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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Normally I would build my 2x4 walls with what I'll call a "fire stop" half way up and between the stud. This connects the two studs and reduces twisting (harder to twist ~48 inches of 2x4 than ~96).


With HT in mind would this be detrimental for non-staggered wall construction?


And... for a non load bearing wall what are thoughts on a single top and bottom plate ?
 

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These are just my own thoughts and opinions.


I would think that adding your firestop would cause more sound to transfer out of the room since most of the sound transfers through the studs. The more wood surface touching the drywall, the more sound transfer to other rooms.


And aren't you supposed to have a single top and bottom plate in every wall? I thought that was code. Maybe I am misunderstanding the last question.
 

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Sound either has to leave or kept in the room.

Adding fire stop might add to the rigidity of the wall in the middle, but I prefer a little sound transfer (if any) vs resonance added to my bass. I have not done the fire stop yet, but I like a room that is stiff and use some means of obsorption after dry wall.
 

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Greetings,


By opting for a non staggered wall, or the better yet, double wall approach, I am assuming the transmission of sound into other areas is not your highest priority. No?


The fire blocking is a good idea, if not the law, that out weighs any extra amount of leakage.


I have never seen double bottom plate.

I have seen single top plate though: heck, all I have to do is look over my shoulder. I would use double plate if I had it to do over again.

Mine is an old place with gobs of shifting.


Enjoy, jdb
 

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I would do a double top plate, it leaves more room for the screws at the top of the drywall after putting the ceiling drywall up.


As for the "fire stops", they do add rigidity to the walls, which will help reduce any resonance. You can even do them in a staggered wall, you just need to turn them on their side. Of course they are not much use as "fire sotps" then, but they do increase the rigidity. I can't even imagine how you would do a real fire stop in a staggered wall without defeating the purpose of the staggering.


I imagine they do add to the sound transmission slightly. I'm going to be putting them in, but I'm doing a room in a room so transmission should be well controlled (I hope!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Everyone, Thanks for the input.


The room will be in the basement so on the other side are concrete walls. I'm assuming some sound leakage will be OK. I'll insulate the cavity leading to the floor above.


I plan on connecting the top of the HT wall to the concrete wall top plate with some form of isolation clip to isolate it from the floor joist above. Seeing as the contact points will be spaced out I was wondering if a double top plate would reduce any "wave" in the wall over time.


Q: If it would help the "fire stop" could be back set 1/4" so as not to contact the dry wall. Would this reduce sound transmission over a flush mount ? Any thoughts ?
 

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I would not put the fire stops 1/4" back from the drywall, since it is the drywall you are trying to make more rigid in the first place. The studs will be plenty rigid (side to side) once the drywall is applied. They will help reduce the twist in the studs, but that is not a major issue if you properly toenail your studs with three screws top and bottom (two on one side, one in the middle on the other side). The resonance you are trying to stop is mostly from the drywall vibrating.


Using isolation clips will help reduce sound transmission. it sounds like you are building a room in a room after all. At least with the wall. Are you building a 2x4 wall next to a concrete wall? If so, leave an inch or so gap and stuff full of insulation.


Do you have the headroom to add joists for a lowered ceiling on top of this wall. You will get substantially less sound transmission upstairs this way. You only need a few inches is you stagger your joists between the existing joists. It is one of the best ways to reduce sound transmission. (Take it away Ted White! ;))
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
cgblack,


Unfortunately not :(, I agonized for at least 6 months on how to obtain the holy grail room within a room or floating ceiling. I just have too many things in the way (HVAC, water, central vac).


I thought about a high quality acoustic suspended ceiling but the area I need to cover looks to exceed $10K based on some quick pricing.


So I'm at resilient channel isolation clips and Sheetrock. This is my starter HT. Maybe once the kids are out of the house and if I get the bug real bad I'll just tear down and go dedicated room within a room.


Could be worse I could be E.Martin, then again he might make out pretty good on his situation.
 
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