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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I just received a Belkin PF60 the other day, and sadly, the thing has made my audio sound mellow and laid-back.


I've decided to go back to the $10 a pop surge strips, but almost everything seems to incorporate some type of filtering these days. I was set on just getting an APC P74 7-outlet strip, but the site says that it has some kind of EMI/RFI noise filtering.


After the PF60, I believe that ANY kind of filtering will be detrimental to the sound, so is there someone out there that can show me something without it?
 

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Aren't there 'high' current outlets on that thing? If you're concerned, rightly or wrongly, about filtering then you simply need to inquire of Belkin or whomever whether the parts that make up the filtering circuitry (mostly inductors, chokes) are wired in series or parallel. If the former there'll be a very modest throttling of current. However, why that should result in any problems with your amps, after all they do have capacitors in them where power is drawn from during demaning passages, is pretty speculative. There are plug in surge protectors from a variety of companies, many of which essentially replace an outlet, from companies like Tripplite among others that are frequently used for office copiers. Some even have what's called sine wave tracking which provides 'smarter' spike and surge protection. Whatever current draw you think you have in your amps or other devices, that's nothing compared to the current draw on a copier. If there's any signficant current limiting going on there, then you can be sure you'll see it in your copies. No office in the world is going to put up with something like that!


On a side note, you can buy a whole house unit that'll have no filtering whatsoever. Now, that's a surge protector and damned effective but the let through voltages can be a tad higher. Many people use that as their primary means of defence and plug in units to provide secondary protection.


There's a lot of companies out there saying they've got surge protectors that don't have current limiting. However....


1) Ask them if their units are tested to any IEEE protocols or UL standards for TVSS (transient voltage surge suppresion). Don't accept an answer that says we test them for that. Make sure they list the protocols or are UL listed. If they're not, they just don't f*cking know.


2) Ask them how they measure the amount of current limiting. See if you're happy with the answer.


3) Try it on Chang. He's a pip.
 

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