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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did some searching on this and found a couple different responses so I figured I'd post my scenario and see what people have to say about it.


Here is a picture of the room as it stands right now...(actually the whole room has rigid insulation on the walls now but still need to be framed)




When I moved into this house there was a wall built underneath the beam with 2x4's but the header on the wall that was glued to the beam was narrower than the beam so his drywall bowed out around the beam. I removed the wall so I could do it right and now I'm not sure how to proceed.


Obviously I can't use a 2x4 since I'll run into the same problem as the previous owner did. So what are my options?


2x6 header? would I still use 2x4's for the studs? or would I need to use 2x6's for the entire wall?


would the 2x6 be wider than the beam? if so would one side of the 2x6 need to be flush with the edge of the beam or centered on the beam?


any other methods I could use?
 

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You could do a 2x6 header with 2x6 studs or 2x6 header with 2x4s in a staggered stud config.


The only way to tell if a 2x6 would be wider than the beam would be to measure the beam.



As for which side (if any) should be flush with the beam... do you have any soffits planned? This could impact that derision.
 

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First off that is not a header! It is a top plate! A header is placed above an opening, like a door, or window. It is typically two 2x6s or larger placed on its edge resting on jack studs.


Now, there are several ways to combat the beam. You could build a wall on each side of the beam, you could build a staggered stud wall like jamis mentions, or you can use soffits to go around the beam. Depends on the look you are after and your goals for the area.
 

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I had the same situation in my basement. In my case, the beam was 5 3/8" wide, which allowed a 2x6 to fit perfectly underneath of it. There was also a 2x6 plate on top of the I beam in my case, supporting the floor joists. So I built a 2x6 wall underneath the beam and will be able to put drywall up to the ceiling, completely concealing the beam without using soffits. Sorry I don't have any pictures at the moment, but I may be able to post some later if you'd like.


-haZZard
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by haZZardUNL /forum/post/15562203


I had the same situation in my basement. In my case, the beam was 5 3/8" wide, which allowed a 2x6 to fit perfectly underneath of it. There was also a 2x6 plate on top of the I beam in my case, supporting the floor joists. So I built a 2x6 wall underneath the beam and will be able to put drywall up to the ceiling, completely concealing the beam without using soffits. Sorry I don't have any pictures at the moment, but I may be able to post some later if you'd like.


-haZZard

Looking at the picture closely... it looks like that may be the case here as well with a 2x6 (or some other piece of lumber) on top of the beam.
 

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are both side of the room planned to be finished, or will you leave one side unfinished while the theater would be on the other side?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by smakovits /forum/post/15563176


are both side of the room planned to be finished, or will you leave one side unfinished while the theater would be on the other side?

both sides will be finished, the far side will be a workout type area and some storage and the side closest to us in the picture will be the main area. I'll have to measure exactly but if a 2x6 fits then I might just go that route, 2x6 TOP PLATE
and 2x6 studs.


would there be a benefit to using a soffit?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2panther /forum/post/15566058


both sides will be finished, the far side will be a workout type area and some storage and the side closest to us in the picture will be the main area. I'll have to measure exactly but if a 2x6 fits then I might just go that route, 2x6 TOP PLATE
and 2x6 studs.
There you go!

Quote:
would there be a benefit to using a soffit?

A soffet allows you to run things like HVAC, electrical, speaker wires, etc. If you truly want to isolate the room as best as possible it is best to install the soffet after the room is constructed and sealed. In other words you build a "normal" room, then build the soffet.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamis /forum/post/15560738


You could do a 2x6 top plate with 2x6 studs or 2x6 top plate with 2x4s in a staggered stud config.


The only way to tell if a 2x6 would be wider than the beam would be to measure the beam.



As for which side (if any) should be flush with the beam... do you have any soffits planned? This could impact that decision.

I agree with the 2x6 top plate and staggered 2x4s so you could isolate the sound better. Which side of the picture are you putting the theater? If the I-beam will be on the edge of the room, then just make sure the top plate is flush with the theater room side of it. You are luck, I have a duct on one side and I-beam on the other side of the room. Each one is about 2ft - 3ft from the side walls. I built soffits around each one also allowing for some indirect lighting.



 
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