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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This may be a little off the path of this forum and if so I apologize.


I've recently come across this Superbit format for certain DVDs. I haven't viewed one as of yet, but it intrigues me that they profess to be a much higher quality (video and audio?) than other DVDs. In fact, I've heard that the Superbit format is as close to HDTV quality as one can get without HDTV hardware.


Can anyone relay their experiences with the Superbit format?


Thank you.


MikeyG


:)
 

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A Superbit DVD is the same format as other DVDs (not higher resolution like HD) but eliminates extras and audio commentaries to fit one movie on a DVD with the maximum bitrate, many times almost double the bitrate of regular DVD movies. They also include both DD5.1 and a DTS audio track. The higher bitrate will help allow for higher picture quality during fast motion scenes, where a lower bitrate (due to MPG2 compression) would lower the quality during fast motion scenes. So some movies can take advantage of the higher bitrate while others with little or no fast motion may not be very noticeable a difference. I wouldn't compare it to HD however.
 

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If you search through the digital software forum, you’ll find lots of info about many of the Superbit titles.
 

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Plus, Superbit is a brand name used by Columbia-Tristar and DVDs of similar quality are released by other studios (X-Men, for example) but they, of course, don't use the Superbit moniker.
 

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The higher bitrate definitely makes a huge difference when viewing on high quality TVs like HD-ready monitors and plasma or LCD displays. I don't htink they make any difference on interlaced 4x3 displays. The difference is marginal even on HD-ready projection displays, I think, lower than 56".


It's all about the quality of your TV, the resolution, the contrast, proper convergence alignment, etc. If all those things are good, you'll benefit from 9 mbps or more. Otherwise, you'll see virtually the same image you'd have seen if the bitrate had been 5 or 6 mbps.


You should note, though, on ANY tv there is a huge difference between 4 mbps and 5-5.5 mbps. That's why most movies appear on dual layer disks, regardless of the special features, so that they can take up more than 4.3 GB worth of data. And a lot of movies go beyond the layer break in order to achieve 5 or 6 mbps. That's the smart decision. And that makes much more of a difference than super-bitting it to 9 or more. Especially considering superbit almost always means a second disk is necessary, which adds a few dollars to the wholesale cost, translating to at least $5 to the retail cost, which is a signifcant threshold for a lot of people.
 

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Superbit movies also have little or no vertical filtering of detail (pre-encoding). This goes hand in hand with the higher bitrate.
 

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Quote:
That's why most movies appear on dual layer disks, regardless of the special features, so that they can take up more than 4.3 GB worth of data. And a lot of movies go beyond the layer break in order to achieve 5 or 6 mbps. That's the smart decision. And that makes much more of a difference than super-bitting it to 9 or more. Especially considering superbit almost always means a second disk is necessary, which adds a few dollars to the wholesale cost, translating to at least $5 to the retail cost, which is a signifcant threshold for a lot of people. [/b]
Note that another reason pretty much all commercial releases are dual-layer these days is to combat piracy. A single layer DVD is trivial to copy onto a DVD-R with no quality loss whatsoever, whereas a dual-layer disc that's bigger than 4.7GB must be recompressed and extras must be removed.
 

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That's what I thought, but others here pointed out that the copying software now can easily split the movie across two DVD-Rs.
 
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