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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I've read two things about the RTV 4000 series that got me to thinking:


1) They got that ethernet connection

2) Someone said you can mount it as a share on your PeeCee


Then there's the constant among all recent ReplayTVs:


Big honking hard drive.


Stupid things to do with your RTV-4000 if the above are true (and the share is writable):


- Use it as a backup device for your PeeCee. (Cluster size would probably kill you, but what the heck?) My laptop's only got 15G. I could back it up to the RTV easy... Wonder if I can talk PowerQuest into adding RTV support to DriveImage...


- Use it as a household PeeCee file server. Shoot, my big 'puter ain't on all the time, but one of my RTVs is...


- Create a secret and unexpected hiding place for that oh-so-special data that paranoids always gotta keep hidden (my digital camera's currently serving this role ;) )


- If you're completely antisocial: Create a special variant of the Nimda virus that specifically targets RTV boxes, replacing your semi-archived Red Dwarf marathons with "montage" episodes of "Who's the Boss?"


- Use it as additional storage for keeping all those extra Half-Life or Quake III DM maps


- Build a kludge-box to turn it into the world's biggest digital telephone answering machine


- Screw with your family or roommates by running PGP against all their favorite recorded shows. Hold the keys for ransom.


- Watch all your TV shows through a 320x240 Windows Media Player window


Well, that's all that come to mind now. Anyone else got any suggestions?
 

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yikes, toots, you're not supposed to "keep" those images after you use them. you know, the black and green ones...
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by toots


- Create a secret and unexpected hiding place for that oh-so-special data that paranoids always gotta keep hidden (my digital camera's currently serving this role ;) )
Check out SCRAMDISK http://www.scramdisk.clara.net/


It's free (as in speech and beer). it uses hard encryption on a container file to create a virtual secure drive. They may steal my PC, but they won't get my quicken data!


For the truly paranoid, it also supports stenography in WAV files.


Robert
 

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Yeah, steganography, as in hidden writing.
 

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OK, I'll byte:cool: What IS hiding in the image you posted?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by BaysideBas
OK, I'll byte:cool: What IS hiding in the image you posted?
The image above contains steganographic data. I put it there intentionally, using a readily available, easy to detect tool that implants steganographic data into JPEGs.


Over the last couple of months, I've posted the image in public places to see if all those people crawling the web, looking for steganographic data, and later claiming there is none on the web, will ever trip over it, and if so, will they properly detect it.


I thought I was making it pretty easy to catch, but from the papers I've read from the people who insist that there's just none out there, this trivial example of mine would have been rejected as a "false positive." It ain't.


Now, as to what it says - that would be telling.
 

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Might I add, GREAT choice using a picture of a 'web crawler' to test the functionality of the web crawlers ;)


But how do you know they haven't found it? Is there a site where they share results or talk about this stuff or something?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, I don't know if they've found it, but they generally discuss what criteria an image has to meet to be successfully classified as a "hit" and one aspect of how I encoded the data indicates to me that it would not pass their criteria, and they would therefore erroneously reject it.


So, if they are indeed doing what they say they're doing, I can say with high confidence that at least the most vocal people doing this survey would:


1) Identify the image as possibly containing steganographic data

2) Identify the program used to encode that data

3) Attempt to crack the data, be unsuccessful at the crack

4) Because of the unsuccessful crack, place it into the "false positives" category.


Now, if someone like the NSA are crawling the web doing a more thorough survey, I have no doubt that they would have absolutely no problem cracking the first layer, which as I said, I intentionally made easy to spot (with appropriate analysis software) and easy to crack.


As for the second layer... well, there's just a little surprise inside, that's alls I'm sayin'. No virus or anything like that. Just a surprise.
 
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