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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Please bare with me as im kinda new to all this.

My subwoofer is currently connected to my Onkyo receiver via an RCA cable that goes from the "Line Ins" on the back of the woofer to a Y splitter and then into my receiver in the single sub-woofer out hole. (I think its an RCA; it just has red and white plugs)


Is this the best way to connect it?


Do i need to be plugged into botht eh L and R in the line in on the back of the woofer? It sounds like it works directly into the R alone.


I need to move the woofer and now need a 25ft cable and trying to figure out what my options are.


Thanks!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kwitel /forum/post/19633248


Please bare with me as im kinda new to all this.

My subwoofer is currently connected to my Onkyo receiver via an RCA cable that goes from the "Line Ins" on the back of the woofer to a Y splitter and then into my receiver in the single sub-woofer out hole. (I think its an RCA; it just has red and white plugs)


Is this the best way to connect it?


Do i need to be plugged into botht eh L and R in the line in on the back of the woofer? It sounds like it works directly into the R alone.


I need to move the woofer and now need a 25ft cable and trying to figure out what my options are.


Thanks!

That is probably fine if your sub does not have an input marked LFE. If you have that one, use it instead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kal Rubinson /forum/post/19633251


That is probably fine if your sub does not have an input marked LFE. If you have that one, use it instead.

All it has bor cable input is the Line in for L and R (which I dont understand...how is there R and L for a subwoofer?)


As for wires, it has clip inputs for Left and Right too.


The wire I am currently using that is just Red and White; what is it called and, do i need to continue using this splitter?
 

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There is either a passive or active summing circuit inside that mixes L&R as there is sub Woofer audio information in both channels.


If you receiver only has a single sub out, that summing is already accomplished in the receiver and does not need to be duplicated at the sub. You can use either the left or the right sub input as there will be no difference in audio output.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gizmologist /forum/post/19633284


There is either a passive or active summing circuit inside that mixes L&R as there is sub Woofer audio information in both channels.


If you receiver only has a single sub out, that summing is already accomplished in the receiver and does not need to be duplicated at the sub. You can use either the left or the right sub input as there will be no difference in audio output.

Thank you sir-that was the info i was looking for.


This single cable that i would use for the sub-what is it called?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gizmologist
There is either a passive or active summing circuit inside that mixes L&R as there is sub Woofer audio information in both channels.


If you receiver only has a single sub out, that summing is already accomplished in the receiver and does not need to be duplicated at the sub. You can use either the left or the right sub input as there will be no difference in audio output.
Yes, probably no difference between left or right input and that works fine in most cases as you say.


But, if changing from left or right to both, or vice versa, there could be a significant level change. The level of my Definitive Tech PF1500 changes by roughly 5dB using left or right vs both via a "Y" cable. So, if the system is dialed in with single feed then changed "Y" feed or vice versa, the sub cal level should be re-checked.


Also, if there is a problem with auto on function not turning on the sub at lower volumes, sometimes using the "Y" feed to both inputs helps with that.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gizmologist /forum/post/19633284


There is either a passive or active summing circuit inside that mixes L&R as there is sub Woofer audio information in both channels.


If you receiver only has a single sub out, that summing is already accomplished in the receiver and does not need to be duplicated at the sub. You can use either the left or the right sub input as there will be no difference in audio output.

True, in general. However, some subwoofers (depending on their level settings and input signal levels) will switch their auto-on circuits more efficiently when both L/R inputs are fed, albeit with the same signal. There is no downside and this will not change the sound, of course, but it may preclude the complaints from some users that "I have to turn up the volume before my sub turns on."
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kal Rubinson /forum/post/19635116


True, in general. However, some subwoofers (depending on their level settings and input signal levels) will switch their auto-on circuits more efficiently when both L/R inputs are fed, albeit with the same signal. There is no downside and this will not change the sound, of course, but it may preclude the complaints from some users that "I have to turn up the volume before my sub turns on."

Hmm, this is interesting. I noticed that the auto-on for my sub would take a while to cut on, when I was running only one cable to either the L or R input on the sub.


I eventually just figured that the L & R are there for a reason, and decided to run a "Y" cable from the sub cable, splitting the signal in two, and plugging them both into the L & R inputs of the sub.


The sub cuts on almost immediately of receiving a signal now.


I'm no expert or anything, but I defintely say that it couldn't hurt to plug your LFE signal to both L & R inputs on your sub.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by SAMURAI36 /forum/post/19635312


Hmm, this is interesting. I noticed that the auto-on for my sub would take a while to cut on, when I was running only one cable to either the L or R input on the sub.


I eventually just figured that the L & R are there for a reason, and decided to run a "Y" cable from the sub cable, splitting the signal in two, and plugging them both into the L & R inputs of the sub.


The sub cuts on almost immediately of receiving a signal now.


I'm no expert or anything, but I defintely say that it couldn't hurt to plug your LFE signal to both L & R inputs on your sub.

I agree; might as well err on the side of caution and just use both and plug into the splitter.


The cable that I am using, that is one red and one white...what is this cable called?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kwitel /forum/post/19636602


The cable that I am using, that is one red and one white...what is this cable called?

"Two channel analog audio," or "analog audio" for short.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulpa
"Two channel analog audio," or "analog audio" for short.
Is it a coaxial cable?

Or is it an RCA cable?


I dont know why, but I cant find what im looking for on Monoprice.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kwitel
Is it a coaxial cable?


I dont know why, but I cant find what im looking for on Monoprice.
Single RCA cable...


eg...
Monoprice - 12ft High-quality Coaxial Audio/Video RCA CL2 Rated Cable - RG6/U 75ohm (for S/PDIF, Digital Coax, Subwoofer, and Composite Video)
http://www.monoprice.com/products/pr...seq=1&format=2
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kwitel
Is it a coaxial cable?

Or is it an RCA cable?
RCA is the type of plug on the end of the cable. Coaxial is the type of wire inside. It can be both.


Monoprice markets their digital coaxial, composite video, and subwoofer cable as the same cable. Those cables are 75ohm, which isn't necessary for subwoofers, but is for digital audio and video.


This is the sub, et al, cable.

http://www.monoprice.com/products/su...02&cp_id=10236




This is an analog audio cable pair, although they don't explicitly say it is:

http://www.monoprice.com/products/pr...seq=1&format=2



I don't know if the analog audio cables they make are 75ohm, but it wouldn't surprise me if it were.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kwitel
Is it a coaxial cable?
Cannot tell without cutting it open.

Quote:
Or is it an RCA cable?
If it has RCA connectors on it, it is an RCA cable.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kal Rubinson
If it has RCA connectors on it, it is an RCA cable.
Except for a "digital coax" cable which happens to use RCA connectors.


25 years ago, "RCA cable" would best describe interconnects when it applied to audio and/or "yellow" RCA for video. BUt now with S/PDIF and component video, you really can't just say they are RCA cables. "RCA" is just the connector type.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman
Except for a "digital coax" cable which happens to use RCA connectors.
Still an RCA cable which, btw, would also work fine for analog.

Quote:
25 years ago, "RCA cable" would best describe interconnects when it applied to audio and/or "yellow" RCA for video. BUt now with S/PDIF and component video, you really can't just say they are RCA cables. "RCA" is just the connector type.
Agreed but any of these will work for analog.


It would be great if everyone was precise and correct but sloppy verbiage is endemic.
 

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 Hsu Research (who manufacture very nice subs) says:


"Which should I use with my subwoofer, a mono or stereo cable?

The vast majority of people should use a mono cable (connect it to the SUBWOOFER or LFE output on your receiver). Use stereo cables only with 2-channel stereo preamps."
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kal Rubinson /forum/post/19636960


If it has RCA connectors on it, it is an RCA cable.

It's a CINCH to say "If it has RCA connectors on it, it is an RCA cable."
 
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