable bright enough image in ambient light.

Too bad I didn't catch you before you ordered you Wireless HDMI. The Optoma Unit is by far the best I've used.
https://www.amazon.com/Optoma-WHD200-Wireless-Transmitter-Receiver/dp/B00BPXILY8/

It has the longest Range by a great many feet and does actually work through a Wall or Cabinet.

I build Theaters...and I need things that work without question. I've tried at least 4 other less expensive options.....all failed the test. Some out of the Box, others when tried in any circumstance that was not at the minimum specification required.

In the last 2 years I've ordered / Installed 6-7 WHD200 s and all are still working flawlessly.

...............if that counts for anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi here...on your Build Thread.

OK...absolutely RS-MaxxMudd-LL is a better choice, as it has the gain you need. Any darker Gray that is not an advanced formula that you "must" spray is not going to provide you enough gain to do both....excel in creating the deepest Blacks possible, (...something the 2050 can use a leg-up doing...) while not failing to provide enough gain to give you a more-than-passable bright enough image in ambient light.

Too bad I didn't catch you before you ordered you Wireless HDMI. The Optoma Unit is by far the best I've used.
https://www.amazon.com/Optoma-WHD200-Wireless-Transmitter-Receiver/dp/B00BPXILY8/

It has the longest Range by a great many feet and does actually work through a Wall or Cabinet.

I build Theaters...and I need things that work without question. I've tried at least 4 other less expensive options.....all failed the test. Some out of the Box, others when tried in any circumstance that was not at the minimum specification required.

In the last 2 years I've ordered / Installed 6-7 WHD200 s and all are still working flawlessly.

...............if that counts for anything.
Counts for a LOT - thanks again! Appreciate the suggestion, so am I correct in assuming the Optoma wireless unit will work rather universally (as in, with my HT2050)? I'm not married to the BenQ wireless unit, hasn't arrived yet and will be easy to return.

Looking hard at the RS-MaxxMudd-LL solution, may choose that as my first option to roll - that is unless you can convince me to tinker with spraying as I brought up in the screen thread.

Might not get said enough, but it's great that a pro will come here and spend time with us amateur DIYers - thanks for all your help!
 

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Counts for a LOT - thanks again! Appreciate the suggestion, so am I correct in assuming the Optoma wireless unit will work rather universally (as in, with my HT2050)? I'm not married to the BenQ wireless unit, hasn't arrived yet and will be easy to return.
It's a significant improvment, and yes...it's a universal Wireless. I've used it on everything fromOptomas, BenQs, Epsons, and Samsung TVs. If possible be sure to purchase via A-Prime though. As in all things electronic, a no Qs-Free Return/Replacement for 30 Days is always a good thing to have in reserve.

Looking hard at the RS-MaxxMudd-LL solution, may choose that as my first option to roll - that is unless you can convince me to tinker with spraying as I brought up in the screen thread.
I bet I can! The best way might be to say that although I do the Screens for a living, and need them to be a perfect as possible, I also do things as simply as possible...as quickly as possible, as easily and as affordably as possible. Seems to just make good sense.

And it's that good sense approach that has been behind every effort expended "out there" as well as behind all my Forum advice. While some of it may seem to be more to do than normal, it's always a case where you achieve far more than you were expecting.

Much more to came soon.:cool:

Might not get said enough, but it's great that a pro will come here and spend time with us amateur DIYers - thanks for all your help!
Your welcome....and Thank you. Contributing was / has been my goal from the start. The things I learned about painting screens from just one surf of the AVS Screens Forum in 2001 launched my efforts to combine such with my Theater systems. So I try to share my methods and results, and after 14 years.....well :eek:

I just gotta keep at it. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So, first choice on paint for my screen wall is rolling RS-MaxxMudd-LL, as updated by MississippiMan for my setup. Ordered the metallics and poly from Amazon, and will get the white base and black additive from Home Depot along with my painting supplies. I've decided that if I end up not liking the results of rolling, I'll likely move to Silver Fire and spraying. Hope springs eternal!

While waiting for the paint to show up, I'll get started this weekend by mounting the new BenQ and setting up the wireless HDMI BenQ unit. If that doesn't work, it's back to Amazon for the Optoma wireless unit as recommended by (again) MississippiMan.

Once the electronics components are up and running, I'll then remove my existing screen frame, fill the screw holes with joint compound, and sand smooth, along with sanding the existing screen paint edges. Since the existing screen was primed and then painted on top of the original wall paint and the new screen will be bigger, I need to ensure the old edges aren't visible.

After the wall repairs are done and dry, next will be to project my desired image on the wall - I'm anticipating 126" x 71" for a 145" diagonal 16:9 image. I'll mark off the inside edge with painter's tape, and then paint the rest of the wall. Wife is still deciding but we are leaning to Sherwin Williams Coconut Husk as mentioned in an earlier post.

After this is done and dry it will be time to prime and paint the new screen.

Then I'll take my moulding, cut it to frame my image, and paint it flat black. I thought about wrapping it in black velvet or felt, but I think I'm just going to take the easy way with spray paint. I'll use a very minimal bead of wood glue to hold each piece to the wall while I brad nail it. Then I'll fill the nail holes and any joint gaps with paintable putty and touch it all up with the black paint.

If all goes well, I hope to be finished before the end of the month! I'll update with each step in my progress and post pictures along the way. Thanks to everyone that's provided suggestions and tips, they are all appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Got a few things done over the weekend, so figured I'd post an update.

Replaced old Denon receiver with Onkyo TX-NR646 - this wasn't too difficult, but did require some effort since my speaker setup is an older 6.1 setup, with sub, front L, front R, Center, surround L and R, and a single rear height speaker. When making the speaker connections I used the Onkyo's rear R connection for my solo rear speaker, figuring I could just turn off the rear L speaker in setup. Upon power up, it was set as a default 7.1, but within the setup wizard I noticed a setting for 6.1. Unfortunately I didn't pay close enough attention to the speaker diagram onscreen, and after completing everything a testing, I thought my sound was terrible. Then I realized it was a 6.1 setup not using a center channel. I reconfigured it to 7.1 and went through the configuration wizard again. The setup process for the Onkyo was interesting, as it comes with a wired microphone that plugs into the front of the unit. You are instructed to place the mic at ear height near the center of the room, then it goes through and sends sound to each speaker, automatically adjusting the dB level of each for the room. It did warn me that using only one rear speaker was not recommended, but still allowed me to complete the setup. The Onkyo boasts HDMI upconversion for analog signals, so I figured I'd put it to the test with an old Wii over component. Auto setup found all my HDMI devices with ease, but ran into problems with the Wii. Sound came through fine, but picture did not. The wizard told me to reset the Wii to 480i output, but I wasn't exactly sure how to do this so I moved on and will come back to it later. The blu-ray sound was good, but sound from the Dish Hopper was not so much. I'll have to play around with it to get it more to my liking, and to be fair I only spent 15 minutes flipping around looking for some content that would have some dynamic sound and landed on Aliens, which seemed to be lacking in using the sub properly.

Removed the X1 and mount, replaced with the QualGear mount and HT2050 - the new universal mount took some effort to get it aligned with the mounting holes in the HT2050, but to QualGear's credit the package included a range of screws in different sizes, and several different spacers to ensure the mount will hold the projector. The biggest concern I have is that the mount is well off of the center of the HT2050, and the weight of the projector lends to a "lean" that is tough to correct. The adjustment screws hold well when tightened, but getting a good level mount took several tries and I'm not sure it's precisely level yet. The design of the mount will make it easy to take down the PJ as needed since the bracket attached to the PJ "hooks" to the mounting base and is then tightened with two screws. I then connected the wireless WDP01 unit from BenQ, using the output from the Onkyo into the transmitter. The receiver unit mounts nicely to the HT2050, using a bracket that attaches with one screw to the side of the PJ and then a thumbscrew to attach the receiver to the bracket. It connects to the HT2050 via included short HDMI cable, and is powered by the HT2050 via an included USB cable. The wireless unit also comes with other ways to attach to older (or I assume non-BenQ) projectors and can be powered by an included AC adapter if needed. Turned on the projector, went through the brief setup wizard, and was presented with my first real impressions of the HT2050.

However, after getting it all connected and set up it was getting pretty late, so I only spent a few minutes looking at Tomorrowland on blu-ray, Aliens on Dish, and Nebraska-Oregon on Dish DVR. Picture is obviously overspilling my existing screen, but I was pleased with the picture quality where it hit the screen - and this is with no calibration whatsoever. I have downloaded the AVS 709 calibration disc and will use it to make improvements once my new screen is done. Tomorrowland looked really good, very crisp picture and good color balance. Blacks weren't great, but to be expected from the projector and existing screen combination. We'll see how that improves with the MaxxMudd screen. Aliens on Dish (I think it was on the Sundance channel in 1080p) also looked good for the few minutes I watched. Nebraska-Oregon from the Dish DVR (recorded from off ABC local in 1080p) also looked good - motion is still the weakness of any projector I've seen in person, especially compared to my 120hz LED TV. But it was certainly very watchable and looked significantly better than the image I got from the old X1. I should be able to get the ~145" diagonal 16:9 image I want with ease and may go slightly bigger.

I will say the BenQ wireless unit performed quite well. It's about 14' with direct line of sight between transmitter and receiver, so I'm sure that's helpful. It automatically established the wireless link on power-up, and since I'm only using one input (from the Onkyo AVR) it stayed locked on that signal, regardless of the source. I saw a couple brief dropouts right at the beginning of the Tomorrowland blu-ray, when the previews were playing and a new trailer would start, during the green rating screen it would glitch on green, drop, and then reconnect within 1-2 seconds. Concerned me at first, but then watched ~20 minutes of various scenes on the blu-ray with no further drops. I saw no drops on any of the Dish material, including the channel guide and DVR screens. Something I will keep an eye on though.

I picked up a fair bit of the painting supplies yesterday and hope to get some painting done over the next week. The wall paint surrounding the screen has been darkened to SW's Well-Bred Brown. Tonight I plan to pull down the old frame, fill and sand, then tape off the inside edge of my desired image. Later this week (Thursday/Friday) I'll paint the wall surrounding the new image area, and then hopefully start the priming and screen painting on the weekend. The metallic paints that I ordered from Amazon should be here tomorrow.

I forgot to snap some pictures last night but will get some tonight.
 

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I picked up a fair bit of the painting supplies yesterday and hope to get some painting done over the next week. The wall paint surrounding the screen has been darkened to SW's Well-Bred Brown. Tonight I plan to pull down the old frame, fill and sand, then tape off the inside edge of my desired image. Later this week (Thursday/Friday) I'll paint the wall surrounding the new image area, and then hopefully start the priming and screen painting on the weekend. The metallic paints that I ordered from Amazon should be here tomorrow.

I forgot to snap some pictures last night but will get some tonight.
Any progress ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I made a little progress tonight - nowhere near as much as I would have liked, but any progress is better than none! First off I got a shot (sorry it's fuzzy, was hard to hold the phone steady up on the stepladder) of the QualGear mount. You can see it's pretty far off center, but it seems to have held steady so far:



Here's a couple of the mounted projector - yes you see a component cable attached as for some reason the Onkyo won't upconvert the Wii image from either component or composite to HDMI. I triple-checked all the connections and made sure the Wii was set to 480i as was indicated by the Onkyo. All I get is resolution error, so I'll have to run the Wii picture over component using the existing in-wall component cable. I'm getting a short component cable to run from the ceiling to the projector.





Next I decided before I started any work on the screen wall I'd take some reference pictures of the existing screen - lighting is typical for movie watching, and you can see the white ceiling pretty well from the screen reflection. The image isn't bad, but of course too big for the existing screen:



Closer:



Off-axis:



Same shots with the sconce lighting up a bit as might be typical for watching football or gaming:




Next up, pull down the frame, sand rough spots, repair holes in drywall, and then sand everything smooth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I got the frame down and found only a few significant areas where holes need to be filled. I used long screws to hold the frame to the wall, with only two drywall anchors (wall-driller style) that left big holes to fill. I sanded the edges of the holes down, as well as the edge of the screen all the way around. Then I used the drywall joint compound to fill the holes and further smooth the edges where the existing screen meets the tan painted surface.

Then I took a flashlight and held it across the existing screen. Amazing how many very small paint imperfections existed on my "perfect" screen. My rolling efforts 12 years ago were nothing compared to how I'll proceed this time. I used the medium sanding sponge to smooth all of them I could find, and when I return tomorrow evening to sand the joint compound down, I'll double-check to make sure they're all gone.



Hopefully tomorrow I'll have time to sand everything smooth and begin marking off my image size for the screen. Got all the paint and accessories ready to go:

 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
This morning when I woke up I was thinking about next steps, and I decided it would be better to prime after getting the wall smoothed out. Originally I had thought I'd tape off the screen-to-be area and then paint the surrounding wall. However, I started thinking about taping, and decided the tape could do some damage if applied to the dry joint compound with no paint on it. So, now the plan is to sand and smooth the wall out, and then project my image on the wall, and prime the image area. I don't have to tape or worry too much about exceeding the image size, although I will take care to roll using the process and tips as outlined by Ftoast in post 1 of his great thread http://www.avsforum.com/forum/110-d...asy-ambient-light-rejecting-screen-paint.html.

Then after the primer is dry, I'll tape off the screen area and paint the wall. Then I'll reverse the taped area and paint the screen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Forgot how much dust gets kicked up when sanding drywall joint compound. Did a first rough sand (and then spent twice as much time vacuuming and cleaning up the dust). Fixed up a couple areas that needed some more mud and additional smoothing. Heading to Lowe's later today to pick up a drywall sanding sponge and will do a wet sand next to get it as smooth as possible in prep for priming. Hoping to prime in a couple days.
 

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Wet Sanding is a misnomer. "Slightly Dampened Sponge" would be more correct...and you must be careful. Use VERY light pressure and stop to clean accumulated debris off the sponge lest you start to "shovel" material ahead of you and start gouging the surface.

I am not sure where the idea was fostered that Wet Sanding was primarily for reducing Dust. Yes...it does control dust, but that is just a secondary trait. Wet Sanding is something that is used by Pro Finishers to achieve a ultra smooth surface quickly where existing Water Based Paint has Texture. If you wet sand Drywall compound, you'll melt it away very quickly. At most, a slightly dampened sponge is used "after" the coarse textured compound has been first sanded smooth.

The best way to hold dust in check is to not sand too aggressively. And if you do wet a sponge, only apply water in small amounts to the sanding surface....DO NOT IMMERSE THE SPONGE IN WATER THEN ATTEMPT TO SQUEEZE OUT THE EXCESS!!!

...it is seldom successful. Oh, it's not impossible...it's just not a Beginner's Tool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for the tip - I found several videos of people doing just what you suggested not to do - immersing the sanding sponge and running it over the surface aggressively, then squeezing it out in the water and repeating. The sanding sponge in one of the videos I saw looked like a green Brillo pad on one side with a sponge on the other. I thought that would just take all the mud right off so you've confirmed my belief! :D

The sponge I picked up is not that aggressive: http://www.lowes.com/pd/Armaly-ProPlus-4-25-in-x-9-in-Drywall-Finishing-Sponge-Hand-Sander/3665196. It's more designed to damp-smooth for a fine finish. A la this video:

I'm at the point where most of my significant rough spots are addressed from my initial sanding efforts, so it looks to me like I can use the damp sponge to smooth it further in conjunction with my broad knife to really make the surface smooth. And if I mess it up, well I have plenty more joint compound! :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Finally got the wall smoothed to my liking using the lightly dampened sponge. Primed the screen and made my first big mistake in the project. I was rolling the primer on from top to bottom and the lighting at the top of the wall is shaded just a bit due to the directional nature of the spotlights in the ceiling cans. So, I didn't realize there were 4-6 drips snaking their way down my smooth screen area, only to come back after an hour of drying and finding the nasty surprise when I used the flashlight. Scraped them off, lightly sanded, filled with more drywall compound, sanded again, and finally reprimed the entire area making sure not to allow any further dripping:



After the primer dried, I put an image up (the home screen of the AVS 709 calibration disc, which has a white background) to mark and tape off the image in order to paint the surrounding wall. Rather than bore you with the picture of the AVS disc screen, I switched over to MNF for a quick photo on the primed surface:



At this point I realized I have a lean in my projector, so I spent another good half hour adjusting. This is the stage where I realize my mount isn't the best for minute adjustments, and the fact that my projector attaches to the mount far off to one side likely helps the lean. After finally getting it straight the screen area is now taped off and ready for me to paint the surrounding wall. I'll be using Sherwin Williams Super Paint+Primer in flat Well-Bred Brown. The Super Paint is great for faster and more complete coverage and with the relatively small area I have surrounding the screen it shouldn't take long:



I hope to get this painting done over the next few evenings so I can paint the screen over the weekend. Not moving as fast as I'd like, but it is at least moving. Screen size should be close to 145".
 

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