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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This might not be the best place to post this thread but I think its most suite-able. I own a G15 Panasonic and among that I have a 2 x PS3, Xbox 360, 3 x Laptop, Laptop Cooler, 2.1 Logitech Z-2300 Speakers, External Hard drives, Pentium 4 Desktop, 17" CRT monitor and things such as cell phones.


These devices are connected into 4 Outlet Splitters (not necessarily surge protectors) connected to 4 different outlets in the wall. You see, I live in a college dormitory and I assume the wiring might be different. I lost power in my room as my breaker had to be reset multiple times within this month. I know Plasma draws a lot of power and such.


My friend, who lives in the same Dormitory building as me (though hes not a roommate), his computer "blew up". No fire. But it sounded like 10x fire crackers exploding at once and he lost his hearing for a minute. He had a power surge protector and everything.


My main concern is that I don't want my Xbox, PS3 and TV and Laptop to blow up because of my stupid precautions that I did not take. What are the chances of my electronics short circuiting? What are some preventive natures? Are surge protectors just a marketing scheme so that people will make money? Tips?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by akasixcon /forum/post/18154189


My friend, who lives in the same Dormitory building as me (though hes not a roommate), his computer "blew up". No fire. But it sounded like 10x fire crackers exploding at once and he lost his hearing for a minute. He had a power surge protector and everything.

Protection is always about where energy dissipates. Therefore, in locations that never suffer damage, the protector is within feet from earth ground AND distant from electronics. The effective protector has that short connection to earth. Effective protection is a building wide solution.


Protectors located adjacent to electronics do not even claim protection in their numeric specs. Worse, an adjacent protector can even make electronics damage easier. But then I need not provide examples. You already have them.


All electronics contain superior protection. Anything that might be on its power cord is already inside the electronics. Informed consumers install one 'whole house' protector so that every wire in every incoming cable can be connected short to earth ground. Again, protection is always about where energy dissipates.


Once inside a building, that surge will find earth ground destructively via appliances - with or without a power strip protector. In your case, it apparently used your friend's computer.


Your dorm should be upgraded with 'whole house' protection. You have a student council. That is what the council is for. If you dormitory does not have that always required solution, then the school is negligent. That dorm meets code for human safety. But transistors safety means installing a very inexpensive solution for transistor safety - that also exceeds code.


A protector is only as effective as its earth ground - which is why your local telco - their computer connected to overhead wires all over town - does not sued plug-in protectors. Superior protection because the protector is at earth ground AND up to 50 meters separated from electronics. Protection is always about where energy dissipated - harmlessly outside the building and absorbed by earth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I appreciate the post! It is really informative! Now I just gotta get what you said translated into everyday English that the student council can understand.


From what you wrote, this is exactly what I am going to do:


(enters the same room as student council president)


Me: Hey John, aren't you the student president?

John: Yes.

Me: I have a suggestion regarding the dormitory outlets. My friend's computer exploded because of bad ground suppressor. I made an online post about this and got a response from this person online that not even surge protectors can protect electronics from exploding. It all comes down to the way the building is built. Can we get an upgrade?


(and he is most likely going to laugh and say)


John: Uhh.. Sure I guess. What kind of upgrade do we need? Who do we contact?

Me: I really dont know, I'm gonna ask online again.


(after this point he is not going to take me seriously, I do not fully understand the situation and have no grounds for knowledge.)


Can you give me specific dialogue on what exactly to say to get these matters issued?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by akasixcon /forum/post/18166599


I appreciate the post! It is really informative! Now I just gotta get what you said translated into everyday English that the student council can understand.


From what you wrote, this is exactly what I am going to do:


(enters the same room as student council president)


Me: Hey John, aren't you the student president?

John: Yes.

Me: I have a suggestion regarding the dormitory outlets. My friend's computer exploded because of bad ground suppressor. I made an online post about this and got a response from this person online that not even surge protectors can protect electronics from exploding. It all comes down to the way the building is built. Can we get an upgrade?


(and he is most likely going to laugh and say)


John: Uhh.. Sure I guess. What kind of upgrade do we need? Who do we contact?

Me: I really dont know, I'm gonna ask online again.


(after this point he is not going to take me seriously, I do not fully understand the situation and have no grounds for knowledge.)


Can you give me specific dialogue on what exactly to say to get these matters issued?

My suggestion would be to contact whoever is in charge of the dorm and voice your concerns over the possibility of faulty wiring as you have had to reset the breaker several times in a months period and caution them that you would hate to see a fire breakout and cause enormous damage or worse, death. Suggest to him to get an electrician out there to assess the wiring and the capabilities. Have other students do the same so that way complaints are well documented. Once the complaints are on file then they have opened themself up to further liability if anything were to happen.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by akasixcon /forum/post/18166599


Can you give me specific dialogue on what exactly to say to get these matters issued?

The solution was routine 100 years ago. Exists in every telco CO so that their computer (connected to overhead wires all over town) is not damaged during any thunderstorm. Appreciate that about 100 surges confront their computer with every thunderstorm - and damage must never result. You need the same well proven, 100 year old solution.


Every wire that enters the building must connect to earth ground. For example, at home, find the cable TV wire. It has a short connection to earth where it enters the building. That is the surge protection.


But if every AC wire connects directly to earth, then no electricity enters.


That is what a 'whole house' protector does. Make that short (ie 'less than 10 foot') connection to earth. Every wire in every incoming wire must connect to single point earth ground via a 'whole house' protector.


A minimally sized 'whole house' protector for homes starts at 50,000 amps. Direct lightning strikes are typically 20,000 amps. All protectors must be sized to never fail. So that even direct lightning strikes are connected harmlessly to earth - and the protector remains functional.


For homes, this is sold in Lowes and Home Depot for less than $50. Just ask for the only protector that is effective; the Cutler-Hammer 'whole house' protector.


That is for residential protection. Dorms have more complex three phase power. That means each of three 'hot' wires must connect to earth ground via a protector. That means the electrician must get these from the local electrical supply house.


But this is what your building must have. First the earth ground must be inspected to meet code requirements. Then a 'whole house' protector must be installed so that every AC electric wire makes a less than 10 foot connection to single point earth ground. Notice the phrases. Not just any protector. "Whole house". Not just any ground. The building must have a 'single point earth ground'.


Every wire that enters the building must first connect to that single point ground. Described earlier is how the cable must enter. That is true of every incoming wire - ie telephone. All telephone lines from the local phone company already have a 'whole house' protector installed for free. Your home will have one where their wire meets yours. Traditionally inside a box called the NID. You know where the protector is located by following the wire from that protector to earth ground. Single point ground that AC electric and cable are also connected to. Dorm must do same. Dorm telephone system also must have its 'telco' protector connected short to earth.


And yes, if the Ethernet enter that building, then that network wire also must be earthed via a protector where it enters the building. Also a 'less than ten foot' connection.


Appreciate three things. First, this is how it was done 100 years ago. Second, most (even most electricians) still do not know this stuff. Third, is any wire is not proper earthed - either via a protector or by direct earthing - then surge energy is inside the building hunting for earth destructively via electronics.


You have probably seen the results. Unfortunately too many 'in power' will be resistant because this 100+ years old technology is still too 'new' to them. Your telcos does this for their every computer. Therefore phone service is not down for four days while they replace their computer.


But transistors only first appeared inside homes and dorms in the last 30 years. Therefore well proven protection techniques are only just being understood. There was no reason to use single point earth ground and 'whole house' protectors in 1980.


And finally, where do telcos install their protectors? As close to earth as practicable. And up to 50 meters distant from computers. To make a protector better, that separation is important. Protectors adjacent to computer can even make computer damage easier. Too close to electronics and too far from earth ground.


http://www.erico.com/public/library/...es/tncr002.pdf


Two structures. Each has its own single point earth ground. Every wire that enters either structure first connects to that single point ground. Even buried wires. Make little difference whether the wire is overhead or underground.


Some of the most well respected application notes are from Polyphaser. Polyphaser does not discuss their protectors. Polyphaser discusses what provides surge protection - earth ground:
http://www.polyphaser.com/technical_notes.aspx


Surge protection is always about where energy dissipates. No 'magic box' does that (as your friend saw). Either a surge dissipates harmlessly in earth. Or that energy is inside the building hunting for earth destructively via appliances. It is that simple. Your dorm had damage because a surge was seeking earth ground via computers. Your telco has no damage because that energy is earthed before it can enter a building. And because that earthing occurs distant from all electronics (ie up to 50 meter separation).


A protector is not protection. A protector is, well, let the NIST (US government research agency) describe it:

> You cannot really suppress a surge altogether, nor "arrest" it. What these protective devices

> do is neither suppress nor arrest a surge, but simply divert it to ground, where it can

> do no harm.


The NIST then describes your friend's power strip protector:

> A very important point to keep in mind is that your surge protector will work by diverting

> the surges to ground. The best surge protection in the world can

> be useless if

> grounding is not done properly.


Much of what is discussed about was enhanced in munitions dumps. Lightning must routinely strike munitions dumps and no explosions occur. Same solution is used. Any path that lightning might take through a building is diverted to earth. Therefore protection is only as effective as the earth ground. The first place inspected when surge damage happens is the earth ground. Orange County FL suffered damage to 911 equipment. Routine is to have direct lightning strikes without damage. So Orange County fixed the reason for their failure - upgraded the earthing. Fixed all connections to earth ground (ie direct connections or protectors) so that direct lightning strikes even cause no electronics damage:
http://www.psihq.com/AllCopper.htm


The problem is getting entrenched humans to accept what has been well understood for over 100 years. Protection is always about where energy dissipates. A protector is only as effective as the protection is connects to - single point earth ground.


The politics - an art - is describing all this to others who only understand sound byte reasoning.
 
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