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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Though I have my sub Eqed, I find myself setting the subwoofer level several dBs above the other channels. For example of FL, CC, FR, SR, SBR, SL and SBL are set at 85dB, I like my sub set around 90dB. I am curious to know at what level you guys have your sub set to ? Do you have a different setting for Music and Movies ?

Thanks,

-Jai
 

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Heya Jai. I run it flat with the other speakers for music. For movies, I tend to bump it a few dBs depening on what I'm watching. Too far and it gets annoying quick.


Sean
 

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My subs are pretty flat down to 35 at a similar level to my LCRs...... but with EQ, I have the 20-35 hz area juiced 4 db. Makes the impact more 'fun'.


With EQ, you can raise whatever frequency you like, I find raising the lower frequencies creats less problems for others.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hey Sean,

Good to see you hear. BTW, any news about the Onix ref sub ? I have changed subs twice waiting for it. Infinity HPS-1000 to SVS16-46PC+ to

now the Velodyne HGS-18 series II. The HGS is simply incredible !! I love it.

BTW, what happened to the UFW-10 ?


Coming to the topic of this thread... for music the 750s do an awesome job. Honestly, I don't seem to need a sub for 2-Ch music. The bass seems to have gotten better with time. I am working on an external crossover which will help me use the sub with Lexicons pure bypass mode (acting as a DAC with volume control). By how many dB do you bump up your sub ?

You have an SVS right (CS Ultra ?).

-Jai
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Jeff,

I think you deserve that title "King of Bass". I have enjoyed reading your posts on subwoofers and about the Contrabass. I remember you mentioning in one of your threads about setting the sub level 10dB higher. Did I misread or was it for testing ? My in-room response has a natural 5dB gain, actually a couple of peaks in the lowest octave. I tamed them. Maybe I will try increasing the small dip in this area to get an effective 5 dB juice in this area. I still have a nasty dip at 75-80Hz which I cannot tame and also requires a lot of gain at that frequency. I would rather leave it the way it is. In a secondary seating position near the primary position, the dip moves to 55Hz and the 75-80Hz is actually smooth. So it is the room that is causing this. I will experiment and report back.

-Jai
 

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You also have to remember that Jeff's sub's have also rattled a few screws loose too. So look out!!




;)
 

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There are two adjustments to consider. First, in order to match the DTS LFE with the DD LFE, on a lot of receivers you need to bump up the DTS LFE to +10 db. That will make the bass output for both soundtracks equal. I don't know why this is, it just is! It should be fairly easy to verify whether you need to make this adjustment with a SPL meter and test DVD.


The other adjustment that I've seen suggested on other boards is to bump up the subwoofer level by 4 db basically to compensate for human hearing in the lower frequency ranges. Apparently, we don't naturally hear bass as well as other frequencies.
 

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I bump my sub up a notch for DVD's, but only about 3-4 decibels. For music, I bump it down around 3-4 decibels. No science or logic here, just the way I enjoy listening.
 

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Wood,


We don't hear 'low bass' as well as other frequencies (e.g. under 40 hz). Boosting the lower, problematic frequencies will assure a more even sound rather than boosting all frequencies below 80z. This can create other problems like too much midbass, chestiness.


DTS and DD LFEs are generally set similarly. DTS CDs are recorded 10 db lower in bass and do need adjusting. DTS movies do not. Your equipment may be not properly set or old. 10 db adjustments aren't required anywhere these days for DD vs DTS soundtracks..
 

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>>>BTW, any news about the Onix ref sub ?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by thebland
Boosting the lower, problematic frequencies will assure a more even sound rather than boosting all frequencies below 80z. This can create other problems like too much midbass, chestiness.
Good point on only boosting the bass in the lower 40 Hz range. I guess that's yet another use for a parametric EQ!

Quote:
Originally posted by thebland


DTS and DD LFEs are generally set similarly. DTS CDs are recorded 10 db lower in bass and do need adjusting. DTS movies do not. Your equipment may be not properly set or old. 10 db adjustments aren't required anywhere these days for DD vs DTS soundtracks..
I think for most current equipment, this is true, but this issue was more the norm as recently as two years ago, so there are still quite a few receivers/processors in use that need this adjustment. (I know this was the case with Yamaha and Denon receivers, among others, from two years ago; and I don't necessarily think that something from two years ago is old!) Like I said, it's easy enough to verify with a SPL meter and test DVD. If the subwoofer output differs significantly between the DD and DTS tracks, then the +10 db adjustment to the DTS LFE on your receiver/processor is needed. If the SPL meter detects no differences, then no adjustments needed. I originally detected the discrepency just in comparing DD and DTS soundtracks by ear, and initially made an 8 db LFE adjustment before I even bought my SPL meter and test disc or found out about the issue on audio boards. So, it's not really difficult to identify the issue if it's there.
 

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I am not sure of the newer DTS soundtracks require this. For example, my DTS copies of Saving Private Ryan, Casper, and Jurassic park (all LDs) had bass that was at least 5-6 db over DD LDs. Most DTS DVDs seem to be a little hotter than the DD counter aprts ..but not by much. LOTR though is a newer example that has a very hot DTS track.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by thebland
I am not sure of the newer DTS soundtracks require this. For example, my DTS copies of Saving Private Ryan, Casper, and Jurassic park (all LDs) had bass that was at least 5-6 db over DD LDs. Most DTS DVDs seem to be a little hotter than the DD counter aprts ..but not by much. LOTR though is a newer example that has a very hot DTS track.
My understanding of the issue is that it didn't have anything to do with the discs themselves, but with how a lot of processors were designed. On my Yamaha for example, the LFE adjustment for DD is -10 db to 0, whereas the LFE adjustment available for DTS is -10 db to +10 db, and in order to match the DD and DTS LFE outputs, I have to include a 10 db differential between the DD and DTS LFE levels. I don't think it's much of an issue anymore, but two years ago it cropped up frequently.
 
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