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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, I've read everything on the internet and need some sound advice. I just recently moved into my home and it has a dedicated home theater. I've upgrade all the electronics and kept the atlantic technolgy speakers (7.1)...


So here's the kicker, the sub is in a hollow cavity in the wall, about 2/3 of the way toward the back of the room, almost right next to the listening area...


Whenever I watch action movies or listen to music, the base rattles the wall and virbates like hell. I don't want to move the sub because it's in a great location, but is there anything I can do to dampen the vibration?


I was thinking adding carpet underneath the sub, putting thick rubber around the cavity to dampen the vibration.


Any suggestions is also greatly appreciated.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by zebby  /t/1524319/sub-vibrating-walls#post_24529963


Whenever I watch action movies or listen to music, the base rattles the wall and virbates like hell. I don't want to move the sub because it's in a great location, but is there anything I can do to dampen the vibration?
You need to track down what's actually vibrating. One way to find out is to pull the sub out of the cavity and see if that helps. I suspect it's something to do with the cavity, not the wall.
 

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Sub will vibrate walls and anything else if the spl is high enough at the structure resonance frequency. Think of an Earthquake and it's sonic capabilities. Relocate the sub outside the wall or turn it down. Carpet and rubber feet will not help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That's what I thought about relocating it to the front of the room. However, if I somehow enclose the cavity and line it with thick rubber, would that help?


Just asking, because if I relocate it to the front of the room, have to patch the wall.
 

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Stick a plant in the hole.
 

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Quote:
That's what I thought about relocating it to the front of the room.
The sub should go where it works best, as determined by doing the sub crawl, not where it's most convenient or looks best.
Quote:
However, if I somehow enclose the cavity and line it with thick rubber, would that help?
There's only one way to find out.
 

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Your wall is vibrating from the sound produced by the sub, not from the enclosure moving. When I moved to our new house I had to practically de-vibe the living room. My fiancé put all the pictures up with Velcro command strips so there's no contact with the wall and I actually had to remove the vinyl grids from the window that make it look like it has panes cause at certain low frequencies they vibrated something awful. I still can't quite figure out how to get my baseboard heat to quit vibrating. I'd move your sub. You have a dedicated room, might as well make it sound it's best.
 

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If it is truly "the wall" that is vibrating then options are possibly to sink some additional drywall screws along the stud lines, fill the wall voids with spray foam insulation or even go so far as to double-up the drywall on the offending wall (possibly with some acoustic damping compound between the layers for good measure). If it is actually the wall structure (studs, header/footer) then you will have to add some combination of fasteners, bracing and additional mass.


When I moved into my home I made some strategic cuts in the main dividing wall between the master bedroom and the living room viewing area. While I did patch the drywall (bedroom side) I made a decision to just double-layer the existing drywall with the addition of a 5/8" X-rate layer bonded with 2" drywall screws and two tubes of acoustic damping compound per sheet. This gave me a fresh, flat surface for the bedroom wall (much better than 30 years of random picture hanging and dents in the original) and added significant mass between the sleeping area and the movie watching room.


I suspect that the vibrating walls may actually be loose wires or even unbraced pipes or drain vents in the walls. Options here are to open the wall and secure the offending elements or possibly fill with expanding spray foam.


If you apply pressure to the wall (lean on it) while it is vibrating does it stop?
 
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