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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I've had a 2 channel receiver forever and in the midst of planning a rewire to separate my stereo from TV - I've come to the conclusion that I need to move from a receiver to separates , and I'm interested in setting up a HT audio system. I'd like to start slowly, miserly, but good quality. Yep, same old story, but I'm happy to start with a pre-pro that's used and a couple of generations behind.


As I said, I’m coming from a 1992 2 channel system, so a ’98 or newer pre-pro is going to be a big step forward. I was thinking of something along the lines of a Rotel RSP-980 or RSP-985. This unit would mainly be used for watching DVD’s. Here’s what I would be looking for…


Sub $500.00 used

Minimum 5.1 system

Component input

THX

DTS


Bonus:

Up-sampling video from, say, composite to S-video or better.


A separate amp would come later, but I can use my receiver in the meantime. However, are there any suggested amps for the 985 that anyone finds is a great pair?


At first, I was looking at an Onkyo 600 series receiver, but I thought I’d get a better setup by getting used.


This along with the normal array of inputs and outputs. Am I missing out on any critical pieces, or would this type of pre-pro satisfy a casual listener? I am not a tweak happy geek, but I’m willing to learn. Any suggestions would be helpful on these two units, or any other suggestions.


Thanks,


Marshall
 

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I don't think the rsp-980 does dts or dd/ac3, and I think only the 985 is THX certified, but even used prices put it over $500.


If you already have a 2-channel music setup, and this will only be used for movies, then it really depends on how far you plan on upgrading, and you may find that a receiver is enough all on it's own.


I don't think the 600 onkyo has pre-outs, but the 700 does, so if you want to leave the option open for adding amps later, this would be a better choice
 

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Hi,


Just one comment, try not to make THX certifications to be the breaking point. There are a lot of good gear out there that are not THX certified.


Good luck.
 

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When I was shopping for separates 2 years ago, I looked at the Rotel offerings then. I was able to audition the RSP-972 and I was sorely disappointed by the sound quality. I'm not sure how much better the 985 would be, but the 972 just didn't do it for me despite the low price. In fact it was just about the only prepro in its price range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've changed my direction a bit, and may just try and get a receiver for now with pre outs so I could add an amp later.


I think this one would be pretty similar, the Rotel rsx-965. It's 5 x75 which is plenty loud and 5 outs is enough for me.


I've also discovered i don't really need the component switching as that can usually be performed by the TV.


Here's the back panel of it: http://rotel.com/support/pdfs/drawings/RSX965-back.pdf


That's disapointing to hear that (Goi) found the sound lacking. Maybe it was a bad setup?


Here's a description:


Rotel RSX965 – Description

Combining a tuner preamp and amplifiers in a single unit might be anathema to the audiophile who generally relishes the separate purchase and installation of those three components. But Rotel has put our high-ender in a bit of a bind. Especially when he looks over the list of 'phile-friendly features in this receiver. This machine offers up 75 high-current watts from each of five separate amps all rated at 8 ohms (20 Hz-20 kHz with .05% THD). It employs what Rotel calls chimney-style heat sinks that are said improve long-term reliability by increasing airflow and lowering internal temperatures. A full complement of five pre outs awaits installation of even stronger external amplifiers. To decode five channels worth of audio, Rotel installed a crystal semiconductor IC for Dolby Digital, and a Motorola digital engine for DTS processing. These brains analyze the incoming signal and automatically choose the appropriate decoder or default to Dolby Pro-Logic if the source is more conventional. An array of listening modes from basic 2-channel stereo to Stadium and Hall in DTS enables enhancement of any source. Another nice touch is automatic bass balance, which manages the bass signal to bypass the subwoofer when necessary, thereby sparing your downstairs neighbor's chandelier when you switch from Chopin to Die Hard. The back is a golden forest of input/output ports: tuner, CD, Tape 1 and 2 (both with recording output), moving-magnet phono plus five composite or S-video ins, monitor in, and four digital jacks (two each coax and TOSlink optical). All can be custom-named to help avoid confusion. Five-way binding posts accommodate numerous speaker cables. Mercifully, the front panel is missing nary a button compared to the remote, which is capable of controlling a variety of Rotel components, and even memorizing keystroke sequences in single-button macros. Its backlit and ergonomically shaped buttons should make armchair operation even more painless.


******************


So, it has Dolby Digital and DTS decoding...

No THX certification, but that isn't really as much as a feature as it is conforming to Lucaspecs? Is this piece ancient or still fairly current?


Thanks,


Marshall


Oh, I think they can be had used for around 350-$400
 
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