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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We all should be contacting our state and local consumer fraud bureaus to alert them that current HDTV "ready" or "capable" sets that are sitting on showroom floors (or being shipped) are NOT hdtv ready.


The states may take action to have the sets removed from the stores or require a large display stating that the sets ARE NOT HDTV ready!

 

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While it is de-facto fraud that is happening right now in CE stores throughout the nation (should MPAA succeed with HDCP/DVI), it is in our best interests for the public to continue buying analog-input-only HDTV sets.


The more of us have such sets, the least likely MPAA is to succeed.

HDCP/DVI will then die the same DIVx death. I hope Circuit

City story gave every CE chain & manufacturer a good lesson: we are not likely to shell money for limited/controlled pay-per-view crap.

 

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Rashid, though your logic makes sense, I think it would make us no better then the places selling the electronics if we DID NOT inform the public.


------------------

STOP DVI/HDCP!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am afraid that this issue is similar but not on point with DIVX. DIVX was competing with an open system that already existed. There were far more non-DIVX title than DIVX titles. DIVX, with few exceptions, could only be bought at circuit city. Circuit City owned a large part of DIVX. Best Buy and the other electronics retailers were not going to support their competitor. The DIVX system was full of glitches. It required an installation with a modem.


Our situation is different. Not many people have HDTV or STBs. More importantly there is not a great deal of content out there. When the content providers increase HDTV programming of all kinds, the public will be interested. The ability to control their viewing will not be as obvious as DIVX. The public will buy these systems no knowing what they are giving up.


That is why I think it is important to go to State Consumer Fraud Bureaus. Selling a set as HDTV capable with analog inputs etc. is FRAUD. I think the States will take action.


While the States are taking action, the public will be educated at the same time about what is going to happen to all of us. Nobody will be happy when they realize they are losing their right to copy or even watch a particular entertainment or educational program.
 

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I still like Rashid's logic. it worked in the early history of Color TV.


In 1951, the FCC approved CBS's non-compatable field-sequential color system as the national standard. The rest of the industry, led by RCA, got Congress to stall the manufacture of color sets on the basis of Korean War shortages. Two years later, the number of B&W sets in homes had increased by several orders of magnitude, and the idea of rolling out an incompatable color system was unthinkable.


The FCC reversed itself and adopted NTSC.


It's going to be 2 years before the hardware folks get their product lines switched over to protection-compliant gear. In the meantime, if programming like this fall's CBS college football, more prime time HD on NBC/ABC, etc. gets several million more homes watching HD, there will be a much better chance of generating REAL PR backlash or legal action when Hollywood or whoever attempts to pull the plug.


Face it, 100,000 angry guys on the tweak fringe aren't even a speed bump in the eyes of the entertainment industry.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Spoffo:
It's going to be 2 years before the hardware folks get their product lines switched over to protection-compliant gear.
It looks like the hardware folks have know about it for two or three years at least. They are probably just doing minor tweaks to their equipment to implement the latest changes that were accepted by all those companies.


It would not surprise me if multiple companies are showing their new 5C / DVI equipment at the very next trade show.
 

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Guys, DVI/HDCP isn't the one that's going to limit resolution on analog outputs -- DTCP is the one to watch.


DVI/HDCP is simply an encrypted digital interconnect. DTCP is more likely to be used in the actual HD distribution stream, so we're going to have to contend with its license agreement if the "protection" bit gets set by the content providers...
 
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