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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My reciever has different crossovers 120, 150, 100, 80. Which one should I use. Its on 150. Usually bigger is better, but sometimes not. Also when considering speakers, since my reciever can take 5.1 and 7.1, do you acutally get a better experience when you go with 7.1 or should I just stick with 5.1?
 

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What speakers do you have? Are you using a sub?


Your crossover setting is the frequency at which the processor directs to the subwoofer. By setting at 150, you're directing frequencies below 150 to the sub. Typically 80 is a solid crossover point.


More than you ever wanted to know about crossovers:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audio_crossover
 

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I think your best bet would be to disable the sub's internal crossover if possible or turn the sub's crossover to 150 or 180 or however high it will go. Then set the receiver's crossover to 80 Hz. If your mains are large set the fronts to "large" but most large speakers don't go as low as a sub so you may even get the best results with all speakers set to "small" and allow the receiver to send all content below 80 Hz to the sub. You don't really want to set the crossover higher than 80 Hz because the sub's location will become apparent at frequencies above 80 Hz, you never want to be able to tell where the sub is by ear, it should disappear and not make it's location known. You can get good results with 5.1, many people don't have enogh room behind the listening position anyway.
 

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I would stick with 80 or 100Hz. Anything above that, and you can localize the sub. In some rooms, 100Hz can be localized. You can experiment with it and see what you like best. Turn the crossover setting on the sub up as high as it will go to avoid having a "hole" in your audio, and the crossover in the receiver will send the appropriate sound to the appropriate speaker. It's also my opinion that you should set all your speakers to "small" in the receiver, even if they're big speakers. The reason is power. It takes a lot more power to reproduce low frequency sound waves and maintain volume. That's why your sub has a more powerful amp built in (ASSuming you're using a powered sub). Unless you're running a really powerful amp, then you probably don't have enough power for your front speakers to be running at full range. So by setting all your speakers to small, you'll be taking some strain off your amp (you're probably using an AV receiver, right?) and this will also help prevent other problems, like clipping or overheating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Running on 80 sounds great. Changed speakers even my mains to small and widened my dimensions a notch. Huge improvement. My movies sounded great for dvd, but for blu ray it didn't sound like it used to. Thanks for the help.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by zach.riggs /forum/post/15590572


Running on 80 sounds great. Changed speakers even my mains to small and widened my dimensions a notch. Huge improvement. My movies sounded great for dvd, but for blu ray it didn't sound like it used to. Thanks for the help.

So....in your opinion, did it make blu-rays better or worse?
 
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