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Sure. When you crank the receiver all the way up, it starts sending dirty power (clipping) to the speakers. Such dirty power may/will damage them.


What receiver do you have, specifically?
 

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More chance of doing speaker damage with an underpowered amp than an overpowered one. 140wpc receiver would very common with 200w speaker.

BTW the receiver is rated at 140w doesn't mean it will deliver 140w all channels driven at the same time, more like less than 1/2 that.
 

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Good responses. The key is "unclipped" power. It's called clipping because if you look at the distorted waveform on a scope, the peaks are flattened and they look like they've been clipped off. But you can damage a speaker with too much power, and with too little power. And you can blow up a speaker rated at 150 watts with a 150 watt amplifier. Just put your mind to it, and it can be done...
 

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Amplifier power can be measured. Speaker power handling really can't, though. For example, if a speaker is advertised to handle 200 watts, is that continuous? Over what period? A few msec? Test tones, or program material? At what frequency? Take a 3-way speaker, and it's power handling will be lower near the lower frequencies of each driver's operating range. If a midrange crosses from the woofer at 400 Hz, it will usually handle far less power down there than at 1 kHz. And a tweeter in a "200 watt" speaker won't handle 200 watts. There's not a lot of energy up there compared to midrange and bass, and if you put 200 watts at 15 kHz into almost any tweeter, you'll fry it pretty fast.


(I didn't expect that to clear anything up, BTW...)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Scarpelli /forum/post/17051274


And a tweeter in a "200 watt" speaker won't handle 200 watts. There's not a lot of energy up there compared to midrange and bass, and if you put 200 watts at 15 kHz into almost any tweeter, you'll fry it pretty fast.

Yeah, my dumb self has tried that once. Had some Polk R10 bookshelf speakers (recommended amplifier power: 20-100 Watts, as per the specs, whatever that means), connected to an older Technics integrated amp (claimed to deliver around 70 Watts/channel @ 8 Ohm). I created a 17 kHz test tone, burned it on a CD and threw in a CD player. Cranked the amp about 1/3rd of the way... burned the tweeters within a matter of seconds.
 

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Also. Not all measured watts are the same.

Some AMPs and recievers power ratings are with only one channel running, some with all channels. Current also matters when deteriming power ratings, with high current AMPs being better
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What receiver do you have, specifically?[/quote]


I have the Pioneer Elite SC-05 and Martin Logan speakers. I always here that MartinLogan need a lot of power and if anything I should get a dedicated two channel amp for my fronts but I was just a little curious as I play around with volume levels.
 
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