AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,999 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, this past week I have been watching several major retail chain stores sell of a lot of hard drive capacity for near peanuts. I do not know if its at a loss to the r/etailer(s), the manufacturer(s), or both or not a loss at all.


Some of the deals that have been offered include $150 120Gb drives being sold off via $80 rebates, $200 175GB drives being delisted with $100 rebates, and even smaller drives with similar sell-off schemes.


For those of us monitoring technology as it could and or will apply to the PVR world with the forthcoming HD varients, capacity is everything as having a large amount of storage capacity means more hours of HD recording.


And if one can imagine PVR manufacturers being able to negotiate large-quantities of larger drives for least amount of moola this could mean some good things coming down the pipe. Let's use some round, and probably inflated numbers numbers.


I am interpreting a Gigabyte as to mean one million kilobytes, which is 1024 bytes and 8192 bits. Thus, 1-GB would be 1,024,000,000 bytes and 8,192,000,000 bits. So keep this in mind, please.


At 30 Mbps recording rate (inflated to keep us in-check with our numbers), 33 hours and 20 seconds worth of recording time would require, conveniently, 3,600,000,000,000 bits of storage capacity. This figure boils down (divide by 8, then 1024, then 1,000,000 to get GB) about 440GB of storage capacity.


Well, if I can buy 175GB for $100 then why not 500GB for $300? And if I can buy 500GB for $300 the HD PVR OEM costs should be easily managed, especially if a list price of $1,500 is target with street pricing around $1100.


So, even though the storage capacity per platter (a platter id a metal disk inside the hard drive from which data is written and read) increases to go up, much of the associated costs of technology is paid-for. Thus, the ability to manufacturer 350GB drives in the 5400 RPM 2MB variety should be relatively cheap--but what's 'relatively'?


Ok, its Monday morning and I'm dreaming. :p


PS: Can you imagine buying a pair of 175GB drives for $200 after MIR (mail-in rebates) and upgrading your TiVo? Replacing the old 40GB unit with 350 GB could equate to 300 hours of convention television recording capacity!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
439 Posts
Sale items at discount electronics chains are what is known as ADV. Advertised to Demonstrate Value. They are often sold at or below cost. However with how oftern these deals are linked to Rebates, it's not as big of a blow as a straight out sale would be. Retailers put cheap items in their print and online ads to get people in the stores. You'll find that CDs are also sold near cost as well (hence the cheap CDs at Best Buy and Circuit City, and the expensive CDs at Sam Goodie, Music Land, etc.)


As far as pricing goes, it's really an artifact of artificial price points. The top of the line drive this year (300 or so Gig) sells for about the same as the top of the line last year (120 or so Gig).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,999 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So, your point is ...


I hear someone is gettnig ready to loss-leader a Special Edition 7200 RPM 160GB drive with 8MB cache for a lot less. BTW, what, in your opinion, does not qualify as a 'discount electronics chain' and still see in retail?
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top