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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,


Have a small cottage that I'd like to put a subwoofer into. The main floor is 400 sq ft total. That includes an open concept kitchen/family room, a small bathroom, and the stair landing going upstairs. So figure main room is approx 325-350sq ft total.


The main room has a TV on the wall and I have four of the Monoprice 6.5" dual voice coil speakers in the ceiling for home theater. About to install a center channel one too.


The biggest problem is not enough bass! Room is used for three things:

1. Watching TV/movies (love the bass rumbles if I can get them!)

2. Light dinner/evening music... which then turns into #3 below....

3. Dancing. Dance music, rap, R&B, that kind of stuff. Basically I need good bass thuds for my tunes



Two options. Both suck but I'm trying to figure out which one sucks least
Budget is relatively small....


OPTION 1:

In the cabinet above the fridge. The house has 9ft ceiling so sub will be at least 7ft above the ground in an unused cabinet. AC receptacle already there, so I'm thinking of the Monoprice wireless powered sub as a plug-and-play solution:


Monoprice PID 10544
http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=109&cp_id=10906&cs_id=1090602&p_id=10544&seq=1&format=2&utm_expid=58369800-11.R-enhtUGRrSdHz5vzpVS2g.0&utm_referrer=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.monoprice.com%2FSearch%2FIndex%3Fkeyword%3Dsubwoofer


The cabinets are rock solid and I'm good at finding/fixing rattles so I think I could do a good job here. Cabinet doors would remain closed at all times. They have rubber bumpers on them already.


PROS: Easy. Plug, connect wireless, done.

CONS: What the heck is gonna happen with a subwoofer behind two closed doors? Will the doors rattle all night long?

COST: $220 or so



OPTION 2:

Use an 'in-wall' subwoofer and add an external mono amp. I could locate this pretty close to where the stereo receiver is, and I'm good at cutting holes, pulling wire, etc. But like I said, it would be a very easy wire run and I could be up and running in an hour or two.

http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id=109&cp_id=10837&cs_id=1083705&p_id=4928&seq=1&format=2&utm_expid=58369800-11.R-enhtUGRrSdHz5vzpVS2g.0&utm_referrer=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.monoprice.com%2FSearch%2FIndex%3Fkeyword%3Dsubwoofer


PROS: Totally clean looking. I have painted Monoprice speaker covers before and they disappear into the walls which is awesome. I also have some spots where you really can't see the drywall unless you're standing in a weird corner location or something. So 90% of the people wouldn't even be looking at the speaker in the first place.


CONS: Will this put out as much bass as Option 1? Two reasons why I think it may not (but correct me if I'm wrong)

A) Monoprice describes this as a solution to fill in between midrange speakers and a powered sub. They specifically say this isn't intended to be a sub, more to be a "filler" in between speakers and a sub.

B) I would end up with a 160watt+10" sub solution, compared to Option 1 which would be 110w+8". But Option 1 is a ported, tuned box where this would be a hole in the wall packed with insulation. I suspect Option 1 might actually throw more and better base because it's designed to work out of the box and engineered perfectly.


COST: Audiosource 100 amp on Amazon is $75 for an Amazon Warehouse Deal (open box) unit. And $40 for the sub makes it $115 total cost.. Which is $100 cheaper than Option 1.


Not too concerned with the cost savings. But HELP! what's the better option of the two? ?!?!?!?!


Thanks!
 

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Option 1 is not a good idea, unless you wish to listen to dishes rattling to the beat! I assume you do not have any floor space to just put a stand alone sub somewhere? That would be the best solution. If not, I guess an in-wall is your best solution.


I have used an audiosource amp to power a passive sub and it worked very well ... just be sure it has adequate ventilation.


As to the sub itself, you may wish to experiment with placement BEFORE cutting holes in your wall. Find a spot with the most even response at your seating position and also around the room.. Last, but not least, be sure you use in-wall rated speaker wire!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks RayGuy


The cabinet is separate from the rest and it's above a wall oven. The cabinet has nothing in it and never will... it's too high up to be usable really, so we just installed it more for cosmetic reasons (so things would look 'uniform'.)


But I agree that it's going to rattle everything in the kitchen so I think I'll drop Option 1. Thanks for your insite.


I do have some floor space but there is nowhere to put it where it won't be ugly and/or constantly tripped over. So it comes down to no sub or an inwall sub as my two options



I am looking at putting the Audisource AMP100 in my media room (in bridged mode) and using the Monoprice 10" wall subwoofer. I think that might be my best solution.


Any thoughts as to Monoprice saying this is a fill in unit (between your sub and midranges) rather than being an actual subwoofer??


Some people in the reviews seem to think it pounds pretty good as long as you stuff the wall cavity with insulation.


I have spray foamed insulation, so I'd cut the hole, cram the wall cavity (above and below and possibly behind the sub) with fiberglas insulation, and hope for the best. I could get the wall pretty packed up with insulation so it should work out well.


Still have a spool of in-wall rated wire from my ceiling speaker install so I should be good there.


There is no real "seating area" as there is a breakfast bar, couch, etc. Music gets listened to from almost every location in the room .. so one location won't get used more than another.


But I see what you're saying about sub placement... I'll run a long wire and "test" it out in a few different spots to see what's best. One wall is all glass/metal doors so I wonder if the sub will sound different based on where it's placed. I'll try a few locations first.


Thanks!!
 

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It will definitely sound different, depending on it's location. Most folks here are tuning for one seating area, so placement is all important to get the most bump out of their sub. It's actually MORE difficult to get good bass "everywhere". Depending on the room, it may never be possible get that to happen. I haven't tried it, but many folks here are suggesting not one, but two subs to get a more even response across the room. Perhaps you might consider that, if finances allow.



As to the Monoprice, I am not familiar with that particular sub, but my impression from what you have said is that it probably won't go very low. But that is really not all that important, unless you're a bass-head. What IS important, is how it will blend with the speakers you already have. What kind of frequency response do those speakers have? You want to be able to have a seamless transition between the two. That depends on the frequency response of the units(there should be some overlap), the frequency used to crossover, and your ability to listen and adjust it until it sounds seamless.


If you haven't already, I would ask Monoprice what sub they recommend to pair with the speakers.
 

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The external sub will be better, without a doubt, at least from the perspective of performance, if not aesthetics. That being said, I doubt it will be a very good sub, so temper your expectations. One more thing, I know you don't want to spend a lot, but a sound system based on monoprice in-ceiling speakers makes me want to cry, no offense. Given that you are not going to have great sound anyway, whichever sub you get may not be a big deal, in which case you might just save some money and get the cheapest one.
 
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