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Discussion Starter #1
I tried this over in the subwoofer forum with no luck. Maybe it more properly belongs overs here!


Let's start with the fact that I don't know what I am talking about in the slightest, but looking to learn.

I am setting up an audio system in our bedroom to go with the TV I just wall mounted. Had first hoped to find a powered soundbar that would just work and sound good. Couldn't pull that off. So now I have the following plan....

OPPO-103 acting as pre/pro with an Apple TV and a cable box connected by HDMI. The OPPO will feed a Rotel RMB-1075 amp (yes maybe a waste and maybe overkill but I have it available) that will power a Leon HzUTLX (passive soundbar with L, C and R channels all in one cabinet, specifications say the speakers have a frequency response of 110-22kHz).

I want to add a sub to this configuration. With the L, R and C speakers only going to 110 I think it will make a material difference to have a sub in the system. If I have that wrong I would be happy to hear it.

So then the sub. It needs to be connected wirelessly and it needs to go under the bed which limits it to 5.5" in height. I have found two options at very different price points.

1. Dayton Audio SA230 amp with VS8 sub and their wireless kit Sub Link XR. About $650 delivered.

2. Paradigm Millenia sub and PT-1 wireless transmitter. There is also the paradigm Perfect Bass Kit. At list price about $1700 for all three.

Which brings me to my question. What exactly does the PBK do? How can I tune the Dayton option (at 1/3rd the price)?

The Dayton amp has phase compensation from 0-180, a frequency control that adjusts the low pass crossover if using the L/R inouts, which I don't plan on doing, and a Gain control. It also has a bass boost that lets you increase a specific frequency between 25-50 Hz by 0-12dB.

The OPPO will let me set the L R C as small speakers and set the crossover. Given the frequency response range of the Leon speakers does it make sense to set this crossover at 110???

Any thought on how to tune this up would be appreciated. Any comments on the equipment itself or alternatives can also help.

TIA
 

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What exactly does the PBK do? How can I tune the Dayton option (at 1/3rd the price)?
"How Does PBK Do What it Does?
The process begins when your computer signals the subwoofer to play the test signal, which is then picked up by the individually calibrated micro-phone. The system puts the subwoofer through a frequency sweep to highlight problem areas and determine necessary adjustments. It asks you to position the microphone in at least five different locations. Configurations are then saved on the connected PC. The optimized solutions are calculated, then uploaded to the subwoofer and the calculated room corrections are put in place."

There's DSP in that sub, to modify the 'flat' signal sent to it from the program source.

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To tune the Dayton, which has no internal DSP, you would insert a DSP upstream - miniDSP has such a product - and figure out how to measure and create your own filter to be input to its DSP to modify the 'flat' signal sent to it from the program source.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks.

I don't think I need the DSP treatment for this room considering I haven't gone that far in the dedicated theatre room.

So given that I am really now wondering about managing the crossover between the LRC and the sub. From the limited information available from their specs the Dayton sub goes 35-200 and the Leon 110-22kHz it seems like I have coverage everywhere and I just need to set the crossover right and then manage the sub's phase control.

I guess I can try phase control by ear. Any technical way to do it? I think I can also manage it through the sub distance set in the OPPO but I don't know how to test for this.

advice?
 

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You can test by ear, which certainly works - you make it sound good to you and call it a day.

Beyond that, you beg/borrow/buy a microphone (suitable for the task) and hardware or software to take what the microphone receives and display it on a PC/Laptop.

Common solution, and one used by many here, is a USB Measurement Microphone (with an individual calibration file) and REW (Room EQ Wizard) - free and very good - downloadable from Home Theater Shack.

Then you have to figure out what you are looking at (if you don't know) and what to do about it (if you can with whatever you have to modify the sound coming from the equipment or its interaction with the room).
 
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