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Speaking of logic, or lack of it, it sure would have made sense for the boys to ask Mrs. Butters to stick around and help out in the final battle. Why go off to the woods and bunnies when Chuck's about to end it all.
I'm actually annoyed they didn't add her to the cast. Too few characters now days. They could have really had fun with her character by showing her wrenching on the cars, fixing radiators and other funny things you wouldn't expect - like when she mentioned waxing the car.

"I cleaned all the guns. In the process, I noticed the sight on the colt was a bit off to the left. It's calibrated now. You wouldn't want to miss and waste those witch-killing bullets...."
 

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Supernatural boss previews Amara's return



God has a sister. That was one of Supernatural's greatest twists when the series introduced Amara, otherwise known as the Darkness. She was the dark to God's light, and for much of her existence, Chuck kept her locked away. So when she broke free, fans expected a major sibling showdown. Instead, the brother-sister duo ended season 11 amiably. And since then, Amara spends most of her days in Reno.

But when your brother becomes the Big Bad you once were, it's hard to stay out of things. After all, as Dean has said multiple times this season, if God and Amara balance out the universe, you can't kill one without killing the other. "She will find herself pulled back in, just kind of inevitably," co-showrunner Andrew Dabb says of Amara.

"In season 11, she made the choice to give up on vengeance and essentially try to work things out with Chuck. They've had their bumps along the way. I wouldn't say they have the best relationship, but it's one thing to not have the best relationship, and it's another thing to turn against your only sibling," Dabb continues. "So, when she gets called back in, I think the question is: Is she coming back as an ally to our guys or is she coming back in as a spoiler, someone to throw a wrench in the works in terms of their plans to hopefully, fingers crossed, stop God?"

And with six episodes remaining in the series, we'll start to piece together that puzzle when Amara returns in this Thursday's episode.

Supernatural airs Thursdays at 8 p.m. ET/PT on the CW.

 

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‘Supernatural’ Director Matt Cohen on Setting Up Castiel’s Big News and Bringing ‘a Little Soap Opera to Sci-Fi’

SPOILER ALERT: Do not read if you have not watched “Gimme Shelter,” the 15th episode of “Supernatural’s” final season.

With only a handful of episodes left before The CW’s long-running demon-hunting drama “Supernatural” signs off for good, every line of dialogue, every frame of footage and every decision — from guest star casting to guest director hiring — counts. Matt Cohen, who got his start on the show playing young John Winchester in 2008, admits he was certainly feeling the weight of that responsibility when he stepped on set to direct “Gimme Shelter,” the 15th episode of the final season.

“There was all the pressure, but I just wanted to do the homework and I tried to do the homework as much as possible,” Cohen tells Variety. “I wanted to give the audience enough to satisfy them a little bit, but also enough to dissatisfy them so they come back next week. That’s what I was aiming for.”

“Gimme Shelter,” which was penned by staff writer Davy Perez, was a dialogue-heavy episode that featured two seemingly distinct stories, for which Cohen focused on the common emotional tonality. Half of the episode featured Dean (Jensen Ackles) and Sam (Jared Padalecki) reconnecting with God’s sister Amara (Emily Swallow), at first because they need her to get to God, who is busy destroying the other universes. But their time with her delivers the all-important revelations that she is not actually the first born, but God’s twin (“creation and destruction, light and dark, balance”), as well as why she really brought the Winchesters’ mother Mary (Samantha Smith) back from the dead a few years earlier. The other half of the episode focused on Castiel (Misha Collins) and Jack (Alex Calvert) on the case of deaths and disappearances of people within a religious group.

“I wanted the scenes to bounce off of each other and you’re battling two different predicaments, but very similar. Each of the four characters in these scenes — Cass, Jack, Amara and Dean — are fighting for their own thing for their own reason, therefore living their own truth in the eyes of God,” Cohen says.

In order to truly sell the various levels of emotions in the episode, Cohen notes he didn’t want to rely on fancy camerawork or elaborate setups, but instead focus on tight closeups of the actors’ faces.

“I had come off working on a soap opera a few years ago and there is something in me that soap operas do very well, and it can be really irritating to the actors a lot of the time [but] the camera will just sit on your face until your face sells the moment, and that’s your cut point,” he explains. “I tried to bring a little soap opera to the sci-fi experience.”

Here, Cohen talks with Variety about his experience directing “Gimme Shelter,” including setting up the seemingly cryptic news Castiel has to deliver to Dean.

Right up front in the episode, it is stated that Castiel and Jack’s case is quote-unquote just a murdered kid, but the show has proven before that quote-unquote just people are often the worst monsters these guys will face. What went into your shot style selection for those scenes, in order to still bring a creepy and mysterious, even if not otherworldly, vibe?

As a new director the only things I’ve had a chance to direct are action-based, so when I got this episode I was a bit flustered that there wasn’t a huge fight sequence and there wasn’t a car chase or any stuff like that. I read the script several times and to me it became a script of characters and really just each person dealing with their own truths and letting these truths intersect with each other, so I decided to let the faces of the actors really tell the story. It’s the traditional way that stories have been told in Hollywood for so long, without doing too much, so I thought, “Let me keep it more simple and let me let these actors work. Let me get out of their way and let me let them perform.” So I wanted to keep the creepy in the eyes of the actors. And you’ve got Jack and Cass on an emotional journey, and there’s a love story there between the two of them, and there’s a love story between those two and the boys, and I wanted that to play out, too. I knew they would be able to deliver a performance to me. If I said, “Misha, this is what we’re doing, just do it,” and then let the camera run until what I was looking for comes out, that’s what they did. Because they’re such pros, it came rather quickly. The caliber of actors that I was working with, including my guest stars, are some of the best that are doing it in television, and I wanted that to be portrayed.

What went into calibrating the emotions Castiel and Jack exhibited with each other versus with the group members? Castiel, for example, seemed more open and raw when speaking about Jack during that group meeting than he has been in a long time.

Everybody loves Castiel, he’s our favorite angel, but he can be a dry presence. There are these moments in the truck where Cass and Jack are driving and this information gets dropped on Cass about what Jack is planning to do, and I wanted to see what Misha would do with that. He’s been this character for a long time and I didn’t want to steer him off his course, but I pushed him and I let the camera run for a few takes in a row, and I thought what we got was really interesting: It’s a complete internal battle of Cass sitting there and trying to deal with and trying to comprehend the sacrifice that Jack is willing to make for the boys to forgive him — and how irritated and somber at the same point that made Cass. It is a little more than we typically see from Castiel, but it’s also not outside the realm of Castiel, and that’s some of the most honest Cass and Jack we get to see. It’s a father-son talk and the talk you don’t want to have. It was, “Hey I know you’re my loved one, but you’re going to have to pull the plug on me if you want everybody to survive,” and that’s not easy information to digest. [Misha] just allowed it to fully affect him, and I think what you see in that scene is shades of Misha as a father intertwine with Cass’ feelings for Jack. And you’ve got to let that happen. I don’t want to be the director that gets in the way of these guys. I want these guys to deliver the performance that they know their character should be delivering.

Similarly, when Dean told Amara he would never hurt her, he was emotional doing so. Is their connection too strong to let him go through with the plan?

Sam and Dean are the “find a way” guys: They’re going to find a way and if, in the process, it means betraying or hurting someone that either one of them has developed feelings for, unfortunately, their eyes are on the prize and that prize is life and mankind. I think Dean’s feelings are completely real towards Amara, and Amara’s towards Dean, and there are moments of, “Can I really trust you? Should I really trust you?” It’s the same moment when anybody tells you something drastic. No matter how long you know them, you still look across the table, and in your mind you’re going, “Is this their truth, or is this THE truth?” And I think everybody’s battling that, and it reflects a lot of what’s going on in society right now: Every human in this country is living in their own truth, so therefore everything outside their truth is wrong, and they’re going to fight against what they think is wrong. And I think Amara and Dean are at that point. They want to be in the same fight, but the fight’s never going to be the same when you’re dealing with a supernatural being and you’re dealing with Dean trying to save mankind and stop God. But Emily and Jensen, they sit across the table from each other and magic is going to happen. They’re saying a million different things within their expressions. That’s what good actors do, and you’ve got to let good actors be good actors. The scenes between Amara and Dean are some of the strongest acting scenes I’ve ever seen on television.

There are a few moments in the episode that set up things to be paid off in another director’s episode, from Sylvia getting in the police car, which is being driven by the crossroads demon, to Cass saying he has something important to tell Dean, but not actually saying what that thing is. How much did you need to know about what’s to come with those pieces in order to get what you wanted?

Honestly, I was trying to avoid overselling fake moments, but I wanted to put the weight on the God storyline, with the pastor and the soup kitchen and the major, major difference in how our characters in this episode all view God and are dealing with God. I wanted to set up stuff that I felt would lend itself to the future episodes [in that way], but “Supernatural” keeps its secrets. I know a little bit; I just know barely more than you know. And you have a feeling, just being a part of it for 10 years, but this is the end, so I didn’t know how it was going to unfold and that information wasn’t shared with me. But there are setups and it is previewing what I think is some very heavy end-of-the-world type stuff [so] I need to get the audience thinking, “God may be watching this episode. God may be looking down on these circumstances and hearing these conversations. Is God speaking through our pastor? Maybe. Is God trying to put messages through Castiel to Dean? Maybe.” I don’t want to rule out anything, but I don’t want to oversell an abundance of false fronts to the audience, so I tried to keep it relevant and within the wheelhouse of “Supernatural,” which is, there is always a bigger story happening here.

Since lingering on actors’ faces was so important to this episode, what options did you actually have Misha throw out for what Cass needed to tell Dean in order to elicit a reaction from Jensen?

Listen, even if I did want Misha to say something, he would probably say whatever he wants. That sentence probably went something like, “Dean, I have something to tell you: This is the last shot and I’m going the eff home now.” Those guys are such pros that they can be within a moment and hop right out of that moment so well. I did tell Misha — I pushed him in a direction for that final scene and he didn’t want to go in the direction I was pushing him and we had a collaborative talk that ended up in what you see on the screen, and I think we both won. He had a take on it, I had a take on it and we met in the middle, and what you got was this actually terrified moment of Dean going, “Wait a minute, what’s going on?” and Cass going, “I don’t want to say to you what I have to say to you” and that’s where we ended up. There’s always the, “Oh I wish at the end of the episode I could shoot one more take and one more setup of Cass sitting on his hands and knees with Dean, and they’re emotional and you see what they’re going to say” — but that’s for next week!

 

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Supernatural send-off: A.J. Buckley, Travis Wester reflect on their Ghostfacers journey

"It was a high point of my career," Wester says of his time on the show.

They face the ghosts when the others will not. (Sam and Dean not included, of course.)

17 episodes into Supernatural's first season, Sam (Jared Padalecki) and Dean Winchester (Jensen Ackles) came across Ed Zeddmore (A.J. Buckley) and Harry Spangler (Travis Wester), two nerdy, self-proclaimed paranormal investigators and the co-creators of the Hell Hound's Lair website. Needless to say, Ed and Harry didn't understand the paranormal quite the way Sam and Dean did, and as a result, Sam and Dean saved their lives before ultimately tricking them into thinking a Hollywood producer was interested in their idea for a ghost-hunting reality show.

Cut to season 3 of Supernatural, and fans got to witness an episode of that reality show, titled "Ghostfacers," in an hour that remains one of the series' most creative. EW spoke with A.J. Buckley and Travis Wester about their journey as the fan-favorite duo.

Phase I: Love at first geek

Both Buckley and Wester had connections to Supernatural, the then-WB series, when their auditions came along, but they wouldn't meet each other until they were cast.

TRAVIS WESTER: Jensen and I go way back. I was working on a show called Mr. Rhodes and he was the heartthrob on that show. Then he went over to Days of our Lives and I got a guest-starring role so we hung out there. I saw that he got the Supernatural pilot and then I saw that the pilot went and I was really excited for him. I didn't really think anything of it. And then I got an audition for Supernatural, went in and read for it and I booked it. I was stoked! And that was it. I thought it was funny that I got hired to work on the same show as Jensen AGAIN, the third time. There's not too many actors where you get on the same show repeatedly.

A.J. BUCKLEY: David Nutter, who directed the pilot, is a really close friend of mine. He's the reason I came down to Los Angeles. I did a movie with him and on his advice, I convinced my parents to come down. I got a call from my manager at the time and he said, "I submitted you for that show Supernatural, I don't know if they think you're quite right for it. Do you want to reach out to Nutter?" So I did and the audition came through. I went in and I think before I got to the parking lot they called and said I got it. I remember seeing Travis in the room because I recognized him from EuroTrip and I thought he was a really funny guy.

WESTER: When they said A.J. Buckley is going to be the other guy, I was not familiar with him. But we worked on season 1, we did the "Hell House" episode, and he was just a top man. And it was cool because it shot up in Vancouver and A.J. was from Vancouver so it was really great to have a buddy that knew the area.

BUCKLEY: Travis and I were like Step Brothers when we met. It was like, "Did we just become best friends?" We had a really good energy together. But I had no clue then what it was, we were just playing these nerdy guys.

WESTER: We had a great time shooting that first episode and I kind of assumed that was it. So to get that call that we were going to come back, I was really stoked.

BUCKLEY: We did that first episode and then I think Nutter texted me and said, "Everybody loved it and I think they're gonna bring you guys back."

Phase II: "Ghostfacers"

Two months after the end of the 07-08 writers strike, when reality television was booming, Supernatural made a reality series of its own. Shot like an actual ghost-hunting show would be — meaning handheld cameras and all-too-serious confessionals — season 3's "Ghostfacers" follows Ed, Harry, and their team of hunters as they enter Morton House, the most haunted place in America.

WESTER: What the writers strike did is it created an immense market for these non-scripted television shows and that's really when you saw the advent of these ghost-hunting shows. So they had the idea of, "Let's do a ghost-hunting show but have it be like The Office, let's do confessionals and interviews." And what a great idea.

BUCKLEY: I was sent the "Ghostfacers" episode and I f---ing could not stop laughing reading it. I was like, "Are you kidding me? This is so awesome!" We went up there and we met Dustin [Milligan] and Brittany [Ishibashi] and Austin [Basis]. Everyone got along, the improv was there, it was a perfect moment that still hasn't happened again in my career.

WESTER: I didn't read the script [right away]. I figured it would be the Hell Hounds guys come back. I get on the plane and I see Brittany [Ishibashi] and we'd worked together before. I sit down and I read it and it's Harry and Ed by the fire, and I realized what they were doing and I realized, "Oh my god this whole episode is going to be me and A.J. basically." I still remember turning around in my seat and looking at Brittany and pointing at the script with my eyes super wide and her eyes go wide and she just nods slowly. I was blown away. By far and away the most creative piece of writing for a TV show I had personally been involved with to that point and maybe even since.

BUCKLEY: Jared and Jensen I remember loved it because they worked like two days. But to show up on somebody's set and it's their show and for them to allow us to, in a sense, take over, some actors could get bent out of shape. But they just embraced it. They're such great human beings anyways, but they're just always down to riff.

WESTER: In terms of the technical aspects of the production, it was a 360-degree set so what that means is you could swing the camera anywhere and you wouldn't hit a crew person. So basically they would hit the bell, everything would start going, and then crew left the set entirely and it was just the actors with their cameras. It was liberating. Not having the crew on set, it really created this environment where we felt more free than I've ever felt on any other set in my life because it was just the actors and so the level of immersion was unlike anything I'd ever experienced in my life. That was the first time I'd ever done anything like that. And I think that was one of the first times anyone did anything like that.

BUCKLEY: We all got along and then [director] Phil Sgriccia was this warm, loving guy. He's got this little giggle that he does. He's almost like Santa Claus, so every scene we're rehearsing, he would be laughing. He's like, "Just keep riffing." We just went off and started doing stuff.

WESTER: Crew members and the director and producers got involved as well. As an example, for some reason I was doing one of the interviews and they were like, "What scares you?" I said I didn't like rats. So I made his character decision in the moment. I think I said, "Rats are the rats of the world" and Phil [Sgriccia] thought that was funny. So what he did is he had props put a rat prop in a room that I was supposed to walk into but he didn't tell me. So we opened the door and I saw this rat, I ran with it — literally, I think I ran away. So the whole crew got to get involved and that was really fun.

Phase III: The impact

The Ghostfacers would go on to get their own web series, while also returning for two more episodes of Supernatural, with their final appearance occurring in season 9.

BUCKLEY: Phil [Sgriccia] called us and was like, "[Show creator] Eric Kripke wants to have a meeting with you and Travis." We thought we were in trouble and then we show up and there's like 10 or 12 people in the room at Warner Bros. They're like, "Hey we're thinking maybe we do a spin-off with you guys, like a web series." We're like, "Holy s---!"

WESTER: It was one episode of a show but everyone really responded super positively to it and I think that was such a blessing because when you're in television, you don't get that response, you don't get that feedback from the people who are actually watching you perform. The conventions gave us an opportunity to come face-to-face with the fans and hear about what they liked, what they didn't like.

Phase IV: "Go well into that starry night"

With Supernatural coming to an end, both Webster and Buckley look back on the experience fondly.

WESTER: That "Ghostfacers" episode was, by a country mile, the most fun and rewarding episode of television I've ever done. It was a high point of my career for sure, just from the perspective of artistic merit.

BUCKLEY: The cool thing is our characters never died. To have lived from season 1 until now was pretty remarkable. I was hoping that we'd come back in the last little bit but it didn't work out. But still when I look back, it is, by a long shot, the most fun I've ever had with character. It was such a collaborative thing and I'm incredibly grateful that Eric Kripke gave us that opportunity to play in that sandbox with everybody. Travis and I are always like, "Dude we should shoot some more videos and put them online."

WESTER: Shows like that don't go for 15 years unless you have amazing people at the top and Jensen and Jared are by far and away two of the greatest stars of a show I've ever encountered. The way they take care of everyone on the set, the way they treat everyone like family, it's really something to behold and honestly, every single star of every single TV show can take something away from how they treat everyone on their set.

 

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I enjoyed the latest episode. Going to be really interesting to see how they wrap all this up. Just can't believe they would go down the path of actually killing God but Preacher did it so I guess they can too.
 

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Jensen Ackles, Andrew Dabb share how COVID-19 changed the Supernatural finale

Before COVID-19, Supernatural was supposed to wrap filming in early April, with a finale date set for May 17. Jump ahead five months and the series wasn't able to wrap until September, with its finale set to air on Nov. 19. But the question remains: How did the COVID-19 filming restrictions change the story of Sam and Dean Winchester, if at all?
"I read through the original draft [of the finale] when it first came out just as a fan, because I was like, 'How did they put it together?' I knew the end result but I didn't know how exactly they were going to get there, so I quickly read through the script," Jensen Ackles tells EW. "That was back in early March. And then I put it down. Then COVID hit and we all went on break and I was like, okay well I assume it's going to change so I'll just wait until the new draft comes out. To be honest, it didn't really change. How we got there involved a little bit of changing but we still get to the same place."

Co-showrunner Andrew Dabbs adds, "We did a rewrite once we knew what our COVID rules were going to be for episodes 19 and 20, and it changed some things, it did. Particularly in episode 20, there were things planned that just aren't feasible anymore."

Getting into some of those specifics, Ackles told Glamour that they had to cut a montage of familiar faces from the finale: "We were supposed to have a lot of familiar faces come back, and we were going to try to filter them into a montage. It was going to be almost a break from the story and a look at how far we've come—a little tip of the hat to the fans—and we would all be able to celebrate together," he said. "Obviously, we couldn't do that. So that part of the finale episode got nixed."

But overall, Dabb says the story remains the same. "What it did not change was the story or the emotions, or anything else. It changed some of the set dressing, it changed some of the circumstances, but it didn't change where we were going or, honestly, in a large way, how we got there. So, in that way, I feel very lucky."

 

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Supernatural Video: Jensen Ackles and Jared Padalecki Tease Dean and Sam's Ending, Talk 'Bizarre' Last Day on Set

Dean and Sam Winchester’s story is wrapping up, and Supernatural stars Jensen Ackles and Jared Padalecki recently revealed to TVLine the words they’d use to describe their characters’ ending.

Over the years, Ackles and Padalecki have frequently discussed with each other how they thought the show should end, if it were the final year, and after deciding that Season 15 would the CW series’ last one, they had to commit to a scenario. “The way it did end, I’m proud to hang my hat on that. I’m really happy with the way it did end,” Padalecki shares in the above video interview. “And we had talked about it six ways from Sunday, and ultimately, you have to air an episode of television, and you can’t just go, like, ‘Well, we were thinking about this, too. And hey, we did want to do that, too. And hey, this would’ve been fun, what do you think?’… You have to make a decision, and so we all did, and I couldn’t be more happy.”

But going into the emotionally loaded series finale (airing Thursday, Nov. 19) was not without its challenges. “I really tried to take Jared out of it,” Padalecki says, causing his castmate to burst into laughter. “I’m not saying I succeeded! I certainly don’t think I hit a home run. But I tried to make sure that Sam was in the moment.”

Ackles, meanwhile, tried to treat the final day on the physical sets like “just another day at the office,” but found it “hard not to allow that emotion, knowing how heavy this was and knowing it was our last day walking the sound stages,” the actor recalls. “It was hard to keep that at bay and in check. But I think another reason why [Jared] and I have worked together so well for so long is because we do bolster one another, and we do kind of like check in constantly, like, ‘Hey, it’s just another day at the office. Let’s get this done. We got this.’ And it was a really, really awesome day. It was probably one of my most favorite days in 15 years.”

“Which is bizarre when you see what we shot,” Padalecki adds with a smile.


 

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Found the latest episode rather boring. Didn't progress anything forward except for the brief scene with Death. Even the Winchesters as young kids didn't help the episode.
 

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‘Supernatural’ Showrunners And Stars Talk “Fantastic” Series Finale, Pain & Pride In Moving On – PaleyFest NY

Today at PaleyFest NY, the showrunners and stars of The CW’s Supernatural gathered to reflect on the series’ 15-season run, teasing what’s to come in a finale that’s now less than a month away.

During the virtual panel moderated by TV Guide’s Damian Holbrook, actors Jared Padalecki and Jensen Ackles shared their feelings about where their characters end up, assuring Supernatural fans across the world that the best is yet to come.

“I will say that the series finale is my favorite episode of all time…During the filming of that, there was just something in the air,” Padalecki said. “[This story has] been a big part of my life, and I’d be lying if I tried to posit that I hadn’t thought many times about how I want this to end up. I guess I could have seen it ending a slew of different ways, but now that it’s all said and done, I couldn’t be more pleased with the way it turned out.”

From Ackles’ perspective, the finale written for Supernatural was “a fantastic way” for the show to wrap up. “You know, this is not a secret: I had my reservations when I first heard the idea. [But] I just realized, I’m so close to this story, and so close to these characters that maybe I had my own ideas of how it was going to look,” the actor said. “I didn’t, necessarily, and the more that I thought about it, it’s interesting to think that I kept coming back to what ended up happening.”

Rounding out the panel, alongside actors Misha Collins and Alexander Calvert, were co-showrunners Robert Singer and Andrew Dabb, who gave little away about the actual story that will be told in the series finale. Referring to it as an “intimate episode” centered on brothers Sam and Dean Winchester, Singer instead echoed comments he’d made in a recent interview with Deadline.

While Supernatural was initially intended to come to a close in May, the show was forced to go on hiatus in March, after the COVID-19 pandemic shut down production across North America. And while the shutdown left the EPs with ample time to think through the show’s final two episodes—which had not yet been shot—the scripts for them didn’t change much at all during this period. “We had these scripts, as we did for 15 years, pretty much well in advance. We were happy with them, and we were just waiting to be ready to shoot,” Singer said. “We knew the challenge we had in front of us, but I think once we arrived at where we were going to go, we were just going full speed ahead.”

Filmed in August and September, the final two episodes were tweaked in small ways, due to the constraints imposed on production by COVID safety protocols. Most notably, the precautions resulted in a reduced number of background actors on set, and an extra day of filming on the finale. But in general, the influence of the pandemic on Supernatural isn’t something viewers will feel.

In reality, those who felt it most acutely were the actors on set, who joked that they felt like lepers in a strange new world of social distancing. “It certainly was an adjustment, and it’s certainly socially debilitating, because you can’t see the faces of the people that you’re working with anymore. You can’t have that social interaction that I think really sets the tone on set,” Ackles said. “Luckily, there’s such a bond with this particular set that we were able to adjust fairly well.”

While Padalecki shared the discomfort of his co-star, he also felt like the show’s cast and crew handled a tricky final period of shooting in the most responsible way possible. “It seemed like [they] all took further precautions than they were required to,” he said, “and it felt like it went really smoothly.”

A final impact of the pandemic manifested in the way Supernatural’s cast and crew mourned the end of their show. “It’s been an unusual conclusion to a series because we have been drawing it out because of the pandemic. For me, I feel like I did my mourning leading up to when we had to stop production, and it’s been sad and hard,” Collins said. “I’m grateful for this chapter in my life, but I’m very much sad to be moving on from it.”

As much as it was sad to say goodbye to the long-running series, pride and joy were also predominant emotions. “There were a lot of tears leading up to coming back to film what we knew would be the final two episodes of the series. [But] we finished filming a week ago today, and I’ve been smiling a lot,” Padalecki said. “I’ve been really happy, man. I’ve been really proud.”

“The very final moment, the very final day, it was happy tears,” added Ackles, “that feeling you get when you know you’ve done something that you’ll be proud of for the rest of your life.”

As the 50-minute panel wound down, the stars of Supernatural shared their takeaways from their years with the show. For Collins, one was “the hundreds of hours of Warner Bros. money that was wasted” as the cast laughed together on set. “The friendship and the camaraderie that we built over those years is deeply meaningful,” he said. “[There’s] no way the show would’ve lasted if that laughter hadn’t carried us through.”

For Ackles, the takeaway was “lifelong lessons and lifelong friends,” while for Calvert, it was “knowing how many people on the show cared, and how many people cared worldwide.”

But for Padalecki, the question of takeaways was less easy to answer. “That’s difficult to really quantify right now. I legitimately have a difficult time trying to parse out what part of the last 15 and a half years was Jared’s life and experiences, and what part was Sam’s,” the actor said. “I’ve had a lot of formative experiences, and I’ve grown a lot, and I think I owe a lot of that to Supernatural. I’m just really grateful.”

The panel closed with Supernatural’s co-showrunners and stars delivering their final message to fans of the show, who had stuck with it over the course of so much time. “As I said at the 200th [episode celebration], ‘Every time I land in Vancouver, I feel like I’m coming home.’ And I think the fans were a big part of that,” a visibly emotional Singer said. “A lot of the energy that went into this show is really motivated by the fans. I think we all felt it, and felt like we wanted to do the best job possible, for as long as possible, because of the fans.”

Added Collins: “Family is forever, and I hope that when the show ends, this fandom and this family carries on.”

Created by Eric Kripke, Supernatural centers on the Winchesters, hunters of demons, monsters and ghosts, who strive to make the world a better place. Holding two records—as both The CW’s longest-running series, and the longest-running fantasy series in the history of American television—it will come to a close on November 19.

Starting today at 8:00 p.m. EST, all of PaleyFest NY’s panels can be viewed on Yahoo Entertainment’s Paley Channel. To watch the full conversation amongst the Supernatural team, click on this link.

 

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Agree and the young Sam/Dean were poorly cast. Only a few more to go.
I was more distracted by the fact that they've been played by child actors at least once before, which got me trying to recall what those actors were like, how they compared to these, etc. Took me out of the plot for a while as my mind was distracted by those other thoughts.
 

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Good article but spoilers from the latest episode so putting the article link in spoilers. Don't view unless you have seen the episode.

‘Supernatural’s’ Misha Collins on Castiel’s Deal With the Empty and ‘Poignant’ Final Words in the Series

 

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How 'Carry on Wayward Son' became Supernatural's unofficial theme song

Officially, Supernatural doesn't have a theme song. From the beginning, the series went with a quick title card as opposed to a full-blown opening credits sequence. But when a season 1 "Road So Far" recap included "Carry on Wayward Son," by Kansas, something clicked.

"I had a jukebox growing up in Ohio in my basement, like this old piece of s--- that played scratched singles that my dad found used somewhere," series creator Eric Kripke remembers. "One of the songs on it was 'Carry on Wayward Son' and I played it all the time through high school. The soundtrack of the show, certainly in those early years, when it was classic rock, those weren't just classic rock songs, those were the songs from my collection. At the end of season 1, we were cutting the first of the 'Road So Far' trailers. We wanted to do a recap to remind everyone what happened all season but we really wanted to do it in a way that wasn't the same old avalanche of exposition. [Producer] Phil [Sgriccia] and I looked at 'Carry on Wayward Son' and set it to this long recap and it just came to life because the lyrics seemed to fit what the brothers were going through."


However, there's one part of the story that fans don't talk about nearly as much. "What people don't remember is that in season 1, that was the second-to-last episode that 'Carry on Wayward Son' played," Kripke continues. "And then we tried to do another 'road so far' for the finale set to Triumph's 'Fight the Good Fight' and it was just obvious it just didn't take the way that 'Carry on Wayward Son' took. You could just tell from fan response that people were not digging it. I guess if they had dug that, the theme song could've been 'Fight the Good Fight' but everyone really responded to 'Carry on Wayward Son' so then next season we started the tradition of putting it on for the final episode."

15 seasons later, even Kansas digs it, most notably showing up at one of Supernatural's Comic-Con panels to play for the audience.

For fans, the song will always mark the end of a season, though, in just a few weeks, when fans hear the song one last time, they'll know it means they've arrived at the end of the series.

 
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