AVS Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
617 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yes I know it is spelt rong!

:)

I just replaced the blade in my skill saw so I could cut plywood for the top of my stage area...it is already burning the wood when I cut, and its almost impossible to cut straight.

Question is...is it me, or is it possible that the bearing in the saw is toast so the blade might not run true?

The blade was brand new and I am miffed!

Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
It is hard to make a straight cut with a hand saw.


Try renting/borrowing/buying a table saw with an adjustable fence. It should make your life much easier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
Cutting plywood on a table saw isn’t the easiest way to go. I purchased a 97" metal straight edge from Home Depot that clamps down on each end. It came with a couple small c-clamps, but I used instead a couple Quick-Grip mini bar clamps. These work better and are quick to add and remove. This provides me with an ideal straight edge. Be sure to set the straight edge after measuring the distance from the blade to the saws cutting edge so you won’t end up cutting your wood too short or long. Also be sure to use a finishing blade for your finish cuts and not the rip blade that came with the circular saw.


Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Settopguy,


I can certainly relate to your situation. I don't know if the bearings

are shot, but I do find it's difficult to cut a straight line

with a circular [skill] saw. I used a straight-edge when cutting my

OSB. I used the "factory edge" of a scrap piece of OSB as an 8'

straight edge.


The side of the blade on my circular saw is about 1-1/8" from the edge

of the saw's table (I don't know what the flat surface on the circular saw

is actually called). I clamped the straight edge 1-1/8" from where I was

intending to cut. This worked well for me. I hope this makes sense.


Good luck on your HT progress.


Take care,

Pat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,186 Posts
I purchased a straight edge designed to clamp on plywood for sawing purposes much like Don described. It has worked perfectly for 30 years. Much better cut than a table saw, which I also have, but don't use to cut plywood. It's just too hard to keep a big sheet going through straight.


Deane
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
If it's burning the wood, it sounds like the blade may be on backwards? Could it? I t happened to me once and that's what it did.


I agree with the straight edge idea. It's takes a bit more prep time, but it cuts straight more often that when I try to run Plywood on a table saw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,301 Posts
Scott-


You did not say what type of new blade your are using. Is it a plywood blade?


Burning usually happens from one the following:


Incorrect feed speed (to slow).


Blade on backwards.


Skewing the cut (saw (or material) not being fed straight) easy to do without a 'straight' edge or fence.


Dull blade (Not the case with a new blade).


Blade running not 'true' usually doesn't burn and cuts a wider saw kerf do to blade wobble. It will also leave less than smooth cut (radial cut marks).


Answer to everyones home theater DIY projects (especially cabinets) = FESTO ( expensive but worth every penny). Note: not for cutting studs.


Regards, Bruce
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,301 Posts
Here's a sketch of a jig for straight line cuts. You can make a long one for ripping 8' ( try to make it longer (+10" each end) approx. 116") and a short one for crosscuts.


Picture is self explanatory, make the base a little wider such that after your first cut the 1/4" edge is used to line up on two marks to cut exactly where you want, from then on. The base also acts as a chip-breaker for cleaner splinter-free top cuts (where the blade normally exits the wood on the up-stroke and tears out).


Just be sure the fence board is straight (factory edges are not reliable, BTW).


Enjoy,


Bruce
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
I cut big sheets of wood with a guide clamped on the board, finished face down. I then set the saw to cut just a little deeper that the wood, and set the wood on a flat spot on the lawn (don't do this in the rain, don't use a 3-2 cheater plug). This supports both sides of the wood and prevents pinching of the blade and breaking of the wood at the end of the cut. (Some grass stains may occur on the wood and knees.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
617 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the quick replies.

I tried to cut faster and it didn't burn...good.

The blade is for plywood. It is in the right way around.

Unfortunately i don't have any long lengths to saw or i would have used a guide...I used the skill saw for the first 2' of cut then transition-ed to jig saw for the curve in the proscenium.

All done for now.

But i still hate using that saw!

:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
631 Posts
One of the best things I have found with projects like this is the opportunity to buy new tools. :p That might be why I am so over budget :confused: I use the long piece of plywood for a guide too sometimes. Most of the time if I am ripping something less then 10 inches wide I will use this link I know this is for a porter cable saw but they make and sell ones for skill. They work great. ps. I hate plywood blades. They work well for trim and that is about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
631 Posts
I would use a sawzall "Reciprocating Saw". A jigsaw would work but it would take 3 times a long, although you would probably get a somther cut. for a perfect arch you could get or make THIS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,301 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by scottatl
So what do you use to cut plywood on the curved part of the stage, a Jigsaw? Attached is my stage design.
Scottatl-


There are a couple of approaches you could use here. Since this example is 'Elliptical' then a series of bent plywood forms that match the curves but a a couple inch smaller radius. This could act as a fence for your jig saw. Or if the stage was to not be carpeted and you needed a better finish cut, then you would need to make an exact sized template (1/2" ply). You could rough cut it with a jig saw leaving about a 1/8-1/4" margin, then follow up with template and a router with a 'Pattern Following' router bit. This bit is like a flush trim router bit - except the bearing is on the opposite end (closer to the router).


Jigsaws and routers can be attached to long narrow strips of plywood to make large radius cutting jigs.


Bruce
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
457 Posts
Don't forget to check the size of your extension cord. A 50' #16 extension cord may work just fine with your drill, or jigsaw. But, it may not deliver the capacity to a 15 A skillsaw. I kept thinking that I needed a new blade in my table saw (although it seemed sharp enough) until, by chance, I plugged it into my #14 cord. No more bogging, here! I also noticed that my air compressor had troubles starting when I used an extension cord.


Just something that I've run into lately now that I've upgraded to more powerful tools:D


As far as accuracy, I've had a phenomenal performance from my new DeWalt cordless circular saw. Much easier to control than a standard circular saw (less power though).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,448 Posts
Thanks Bruce and Bwolff.


It will be carpeted, so I do not need the "smooth cut". I will be doing this cut 2 or 3 times. I know the AVSForum body of knowledge tells me to use 3 pieces of plywood with roofing felt in-between, but I will probably only use two, to cut down on the time.


Unless someone tells me to use three - I will go anyway the wind is blowing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,301 Posts
Scottatl-


Here's another thought. I assume your going to have some sort of similar profile kick panel, right? You could use that for your jig, 2 -options:


A. No overhang - just use flush trim router bit (after rough cutting with jigsaw). Repeat for each layer.


B. With over hang - either replace the rub-bearing on the flush trim bit with a larger one, Or make a 'donut' bushing that fits over the bearing, giving you the offset (overhang) you want. Then repeat for each layer. This would probably be a problem for large overhangs. But you get the Idea.


Bruce
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
647 Posts
For the stage... curved surface you an use luan plywood around the front. It bends easy around curves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,448 Posts
I am not sure what luan plywood is, I was going to use molding for the curve. It also bends easly an I can run it all the way around the front, should produce a nice look.


I do have a router, but have not played with it much, might have to give it a try Bruce.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,301 Posts
Luan is a low grade of Phillipine mahogany typically used on interior hollow core door skins. Actually, most any 1/4" or less plywood would probably work, although 1/8 - 1/4" hardboard (cheapest) would provide a smoother surface especially if someone needed a paint grade surface.


jhill32-


I'm always amused by contractors that help keep HD / Lowes etc. in business by having to buy power tools on a way to frequent basis (they shorten the life dramatically), due to exactly your point. It's quite often at job sites to see a couple 100' extension cords linked together and run out to a power pole.


Here's an example of voltage drop:


Max Wire feet @ 120 volt - 1 phase 2% max Voltage drop


10 amp #14 - 45' #12 - 70'

15 amp #14 - 30' #12 - 47'


Scott- lots of uses for that tool. Hand held use - the feed direction should be counter-clockwise (ex. routing the outside of a table top).


Good Luck on your stage - I like that shape.


Bruce
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top