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I have finally started my new theater. Although I have a measly budget ($8000) I have high hopes that the theater will be a great success. I have basically decided that my number one goal is having a nice , comfortable room with good design rather then make the room look like a dwarf sized multiplex. I think after I have finished I will look at room nodes , acoustics etc.


I feel that due to the birth of a new son that I have to save for college rather then go crazy about picture quality. Initially I was going to have an all black room but I am backing of that as too uncomfortable. Maybe just the screen wall will be black.


In any case I have learnt a sh#tload from you guys and appreciate it. I will always know that my theater is compromised thanks your fanactical expertise. My theater will be the porsche boxster of the theater world not the ferarri.


My one piece of advice to prospective builders is to initially get in an architect or designer to help out. I did and it really helped.
 

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Charlies,

Well, if you've been here a while, you already know that the one thing this band of madmen lack is attitude. Build your room the way YOU want it, and make sure you have fun doing it.


Equipment can always be upgraded later, but your kids only grow-up once. We're looking forward to hearing stories of your progress.
 

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I too agree have fun with the room.


I would not do a black room. As you can see mine is a nice grey carpet, black carpetted front wall and a dark grey ceiling. This was really not that expensive.


One comment though. Room modes are really a function of dimension and those become generally fixed once construction begins. So give that some thought before driving the first nail.


Jim Mc

"The Stargate"

http://albums.photopoint.com/j/Album...&sp=1&vt=vpall
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi Jim


Its funny you posted because your theater is one which I really like. I wanted to ask you how you built your component cupboard as I would like to replicate it.
 

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Charlies,


Well thanks for your interest and I am glad you like our theater. THe rack I built is really a low budget project that came out good. It does what I need looks fine and was cheap. The rack actually is into the wall and accessable from a closet it opens into that was built for this purpose. Please let me know if the description is unclear.


Sorry for the delay in getting back to you. I got knocked off when the board was down and have been busy since.


Jim Mc

"The Stargate"

http://albums.photopoint.com/j/Album...&sp=1&vt=vpall





THE EQUIPMENT RACK


The rack is a basic carpentry project. The walls were framed using 2x4 construction and a 62â€H x 21â€W opening was framed 6†off the floor. I then built two sidewalls 14†back from the main wall at 90 degree. This is like building a closet but with no back. The rear of this rack is accessible from a closet whose door is in the adjoining bar area. The closet basically built to access the rear of the gear and an even more hidden mechanical area in an inner sealed and insulated room is painted black so no wires show through the rack from reflected light. The closet was also built with one wall at 45 degree to reduce resonance. A base was then built inside the cabinet at the 6†level. The theater floor is raised so it appears less than 6â€. This base must be level and the walls straight and plumb. A top was framed at 68†from the floor. The interior of the cabinet was a simple box of MDF, medium density fiberboard. MDF is smooth and paints well. If you look at my Lobby pics the Marquee is all built using MDF. The edges are hard to get smooth but the flat surface is like glass. The box measured 62â€tall x 21â€wide x 18†deep on the outside of the box. The box was made out of ½†MDF if you use ¾†MDF you will need to reduce the shelf widths by a ½â€. (Note: Be sure all of your gear will fit in the box size you plan. Check widths, depth and total height. Add the gear heights plus 2†minimum per piece for shelf and air space more for amps. Also factor in a slight fudge factor for getting the support into the right slot on the shelf standard. As you can see I placed 10 pieces of gear into this rack.) The left and right sides each had 2 vertical channels routed in them one 3†from the front and the other 2†from the back. The channels were 5/8†wide x 3/16†deep and ran the 62†height, use the shelf standards you buy as the guide here. I am talking about the shelf standards with short horizontal slots every inch that use the ¾ x ¾ flat tabs sticking out. If you don’t know what I am talking about the people in the Depot cabinet area will. The box was assembled using biscuit joinery but that was by choice not necessity. The box was slid into the opening for which it was built. The MDF box’s front edge was even with the wall’s drywall face. Behind each channel back up framing was in place, a 2x4. Then the regular Home Depot brass shelf standards were inserted into the routed channels and secured with screws every 6â€. I made shelves from ¾†MDF and rolled the front and back edge by making a top and bottom pass on a router table. I made most of the shelves 19 7/8†x 17†and a couple of extras 19 7/8†x 19 7/8†just in case I bought something deeper later. All of the MDF was painted with a sealer, and three coats of gloss black enamel don’t use flat. The flat black shows every mark is impossible to clean and will not hold up. The gloss black in this area has not been an issue. The shelves were placed about an inch back from the face of the box. Our theater walls are carpeted. The carpet is put up with wallpaper adhesive and covers all the walls. It runs past the drywall and onto the edge of the MDF box. I then placed a ¾†by ¾†outside corner molding over the carpet edge and MDF to give a clean finish. I tested window casing but it looked way out of scale and did not provide the same finished look as the ¾ outside corner molding. This is the molding visible in the photo.

Well that’s it. I hope the directions are helpful, as it’s pretty basic. I spent maybe $50 total to build this rack.
 
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