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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,


I just thought I'd drop by with a few pictures and impressions of the Stryke 15.4 sub project that I have just completed. This is my first DIY sub project, so many tools were purchased and I really enjoyed the project.


I will list below some of the links and pictures that helped me complete this project. I started off with the HE15 drivers & SAPR 18 passive radiators from Stryke. I then got the plans for the enclosure from the site as well. I guess I spent about 20-25 hrs to complete the project. I wired all the connections to this input plate purchased from Parts Express. All 4 voice coils were hook to the plate with 12 gauge wire. I then used a couple of small pieces to make jumpers to present a 2 ohm load to each of the two channels of my Cinepro amp which should provide about 900 watts to each driver for a total of 1800 watts. Here a couple of my photos.

Constuction

Constuction



Constuction




Constuction


In Room Finished


The sub has been turned 45 degees to the corner and sounds much better.


I also purchased a Behringer Feed Back Destroyer which is IMO is a must to get proper sound from the sub. I found a wealth of info at Sonnie Parkers site on using the BFD .......well worth the time if you never used this type of equipment. The one thing I did is to do nearfield measurement and adjust from that point. I need to take a hard look at some room treatments to tame some peaks and nulls at my listening position.

Measurements without BFD & with BFD

Measurements

Settings on BFD


Well, I guess the main thing is that I am very, very happy with the sound of the HE15.4 and the impact of the bass during movies is incredible. Music bass is tight and sounds very good to my ears. I hope that you can find some useful info in this post.......it has been fun. :)


Many thanks to Bob Sorel who got me going and has helped me along the way with a lot of private emails and my non stop questions. Also, thanks to Jon and ThomasW.


Rick
 

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RickS-


Good job.


So what would you say was your total investment? (Including finishing)


What did you use to finish it with? Did you use bisquits joinery?


That BFD looks like it worked wonders, wow.


Regards, Bruce
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bruce,


Well, the finishing isn't much........I just went down to Home Depot and bought a can of primer/sealer and a quart of lamp black oil based paint and rolled it on.


I think I've got about $1350-$1400 with the BFD into the project........not counting the tools which will be used for many years to come.


The plan is really a box on top of a box. The first box is assembled with drywall screws and polyurethane adhesive. The second box on top is glued to the first box with yellow wood glue.


Rick
 

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Rick-


Thanks for the info - not bad $ for what you end up with, eh!


Now, you just created another question, Why two types of glue? and did you dampen the surfaces before using the Polyurethane glue?


Also, am I correct in seeing that the two woofers are on opposite sides in the upper half of cabinet, and PR's are in lower half (all the way around)?


Bruce


EDIT: I think I just answered my last question with another look at your links. 2 PR & 2 Woofers + 2 PR
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Bruce,


The picture above shows the sub upside down glueing the bottom on.


The polyurhethane is very strong for butt joints at the corners and with screws and clamps was rock solid......I also used it to caulk all inside corners. The yellow wood glue is thinner and seems to work better for laminating the flat panels together. The 4 PR's are in the upper and lower area opposite of each other, and the drivers are opposite of each other in the upper part of the enclosure.


Rick
 

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Rick-


FYI


The reason I asked about dampening the surfaces prior to using polyurethane glue is that this type of glue is partially cured by moisture (& humidity), and especially when dealing with very dry manmade sheet goods (such as MDF) the moist surfaces provide a stronger bond. (acts as a catalyst).


Tests that I have performed in the past (as well as others I know) where edge joining hardwoods (kiln dried to 6-8%) together using polyurethane glues failed pretty easily without pre-moistening the surfaces first. And there was a big difference in the joint integrity of the moistened samples. The test failures broke 100% along the joint line (bad bond).


The moisture curing actually causes the glue to swell slightly (which is a good thing for gap filling).


I know you said this was your first sub project, so I'll bet you're a big fan of MDF dust now, right? :D


Anyway, double layered it ain't going anywhere, thanks for sharing the project with us.


Bruce
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Bruce,

Quote:
I know you said this was your first sub project, so I'll bet you're a big fan of MDF dust now, right?
Yeah.........one of the new tools I bought was a Dewalt 621 router with dust collection. Hooked up to the Fein vaccum that switches on as soon as the router/table saw starts really helped contol the dust. Thanks for the info on the glue, I hope I don't blow the thing apart!! ;)


Rick
 

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Nice post, Rick!


Yes, this sure has been a long road indeed, heh?


Rick, in case you are not aware, Bruce is a fine wood craftsman and from the posts that I have read, he really knows his stuff. I didn't know about dampening the surfaces before using the polyurethane glue, but it sure will be a tip I will remember in the future (well, actually, right now as I build my current Lambda Unity Horn project :) ). I sure wish Bruce had been around while I was learning the ropes of this craft!


The cabinet, complete with the drivers and PRs, weighs in at about 350 pounds, and the "box within a box" construction makes for a pretty solid solid enclosure, even without the use of biscuit joints. Don't forget, the entire box is constructed of 1.5" thick MDF (2 layers of .75" laminated together), which was glued, screwed, and clamped on all bonded surfaces. And being so darned heavy, you'd have to move it before you could break it!


This was Rick's first DIY project, and I have to give him a lot of credit. For a person who has never done anything even remotely close to this, the dual HE 15 enclosure can be a fairly intimidating task. But Rick wasn't afraid of the job, and he dug right in and got the job done very very well. I followed this project with even more pictures than he has posted, and his techniques and precision in his woodworking look like the work of a much more seasoned craftsman. Nice job, Rick!


Rick also got a quick education on the proper setup of a subwoofer. A lot of people mistakenly think that all you have to do is throw it into a corner, hook it up to your system, set the general bass level with your pre/pro or reciever, and your done with it. Nothing could be further from the truth, as I am sure that a lot of people here know. Subs play havoc in different rooms, and a parametric EQ is almost a necessity to get the most out of ANY sub. Leveling the in room response is a huge job, but well worth the effort to get the best performance possible.


Ever since I got my dual HE 15 completed, along with a Crown K2 to drive it, and a BFD for EQ, I finally found my Holy Grail of subwoofers. This is simply the finest sub I have ever heard, at any price, and I have heard many many competitors. I know that there is a contingent of people who dislike passive radiator designs, but I feel that they have unnecessarily given a black eye to very good design. Oh well, everyone is entitled to their own opinion. But if you are interested in a very high output subwoofer in the smallest possible package, that can reach down to 20 hz without even breaking a sweat, then a dual HE 15 (or Blueprint 1503) passive radiator design really should be on your short list.
 

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Wow thanks Bob,


Oh! I hope nobody took me wrong, Looks great Rick!


The neat thing about doing projects like this or even building your own home theater is it's a great way to sneak more tools in the garage, for future use (SAF issues). Funny you mention the router and Fein dust extractor. One of my favorite 'systems' is the 'Festo' with similar triggered extraction capabilities.


Question for either of you, do you OR what do you use inside the enclosure as far as damping materials?


Bruce
 

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Quote:
Question for either of you, do you OR what do you use inside the enclosure as far as damping materials?
Inside the cabinet we line the top, bottom, and the solid walls under the 2 drivers with foam rubber cut from a matress pad, about 2 inches thick. Then we fill the corners loosely with polyfil. In this particular design, you don't want to overdamp. There are many more expensive and exotic materials that can be used, like Black Hole, but for the DIY'er, these cheap products do the job just fine and can be purchased at your local Walmart :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hey, Bob!


Thanks very much for the comments above! I am now getting very interested in some woodworking projects and have started converting my garage into a workshop............have to do something with all those new tools. :) My wife gives up already.............I just blame it on you :D ;)


Seriously thanks for all your help!


Rick
 

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BobS
Quote:
I know that there is a contingent of people who dislike passive radiator designs, but I feel that they have unnecessarily given a black eye to very good design.
Gee I wonder who you're referring to? :D


Funny thing, we took a BP1503 and put it in a Stryke cube (the one we gutted when making the AS-15) and it sounded pretty darn good. Actually far better than the HE15 did in the same cube.


Go figure.......



RickS


Jon and I were glad to be of assistance ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thomas,


Thanks for the comments! Its nice to have such a varied group of people and idea's to rely on when undertaking a project like this one. :) This is by far the best bass I have ever listened to in my HT...............but, thats this week. ;)


Rick
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Thomas-W
Funny thing, we took a BP1503 and put it in a Stryke cube (the one we gutted when making the AS-15) and it sounded pretty darn good. Actually far better than the HE15 did in the same cube.


Go figure.......
What is interesting about this observation is the comparison of the two drivers. The BP1503 makes for a more heavily damped response. In the case of the comparison between a ported and PR system, the PR system will usually have higher Q for the same box volume and tuning. This can be for a variety of reasons, including the Fp of the PR itself, and the fact that stuffing the enclosure makes for a more effective isothermal operation more like that of a sealed box than a ported box. I guess it shows that we can be rather sensitive to changes in resonances even at rather low frequencies.


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Rick,

Very nice subwoofer! And it's amazing what you were able to achieve with the BFD. How did you get your BFD; what's the best way to buy one?


Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Dave,


Thanks for the comments. I purchased the BFD from my local dealer here in Canada. If you do a google search I was able to find quite a few music shops that have it for around $130.00. It seems like the different designs have there own following but, for the most part all that I,ve talked to agree that a parametric EQ is very important to the subwoofer sounding the best it can.


Mark,


Very interesting! The one thing that I did do was to fill the complete inside loosely with fiberfill as well as line the walls with pyramid style foam.



Rick
 
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