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The list price of an Avant X unit is $399. Hardly comparable.
I think I looked at a third party seller that had it listed for $1,000+. Where do you recommend getting this for $399?
 

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The the ability to tailor the gain on each individual channel on each input so there is neither weak signal nor overload or even brick wall some channels on each input, change the output frequency and such, we've needed this since the first time more than one TV channel existed. Oh and yes, the Avant X will power the 12v preamps built into the Televes or another type, 12v over coax is pretty standard.
In essence the Avant X is a fully agile bank of 32 filters that can be distributed however the operator sees fit across four different inputs. These filters can be single channel with a width of 6MHz to individually isolate single multiplexes, or up to four channels wide, allowing to ingest up to four consecutive RF channels. The unit will filter out any non-programmed frequencies, and adjust all the desired RF channels to a desired output level between 30 and 55dBmV, so provides enough output power to work as a launch amplifier in an MDU or other commercial setting. The balanced level is maintained over time, thanks to it's AGC output section. In addition, individual channels or banks of filtered carriers can be frequency shifted to allow the ingestion of the same RF channels coming from different markets, or inject the OTA carriers in desired openings in the spectrum in an existing distribution (for instance, a CATV plant).

A practical example of this can be seen below, where select RF channels are filtered from three different UHF antennas providing a single wire and balanced distribution of the whole content. In this case, no frequency shifting was performed in the carriers.

I think it is actually a really affordable device for what it does.

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Those of us on these forums who purchased it didn't even pay half that amount.
I’ve never bought anything from my antenna setup full price. If anyone knows of a deal for that, by all means put it in this thread.
 
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I’m curious if my RF35 which is fading in and out could have bleed through from my super strong stations on RF34 and RF36. Is there some device/combiner that allows you to filter out a specific 6MHz band? I’ve seen a correlation: the higher the signal on 34 and 36, the lower the signal on 35. If so, my SNR with the Televes might be higher for that channel.
I don't know exactly what your situation is without connecting a spectrum analyzer to your antenna and viewing the signals. If it's similar to an adjacent channel issue I used to have then there's no good way to fix it. Let me try to explain with a couple of spectrum analyzer captures.

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The image above shows KUVS Angels Camp on channel 18 which was 14 miles from me. It had a very strong signal. Notice the steep slopes on both the low and high sides of the signal that go down 40 dB. This is the transmitter's mask filter. Below 40 dB down the filter becomes ineffective and channel 18 energy bleeds into the high end of channel 17 and the low end of channel 19. If there's a weak signal on channel 17/19, it won't decode because the SNR is too low with the channel 18 interference. Unless you can find a way to null out channel 18 and leave channel 17/19 unaffected you will not be able to receive a weak channel 17/19.

No filter or no device can make the bleed energy from channel 18 into channel 17/19 go away.

Next image shows my real life problem with channel 18 and channel 19.

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On channel 19 was KOFY at 110 miles on Sutro tower. The KUVS beam heading was 235 degrees and the KOFY beam heading was 253 degrees, just 18 degrees apart. No single antenna would be able to separate stations this close together. But by using a pair of 91XGs with the proper spacing, it was possible to generate a deep null 18 degrees off the main lobe. The magenta trace shows KUVS/KOFY when the null was aimed at KUVS. It was possible to receive KOFY now. The problem was that the null was very sharp, <1 degree wide, so narrow that even a little wind would move the antennas too much for it to work. The yellow trace shows KUVS with the null off by just 2 degrees. KOFY reception was impossible.

There's no way of which I'm aware to be able to discriminate between the wanted channel 19 signal and the unwanted channel 18 signal when they occupy the same frequencies.

BTW, the whole system is supposed to be designed so that adjacent channel stations can be decoded if one is as much as 33 dB weaker than the other. My example is fairly rare where I had an in market station 46 dB stronger than an out of market station. Even a full power 1000KW station next to a low power 15KW station transmitting from the same location should only have a difference of 18 dB, everything else being equal.
 
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