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Hello,


I am looking for suggestions for the installation of my D* 5LNB dish. The tech out this morning gave us options on the left side of the house near where the coax currently comes in. Unfortunately, this involves stringing four or five ugly coax cables down the side of the house. He left us with a coupla days to think it over, so I started looking at our options.


On the right side of the house, above the garage and attic, I have dormer windows. If I were to put the dish on this side of the house, cables draped from the roof is no longer a necessity. I've marked this spot on the picture below with a red dot. The D* installer didn't provide the right side of the house as an option though, and I assume it is because of the issue with the ground. My first question is, based on the picture attached, would it be feasible to run a ground wire to the other side of the house? Would this provide the required protection against a surge? Are there any other issues to consider when looking at this spot as a position for dish placement?


And question number two: if I were to hire an installer with my priorities at heart and not D*'s... any guesses at how much it would set me back to get this dish installed, ground run, and four coax cables strung through the house?


Thanks for the help!

 

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While I don't see the picture, you're most likely right about grounding issues being the cause for him not presenting the location you describe as an option.


Following NEC rules is the problem, and should the installer follow those rules, he'll need to run all 4 cables with a #17 messenger wire from the dish to a ground block outside the home prior to entering the house with those cables. The ground block must be within 20 feet of the common ground, and use a #10 solid copper wire from the ground block to the common ground. Again, the #10 solid copper wire cannot exceed 20 feet.


If a D* installer does not follow these rules then he is in jeopardy of losing his job if he gets a QC fail.


You may be able to get an independent which will ignore National Electric Code, but I can't say what they'll charge. Remember too that these rules were created with your safety in mind, and not aesthetics. I've been told also that ignoring proper grounding can invalidate homeowners insurance with some companies if there is an electrical problem resulting from it.
 
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