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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I will be building a new screen for my living room set up but I need some guidance as far as choosing a good paint to go with. First some background info: This is a 20' x 13' living room with semi-decent light control but is often used with a lamp on in the back of the room while entertaining guests or eating . The walls are a medium/dark green but the ceiling is a light grey. My current screen is a 68" parkland plastics unpainted. The new screen will be 80"-90" thrifty white board painted per recommendations. I will be spraying the screen with a Wagner HVLP conversion gun. I am not afraid to try silver fire or a mudd mix but I am not sure which variation to go with.


As stated in the title the projector is a Samsung sph710ae.


Projector throw distance is around 10' with seating at 16'.


Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks,
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
So reading some more I believe silver fire will be my best bet for my ambient light application. My projector is far from a light cannon so SF 4.0 is out of the question. Right now I'll probably go with 2.0 or 3.0. Light fusion looks cool but probably a bit too much investment for my first time shooting paint.


I'll try to pick up the paint and measuring utensils on the way home from work today.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was able to get all the ingredients last night. Tonight I won't have time to work on it but hopefully Friday I will be mixing and spraying. Still trying to decide between 2.0 and 3.0.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Oops. I got UPW 1050 instead of 1850. I have the right one now. However, in order to increase my screen size from 68" to 80"-90" I need to lower the fireplace mantle. This involves removing the fireplace mantle, chiseling out two layers of brick, and building a new lower-profile mantle. We decided to get the fireplace ready for the new screen before constructing the screen. This way we don't have to store the screen somewhere while I work of the fireplace.


Since I have all of the paint I may go ahead and mix up the silver fire formula but I won't be spraying anything until the mantle is lowered and ready for the new screen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I decided to test the screen size in my living room and to practice spraying before going with the final silver fire screen. Over the weekend I got some Behr NG8.0 based on 1850 and mixed it with poly 3:1. Spraying on TWB went reasonably well beginning with a duster coat followed by 3-4 full coats. However, I was not able to get perfectly consistent results from each horizontal pass leaving me with some horizontal streaks that are visible under solid screen projections. I don't see the streaks under normal light with the projector off or during the course of 1.5 hours of TV shows but with the projector shining a solid color on the screen they are easily visible.


I am thinking of lightly sanding down the screen with 200 grit sand paper and trying to shoot a couple more coats. I am sure my technique needs some improvement. I probably need more overlap with each horizontal pass. With a 48" height, 10" spray pattern, and 50% overlap that should leave me with about 10 passes total.
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robfive /forum/post/18435045


I decided to test the screen size in my living room and to practice spraying before going with the final silver fire screen. Over the weekend I got some Behr NG8.0 based on 1850 and mixed it with poly 3:1. Spraying on TWB went reasonably well beginning with a duster coat followed by 3-4 full coats. However, I was not able to get perfectly consistent results from each horizontal pass leaving me with some horizontal streaks that are visible under solid screen projections. I don't see the streaks under normal light with the projector off or during the course of 1.5 hours of TV shows but with the projector shining a solid color on the screen they are easily visible.


I am thinking of lightly sanding down the screen with 200 grit sand paper and trying to shoot a couple more coats. I am sure my technique needs some improvement. I probably need more overlap with each horizontal pass. With a 48" height, 10" spray pattern, and 50% overlap that should leave me with about 10 passes total.

I always instruct that 60% overlap is best. After the last "normal coat", another "Duster" shot from 14" and with 60% overlap will effectively eliminate any horizontal lines.


If you practice the 60-40 rule, you should not have any issues at all later on spraying to SF coats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by MississippiMan /forum/post/18435386


I always instruct that 60% overlap is best. After the last "normal coat", another "Duster" shot from 14" and with 60% overlap will effectively eliminate any horizontal lines.


If you practice the 60-40 rule, you should not have any issues at all later on spraying to SF coats.

I have spent about 30 minutes searching for the 60-40 rule without luck. Are you just refering to 60% overlap and 40% non-overlap or is there something I am missing? Thanks for the help.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by robfive /forum/post/18436256


i have spent about 30 minutes searching for the 60-40 rule without luck. Are you just referring to 60% overlap and 40% non-overlap or is there something i am missing? Thanks for the help.

Coming after the prior paragraph as that reference did, I thought the "math" made it self evident.


60-40 ...... overlap on prior Row


Something has to be said however for robfive's willingness to go searching. Many might not have done so....just asked "WTH is he talkin' 'bout?


That sort of effort will always be rewarded with better efforts in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by MississippiMan /forum/post/18437466


Coming after the prior paragraph as that reference did, I thought the "math" made it self evident.


60-40 ...... overlap on prior Row


Something has to be said however for robfive's willingness to go searching. Many might not have done so....just asked "WTH is he talkin' 'bout?


That sort of effort will always be rewarded with better efforts in the long run.

That's funny. Thanks for explanation. With the effort of this project I just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing some key bit of info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So fast forward 1.5 years. I have recently moved states and am building a dedicated theater in the new (70 year old) house. The room is 10.5' x 21' and 9' tall. The screen will go on the 10.5' wall. The new room has total light control and will be painted black and covered with fabric panels. I will be using the Samsung SP-H710AE for now but will upgrade to a 1080p projector within the next several months. Right now I am leaning towards a Mitsubishi HC4000 or an Epson 8700.


I plan to spray directly on the screen wall and cover most of the wall to leave me with some flexibility on the size of the screen. I am thinking around 110" diagonally.


Here are my new questions:

1. The texture of the current screen wall is minimal, only created by a paint roller on a smooth surface. No texture was applied before rolling. What is the best way to get back to a smooth surface? Skim coat of joint compound over the current paint?


2. Since I still have the SF paint ingredients from March 2010 (SFv1) should I upgrade to latest formulation (SFv2)? I'm thinking "no".


I have the house to myself this weekend. If all goes well I will have a Silver Fire wall be the end of it.
 

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Hi robfive!


Sand down the existing paint using a large (3"x8") Sanding sponge "dry".

Use a light touch, sweeping across large areas. Your not so much trying to drastically

remove layers of paint as you are the surface texture.


All you need to do is touch the existing surface and register in your mind how it feels, and then judge your sanding effort accordingly. When the surface feels smoother, your where you should be.


Then ya gotta Prime. Here's where things vary. Sometimrs, if the surface already feels decidedly smooth...almost "slick-ery", you can simply spray on to coats of a bright white primer and proceed apace. Other times, rolling on Primer using a 3/8" Nap roller and then doing one last light sanding reaaly gets you a glass smooth surface.


It's a judgement call that's best not rushed though. Your end results might well be totally dependent upon the degree of effort and the amount of time you alot.


Paint-wise....the older formula / components are still valid. The newer reflective components do up the gain potential though, and reduce granularity in the lower gain versions. I'd suggest SF 3.O since you will eventally upgrade the PJ. YOu don't want to ovedrdo the gain if a newer PJ has 2400+ Lumens, nor use too dark a shade should that PJ posses a big jump in contrast performance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Sounds good! I'm off to get a sanding sponge and some primer. Hopefully paint will be spraying this afternoon!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by robfive /forum/post/21167764


Sounds good! I'm off to get a sanding sponge and some primer. Hopefully paint will be spraying this afternoon!

By this afternoon I meant this Sunday afternoon. I got the wall prepped, ready to be sprayed in the morning. After trying to sand the current wall paint smooth I decided to go with a couple light coats of joint compound instead. It smoothed things out well but also made quite a mess while sanding. I'll shoot a couple coats of primer and then begin with the duster coats of SFv1 3.0.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by robfive /forum/post/21173895


By this afternoon I meant this Sunday afternoon. I got the wall prepped, ready to be sprayed in the morning. After trying to sand the current wall paint smooth I decided to go with a couple light coats of joint compound instead. It smoothed things out well but also made quite a mess while sanding. I'll shoot a couple coats of primer and then begin with the duster coats of SFv1 3.0.

Well awwwwllllriteee then! Keep us up to date and take pics along the way as you go if possible


(...people grow weary of only seeing my own efforts, I'm sure! )
 
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