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Hello, i am really new to the audio scene and i found something that has me really confused.

I am curious with knowing how loud (dB) something is going to be at a certain distance.i have found several online calculators to help and will be reasonable ( not going for high accuracy).

The problem is that i have noticed some speakers when providing the SPL data its at a different units such as dB (at) 1W/0.5m or some in centimeters! how would i go about using this data to the standard dB (at) 1W/1m ? Since most of the calculators i have found require the standardized input, i am not sure what to do with the non standard specs

Thanks.
 

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Hello, i am really new to the audio scene and i found something that has me really confused.



I am curious with knowing how loud (dB) something is going to be at a certain distance.i have found several online calculators to help and will be reasonable ( not going for high accuracy).



The problem is that i have noticed some speakers when providing the SPL data its at a different units such as dB (at) 1W/0.5m or some in centimeters! how would i go about using this data to the standard dB (at) 1W/1m ? Since most of the calculators i have found require the standardized input, i am not sure what to do with the non standard specs



Thanks.

Search up SPL calc and just convert the 1m numbers to 0.5m. Speaker companies do this so their specs look comparable or better than legitimate speakers which measure using the industry standard (ie 1 watt/1 meter).
 

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I have never seen 1W/0.5m but I will say that I never really look at that in detail... I just see 85, 89, 91, etc and just figure they are using the standard.
Maybe this is what is used for near field monitors?
 

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Double the distance = 3db loss. Add a wall = 3db gain. Double the amount of (equal) subs = 6db gain.

Full space = anechoic chamber (theroretically in free air)

1/2 space = speaker on the ground in an open field
1/4 space = speaker placed to a wall
1/8 space = speaker placed in a corner


You often see sensitivity ratings at either 1W/m or at 2.83V/m which equals 1W on an 8Ohm driver.
Max SPL is usually full space or half space (often at 2m which is comparable to full space).

Manufacturers who want to boast with high numbers often use questionable tactics to get to their goal, like using 1/8 space @ 1m with two cabs (as seen on the Klipsch website..).
For example, 120db 1/8 space at 1m with two cabs would be equal to 105db full space (1m, 1 cab), because you substract 9db from 1/8 space to full space and substract another 6db from the second cab.


These values are all theoretical and real world results may differ greatly, as you might get 10db gain by adding a second sub but you might also lose all the bass (at certain frequencies) with bad placement.
 
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