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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm building a HT in my basement (apx. 18x18x9ft). It was all figured out with an equipment room in back, cables running through the floor, the ceiling, the walls, etc., including a subwoofer built-in under the screen. My architect, however, heard from a high-end HT consultant that the subwoofer should always be in the back of the room. Is this true? I know that bass frequencies are supposedly non-directional, but I find that if the sub isn't at least in the same general area as the higher-frequency satellites, it sounds out of whack ...


Any advice on HT subwoofer location would be welcome ...


Thanks.


PS -- While I'm asking, does anyone have any advice on how far I can run a DVI cable without using a repeater? I'm planning on a 25' run from my computer to my Plus Piano DLP projector.
 

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"My architect, however, heard from a high-end HT consultant that the subwoofer should always be in the back of the room. Is this true? "


No, its not true.


I've had the best luck placing subs on the same plane as the the main speakers. Many people advocate corner placement, which increases level but excites more room modes.


Bottom line, give yourself some flexibility in sub placement. Cable is cheap to add now, a pain later.


Regards,


Tom


P.S. Tell the architect to ditch the HT consultant.
 

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Never heard that one before. Some will say that bass is non-directional so it doesn't matter.


Why not play both ways and put one in front and one in back! :D
 

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Don't ever trust what someone "heard" from someone else. Too much gets lost in the translation. Do your own research and experimentation and go with what works best for you, not for somebody else.
 

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there are no absolutes in acoustics and anyone who tells you that is uninformed at best.


alot of people like one in the front wall and one along the side wall which is what I am doing. Experimentation is key, but doesnt help when you have to run the cables before hand....catch 22
 

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Russ Herschelmann, Audio Video Interiors' Home Theater Guy and Stereophile's Home Theater Architect, recommends rear placement of the sub when possible. Don't recall why.
 

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Let's see. Russ says the back. Floyd Toole does the front. THX/Dolby show subs in the front. Nousaine has done front and front+side. Holman does front (generally). Seems that if you find the right name to drop, you can justify putting your sub almost anywhere in the room. Imagine that! :)


By and large, sub-woofer frequencies are non-directional so placing them where they better couple with the room (which may be anywhere) is the plan.
 

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I guess I should have done a pull quote


With regard to rear placement of the sub, bpape posted

Quote:
Never heard that one before.
I was citing Russ as a published proponent of the rear placement approach that bpape may be familar with. It was not my intention to give the impression that it was the correct approach because of who said it.
 

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ralphie,


Possibly if the sub was running the LFE channel only. Like a bass shaker,,, maybe ?? never tried it though.


If the sub is also handling lower frequencies for any other satellite speaker the phase thing would be maddening!


If your sub is a little under sized for the room like mine is. In a corner equal distance from both walls with nothing in front. Down side you can sometimes perceive what side of the room the sound is coming
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks, all. The sub is acting as a lower-frequency driver for the satellites (even the center/front speakers need it), so I think I'm going to go with the front. (Maybe that means it's not a true sub? -- dunno.) We'll wire it both ways, though, and move it to the back if it sounds better (or better yet, as someone suggested, maybe we'll get a second one to bring up the rear!).


ralphie
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by ralphie
... I know that bass frequencies are supposedly non-directional, but I find that if the sub isn't at least in the same general area as the higher-frequency satellites, it sounds out of whack ...
Hi all:


Many threads concerning "Bass" such as this one always seem to gravitate to discussions of the lower, non-directional frequencies. However, isn't it true that most of the bass content in movie tracks are in the frequency ranges in which we can localize the direction of the sound? And isn't also true that most of the sound follows the action which is in the front?


Then if this is true wouldn't ralphie's observation be correct about it soundng "out of whack" since a lot of higher frequency, directional bass intended for the front would be coming from the rear?


Thanks.


Larry
 

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Not trying to 'zing' you either. Just saying I hadn't heard of rear placement ALONE. I agree that there would have to be some phase issues.


I was also serious about having two subs. Best bass I ever heard (accuracy, coherence, strength, etc.) was a room with 4, yes 4 Vandersteen subs placed around the room. Phase and node issues seemed to 'cancel' each other out. While not necessarily a cost effective solution for everyone, the result was VERY impressive.


If it was me and I had only 1 sub, I would work it into the front of the room somewhere. But, that is just my opinion.
 

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I've tried it both ways. I prefer the front. The reason is that the bass sound level seems more even from all of the listening positions. With the subwoofer near the rear, it will normally be very close to one listening position which causes a noticable increase in loudness there. That's my experience anyway.
 

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Quote:
(apx. 18x18x9ft)
Hmmm, we need to talk more about those demensions then where your sub is placed, because in that room it may not matter where the sub is. The first no..no, is a square room, the second no...no is the hieght being half of the walls length. I gots me a headache just thinking about it. Course it could be worse, like a 18x18x18 room.
 

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I think the distance from the speaker to the listeners' ears is also important. It is easier to have the front, center, and subwoofer the same distance if they are all in the front.


It sounds like more peple prefer the subwoofer in front.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Uh oh. Now I'm nervous about my room dimensions. Let me guess: square is bad and a ceiling height 1/2 the width/depth will cause phase issues? Luckily, my room size estmate was a little off. The room is 19' (deep) x 17' (wide) x 8-9' tall (we haven't settled on the final height yet -- it's a basement floor that we're lowering to make it livable). There are a number of things to break up standing waves and the like (a staircase, a stepped wall, etc. -- plus whatever wall coverings we want to add). So I think (hope) we'll be OK, but there's still time to move things around, so please let me know if I should know something critical about this.


In fact, I've attached a sketch of the room. I'd love to hear any comments you may have. It's very preliminary, but I think you'll get the idea. The big changes are the depth of the screen cabinetry is only about half of what's here (about 12" -- this shows more like 24), and the storage space sliding door is different (but has no effect on the shape of the room).


Regards,


Ralphie
 

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LarryChanin, from what I have read, and experimented with, you can start to localize the bass when it starts to go higher than about 120hz. So, if you have the right type of crossover and set it correctly, you will not be able to localize it. Remember that if you have a crossover that specs out a 6db/octave drop, and you set it to 60hz, at 120hz it will be 6db lower volume than at 60hz (not counting the driver's abilities). So if you set it to 40hz, at 80hz it will be 6db down.....


Ralphie, make sure you are ready for multiple positions by getting the RG-6 or RG-59 coax run to all locations where you might want to put a sub. Then later, when you at testing, you can try every location in the room with a long cable, then poke out the one you need.
 

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Quote:
The room is 19' (deep) x 17' (wide) x 8-9' tall
Ok thats a bit better then 18x18x9. Spread out a little more would be better yet, but in this case I think you should be just fine IMHO. I mean you gots to take what is given to you sometimes. Good luck on the project!


And for whats it worth sub in the front! Again IMHO.
 
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