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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All the RG6 coax cable runs in my house are going to end in a metal plate in an equipment rack. I drill some holes in the plate and attached F type female-female adapters to the holes. Since it is a metal plate there is going to be electrical conductivity among the F-connectors. Is this wrong?. Should I have used instead some non-conductive material?. The coax cables will transmit modulated signals and will also be used for IR distribution.


In advance thank you for your comments.


Rafael.
 

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I would not do attach my coaxial connections directly to a metal plate. I do not understand why you do not bring the cable directly into the rack and terminate them directly to the equipment. Splitting the signal or adding the necessary injectors or extractors for IR I would do outside the rack, perhaps on plywood installed just behind the rack.


Alan
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The main reason I decided to use a plate and not terminate directly in the equipment was to order and label the runs. In my current home I just put labels at the end of the coax cables, but it is not exacly easy to find a specific end. For my new home I prefer the coax cables ending in a panel (like I did with the network cabling that end's in a traditional cat5e patch panel in the rack, and from there I use patch cords to connect to the switch).


Other than this "clean" ending, and separting the termination of the internal wiring from what I do with those cables (thru coax patch cords), I have no other reason to end them in a plate.
 

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How about using two lables. One close to the connector and one further back so it is easy to locate the wire you want. This way you have no electrical ground issues.


Alan
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by audiblesolutions
How about using two labels. One close to the connector and one further back so it is easy to locate the wire you want. This way you have no electrical ground issues.
That may work but I am afraid is too late now. The coax ends are too short now (long enough to get to the rack metal plate but that's basically it, I sure will need coax patch cords to get to the equipment). What do you think is the next best option?. A good ground connection for the metal plate/rack would avoid any problem on signal/IR transmission through the coax?.


Rafael.
 

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get a blank "keystone" plate (has square holes that fit keystone type jacks), and then use leviton type quickport inserts.


that's how I do my termination in my "server" room...rca/f/bnc/etc...gives a nice place to label, and makes moving stuff around easy. Also, the quickport inserts are ringed in plastic, so you don't have to worry about the grounding issue.


here's where i got mine...reasonable prices for a 24/48 port panel....

http://www.national-tech.com/catalog/patchpanel.htm


jacks are available at smarthome/hometech/etc, and also can be bought on ebay (I bought a ton of rca and speaker jacks there).


Rich
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Dedalus
All the RG6 coax cable runs in my house are going to end in a metal plate in an equipment rack. I drill some holes in the plate and attached F type female-female adapters to the holes. Since it is a metal plate there is going to be electrical conductivity among the F-connectors. Is this wrong?. Should I have used instead some non-conductive material?. The coax cables will transmit modulated signals and will also be used for IR distribution.


In advance thank you for your comments.


Rafael.



I don't see a problem if you have a metal equipment rack, and the equipment is mounted in the same rack.

There will be a small insertion loss with the connection.
 

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I wouldn't think the common ground at the mounting plate for the F-connectors would be a problem. If the cables instead went directly to the various pieces of equipment, wouldn't they still see a common ground via the equipment power supplies? Try it and look at the display. Then remove the connector from the plate and check again. If better unmounted, either leave unmounted or replace metal plate with plastic.
 

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There shouldn't be a problem with common grounds as long as the box is properly grounded as well. All of those coax are supposed to have a common ground on the shield anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Based on all the input I think that the best option is just test my current setup (F barrel connectors inserted in a metal plate, attached to ungrounded rack), and see how it works. If I see a problem I will add a ground connection to the rack. If the problem continues I will go with the keystone patch panel and the plastic jacks.


Thanks!

Rafael.
 
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