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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So...how many of you have ever auditioned studio monitors? Which ones? What did you think? They are designed to be clear and very flat (the good ones are).


I am in and out of a lot of recording studios and music stores that sell mid line to very high end recording equipment. I see alot of Genelec, Tannoy, JBL, Dynaudio, Yamaha, KRK, Event, Mackie.
 

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Hi mdrums,


I am not an audiophile or a videophile and never pretend to be, but I have great enthusiasm for the technology and I love to hear good music and watch good quality pictures. Therefore some answers I give have an excited almost childlike enthusiasm attached to them however this may be some help.


Until recently I had a surround sound system built up of genelec speakers, the sound was ultra detailed and the treble was a little bit bright. However the bass and the overall quality of the sound was execptional.


That was until I heard the Dynaudio Acoustics AIR system a month ago. Comprising of 3 AIR25s L/C/R, 4 AIR6s and 2 AIRBASE 24 subwoofers. These are truly exceptional speakers. Very fast taught bass, crisp clear mid, and fantastic treble not bright just brilliant. Just a fantastic overall package.


So far (in ranked order) out of Dynaudio, ATC, Genelec, Bluesky, JBL, MKSOUND and Tannoy monitor packages this is easily the best.


For further information go to www.dynaudioacoustics.com , www.atc.gb.net , www.genelec.com and http://www.abluesky.com .


Thats all pretty high end equipment - dynaudio package mentioned is @$35,000


But if you want a great sounding system for @$5,000 - $7,500 look no further than the Bluesky system one with 5 or 7 of the SAT6.5 and 1 or 2 of the SUB12s.
 

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What he said. In fact it was funny, about 12 years ago I was at an audio show locally with a fellow sound contractor (I install commercial sound systems for a living as well as repairing video projectors).


After listening to many high end audiophile systems, those 8 watt single ended amps, speaker brand names we'd never heard of, etc, he commented that he'd much rather have a pair of ElectroVoice 1202's in his living room than any of the stuff he heard.


What you will probably find is that a lot of the studio stuff is very flat sounding, because these studio monitors indeed have a very flat frequency response. A common case in point is the Yamaha NS-10 near field monitor speakers that were very popular. A lot of home studio guys use(d) them, and would end up mixing an overly bass heavy mix, as the monitors would not give a very punchy bass sound. Once you listened to the mix on (low end) ghetto blasters or a typical rawk home stereo, the amount of bass was insane.


In general, I do like studio monitor speakers. One of my faves is still the JBL 4311, but I guess that one falls way under the $20K forum as decent pairs are about $400.00 on the Bay.


Curt
 

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I like the Mackie HR824 (I think that is the model) very much, which is less than $1k per speaker, and for home theater, is pretty darn hard to beat. It does raise issues with how to connect everything together, as these are powered... you could just run out and buy a pre-pro with balanced outs and run a bunch of those cables instead of speaker wire. In general active speakers tend to be much more dynamic to my ears than passive speakers in the midrange. This is subjective, I know, but my impression nonetheless.


Also no grills can be a factor.


If I used box speakers these would be at the top of my list to audition before buying.
 

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I also love studio monitors. I have PMC IB2's and they are truly awesome. They disappear in my room, image like crazy, are very musical and the transmission line design delivers exceptionally tight/deep bass. Also, they perform well for all types of music. If you have eclectic taste in music like I do, this is a real bonus. They partner well with Bryston SST amps.


The downside is that they are not pretty like many other high end speakers. Personally I like the look of them in their studio black finish and this works well if you are also into HT - besides I'd rather put my money into the quality of the speaker than the quality of the finish.
 

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would anyone like to share their experience with TAD speakers?
 

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Be aware that some monitors are designed for near field listening (2-3 feet away) and others are meant for more conventional room use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Correct Greg! However in most famliy room style home theaters these studio monitors do very very well. Especially thes less expensive ones that are sold at Guitar Center or Sam Ash.

I am just trying to see what some think, feel or have heard about professional sound recording studio monitors. I know what I think and have listened to many of them. rideflytx, yep those Mackie's are killer!
 

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I've been using 3 HR824's as my mains for a few years now with no itch to upgrade. I run them balanced out of my pre/pro.


The only negatives I've gotten from a few audiophile friends is that in 2-channel, there is a lack of depth in sound stage... wide but shallow. I don't know the science behind that. I've tried to get an understanding of the pro's and con's of using near field monitors for HT applications but seems like no one definitively knows. Si just oing by my experience, I have no compliants. they sound better than my b&w 805's I used to run so I'm happy.
 

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I think there's only a few general downsides to pro monitors (besides being generally unattractive)


1. They tend to value FR accuracy over every other aspect of performance.


2. They are relatively limited production compared to stuff sold in stores so they tend to be more expensive for what you get.


Of course, that's a generalization and you will get many studio monitors that just paste many home speakers (and vice versa)


Pocoloco - there's no accepted "standard" of how speakers are supposed to image - width vs depth or anything. All you can do is see if it sounds right. I guess my own personal standard is simply whether I can hear where the speakers are when I close my eyes.


One good test though, is to get or make a CD that has the same track on both channels. Then play it on your speakers. If everything sounds like its coming from the middle, then the speaker's not adding distortion that gives you any illusions that aren't supposed to be there. And if you move off axis, if the center image slowly drifts to one side, rather than suddenly collapsing, then it's got good dispersion.


I heard some speakers that literally threw one of two triangles about 5' to the left of the speaker, but only that one. That was an artifact, not good imaging. Audiophiles are generally arguing over width vs depth, forwardness vs having instruments seem more distance. Width often has to do with either a foward tonal balance or very wide dispersion. Depth is often produced by a warmer speaker with less dispersion. Or by a speaker that bounces sound off the back wall. There's no "right" answer and every speaker will give a different presentation and every room will contribute differently to that presentation. IOW, it doesn't make sense to complain about lack of depth, because it's about the same as complaining that Al Di Meola doesn't sound like Santana and therefore isn't as good.
 

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im running a pair of JBL 6802's active monitors for my front L/R. h/k receiver to BBE unit, to these JBL's. sounds great. i've mixed with the same pair of monitors for years, so im pretty darn used to them. also have a buddy of mine using Mackie HR824 for front and rear (center and sub were something else, dont remember now) and i liked that system too. as for comparison, you have to go listen for yourself, i like mine a lot.


the only draw back is that you have to turn them on/off, but mine are active, i suppose you wouldnt have to do that with passive monitors.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg_R
Be aware that some monitors are designed for near field listening (2-3 feet away) and others are meant for more conventional room use.


Some large speakers as well such as the Dunlavys are actually near field monitors. It always amazes me that some people use such speakers for home theater (Widescreen).
 

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That is the opposite of what I've heard. I've heard the dunlavy's are designed with very flat 6db/oct crossovers, and as such, need more distance from the unit to let all the drivers mix. Just what I've heard.
 

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How you do figure Dunlavy's are "near field" monitors? With a 1st order, WMTMW configuration, you'd need to be 8'-10' away before they'd start to sound right.


(edit) Huh, they say great minds think alike, but what if they also think coincidentally? :)
 

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I never thought I'd find myself posting in the Ultra Hi-End Gear board, but I just wanted to jump in and chalk up another one for the Mackie HR series studio monitors. I have a 7.1 setup with all Mackie HRxxx monitors and they exceded my expectations from day 1. The term "Nearfield" always scares people away who don't really understand what it means. My listening position is 12 feet away and it's not a problem in the least. The $ky is the limit for studio monitors. The Mackies are a great bargain and worth time listening to.


Dr V
 

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Dunlavy's are to be listened to 8 to 10 feet away but the SC-I and SC-IAV were used for near field monitoring in quite a few studios.


Rufugio (or whoever you are?) ---- How you came to the conclusion that Dunlavy's are not meant to be used in HT is beyond me and totally incorrect. You clearly have never spent any time with them. I was a Dunlavy dealer for 5 years and still own SC-VI's (and SC-IVA's for the rears). Still the best HT I have ever heard at any price.
 

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I use pro monitors (SPL Runts) at $2800 each. After installing and EQing these, I feel I could never go back to conventional speakers again. EQ and a treated room are a must to tame them.
 

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As was mentioned studio monitors are made to be very flat so that they don't color the sound. This is a must for recording studios when mixing for all the various playback systems.


I would think they would work fantastic in a HT enivironment. I've always found studio monitors to be more detailed than similarly price HT speakers. When I got my Tannoy Actives for my home recording studio the clarity was evident. You could hear things that I couldn't before. Even down to the reverb type.


In a HT environment, I'm sure they would bring out all the nuances and little details in the sound.
 

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I recently replaced my Dynaudio Confidence C1's with Bluesky Sat 6.5's and I am very happy with them. Though the 6.5's are not quite as good as the Dyn's, they come remarkably close for a fraction of the cost. I have also added three more of them for HT and they are fantastic for movies. Very detailed and dynamic with very wide dispersion.


They are certainly not pretty, but they are well built with 3/4" MDF and 1" thick front and rear baffles.


I'm a big fan of the active design approach and I'd like to see more speaker companies develop active models. How about Wilson X-2's with built-in Boulder amps? :)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottielee
would anyone like to share their experience with TAD speakers?


their 16" speaker ($775 one) is simply put one of two of the best loudspeakers currently in production


their compression drivers are also top of the line
 
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