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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Folks, I'm just curious as to what blu ray disc you play after a calibration or adjustment in your settings to test whether your adjusted settings are to your satisfaction.


In my case I usually use "Legends of Jazz with Ramsey Lewis." I find this to be very helpful especially in determining natural fleshtones. The track with Jane Monheit and John Pizzarelli is particularly what I use as reference.


Please tell us yours. Thanks.
 

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I usually throw in Batman Begins on HD DVD because I have seen it so many times I will pick up an even incremental improvement after calibration.


I also lately have been throwing in The Incredible Hulk on blu ray. It is a darker transfer that really points out shadow detail in certain scenes. Also, I crank the holy h#ll out of the college campus scene since it's about the coolest audio on a disc I can think of.


Tekkon Kinkreet on blu is also spectacular to look at for the colors and sharpness of the image. One of the most underrated movies around.
 

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On that I use is the opening of Watchmen where in the Comedians apartment gets trashed. It's a real dark scene. If I can't see many details, it's too dark.


Another that I use is Star Trek where Kirk first sees the Enterprise being built. If I don't have it right, it looks washed out.
 

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Nothing beats a real calibration, you can get the Eye Display LT for $130, but just to make sure, sometimes I...


Spears & Munsil Bluray to check some things (the images at the beginning are really good). Another good bluray is "Hawaii: An Island Symphony" and this can be used to check for image noise, that clouds look right, color saturation, and POP.


Apollo 13 HD-DVD faces to check skin tones and POP on my old HD-DVD player, and there are some good space scenes to check for shadow detail. Apollo 13 is the best quality disc out of the 100 or so I own, the lighting is just really good in this movie and so are the cameras. It beats Planet Earth which is a so-so test disc (on Planet Earth some scenes are better than others).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Billbofet /forum/post/18187253


Tekkon Kinkreet on blu is also spectacular to look at for the colors and sharpness of the image. One of the most underrated movies around.

Forgive my ignorance but this is my first time to come across "Tekkon Kinkreet". Is this an import, a foreign film? Tell us more about it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SARHENTO /forum/post/18188434


Forgive my ignorance but this is my first time to come across "Tekkon Kinkreet". Is this an import, a foreign film? Tell us more about it.

Tekkon Kinkreet is an anime movie.


Here is a review on bluray.com

http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Tekkon...ay-Review/499/


It's very hard to describe and it's certainly not for everyone, but it is gorgeous to look at. I'm not normally a fan of anime for the most part, but this movie is more of a drama. I highly recommend it as long as you approach it with an open mind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

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Originally Posted by Billbofet /forum/post/18188813


Tekkon Kinkreet is an anime movie.


Here is a review on bluray.com

http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Tekkon...ay-Review/499/


It's very hard to describe and it's certainly not for everyone, but it is gorgeous to look at. I'm not normally a fan of anime for the most part, but this movie is more of a drama. I highly recommend it as long as you approach it with an open mind.

I have not viewed any anime movies so perhaps I'll start with this one based on your recommendation



Generally speaking, animation films look good because of vibrant colours and sharpness. I have Cars and Ratatouille in mind, for example. Most recently I watched "9" and kind of enjoyed that too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
"Tekkon KinKreet" seems nowhere to be found. Is this only available online? My local video stores -BB, futureshop, Blockbuster,HMV - don't carry it.
 

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Netflix has it for rental and it says available now.

Quote:
Hi Folks, I'm just curious as to what blu ray disc you play after a calibration or adjustment in your settings to test whether your adjusted settings are to your satisfaction.

As to the original question, I don't think it makes any difference what movie you'd use to "see if the calibration is right." The whole reason you did a calibration is because you can't tell using movies. When you are done, the display IS right. That's it. You either calibrated or you didn't.


If your question really was, "what movies look average with bad adjustments and wonderful after calibration", I'd say movies with very dark passages and great detail in the backgrounds. Something like Underworld, Harry Potter PoA or GoF, Sin City even. Mostly though, I'd go for indoor dark scenes with lots of busy backgrounds. I consider fleshtones too difficult to nail down. Anything close would be fine there. But, all things told, when it's done, it should not be on your mind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Spaz /forum/post/18217961


If your question really was, "what movies look average with bad adjustments and wonderful after calibration", I'd say movies with very dark passages and great detail in the backgrounds. Something like Underworld, Harry Potter PoA or GoF, Sin City even. Mostly though, I'd go for indoor dark scenes with lots of busy backgrounds. I consider fleshtones too difficult to nail down. Anything close would be fine there. But, all things told, when it's done, it should not be on your mind.

Hi K-Spaz,


If you don't mind, can you post an example of what you describe above? Perhaps a screenshot? I'm intrigued by ".....very dark passages and great detail in the background".


This will at least give me an idea whether or not i'm seeing something similar and hence did a calibration right.


thanks.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Spaz /forum/post/18217961


As to the original question, I don't think it makes any difference what movie you'd use to "see if the calibration is right."

Although I agree in general this is true, it depends on how well someone's eye is trained and what movie they are viewing. Sometimes people can spot things that are still wrong with the picture even when their meter is not telling them (someone could have mispointed the meter and had a bad reading during the calibration, it is not hard to do with the cheaper meters). For people that have professional meters and do calibrations all the time then this isn't really a concern. A lot of us are using cheap meters and do calibrations on occassion only.


Furthermore, doing a calibraton without a meter and by using DVE (which is a good number of people in here) are not accurate anyways, so these people need to test content and see how it looks after doing their calibration. Also using test discs that show skin tones helps a lot.


I will keep pointing back to Apollo 13 for checking color accuracy, there are some scenes in their where the lighting and color balance is just as good as it gets. Specifically the launch party at their house, people are dressed in VIVID outfits and there is a lot of people's faces all visible at the same time in one shot.


For checking color accuracy, you need to view content that has well balanced overhead lighting, as opposed to the spot lighting that many movies use in many scenes.


For shadow detail there is also an excellent 1/4 moon phase shot in Apollo 13 as well, and that is really good for comparing (2) projectors shadow detail abilities (better than most of the images I've seen others use to check shadow detail --- IMHO). There is another great shot for shadow detail when (2) separate pieces of a satellite docking in space.


Even the creator of the CALMAN software has admitted that there are a few people that have calibrated or watched enough displays in D65 that they can actually get very close to a calibration just by eye (I am not one of them)...


I know this sounds crazy, but it is quite surprising what us humans are capable of if we repeat something enough times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by coderguy /forum/post/18220521


Although I agree in general this is true, it depends on how well someone's eye is trained and what movie they are viewing. Sometimes people can spot things that are still wrong with the picture even when their meter is not telling them (someone could have mispointed the meter and had a bad reading during the calibration, it is not hard to do with the cheaper meters). For people that have professional meters and do calibrations all the time then this isn't really a concern. A lot of us are using cheap meters and do calibrations on occassion only.


Furthermore, doing a calibraton without a meter and by using DVE (which is a good number of people in here) are not accurate anyways, so these people need to test content and see how it looks after doing their calibration. Also using test discs that show skin tones helps a lot.

My feeling exactly.


Furthermore, there are movies that may not be good gauge of what a proper calibrated unit because of the way the director intended it to be seen, color may be saturated or done in such a way as to convey a particular tone etc.
 

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I have a pretty good idea of how The 5th Element should look on a calibrated system and have seen it more than enough times to know what to look for. I always use a copy of it for really judging after tweaking.


Besides, its still a great movie and any excuse to watch it is okay by me
 

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To reply to your question concerning posting a pic, do you have Underworld? If so, I'll try to get a screenshot or two tonight for an example. I've never shot screenshots of that movie and I don't know how they'll turn out. Fact is, the things we're looking for are very subtle on the screen, so taking a picture of that, in a dark scene, is challenging to say the least.

Quote:
Furthermore, there are movies that may not be good gauge of what a proper calibrated unit because of the way the director intended it to be seen, color may be saturated or done in such a way as to convey a particular tone etc.

Precisely why I would not use content to "Double Check" anything.


There was a scene in one of the LotR movies, (TT I think) that was used in a projector review shootout which I saw some time ago. The premise was to show how different projectors showed details in the dark areas of the screen. It was very interesting to see how some displays simply don't show certain things on the screen.


While I don't use movies to determine anything about my cal, many times it's awakening to see the content with accurate settings vs wrong ones.

Quote:
For checking color accuracy, you need to view content that has well balanced overhead lighting, as opposed to the spot lighting that many movies use in many scenes.

And now if you "think" something is wrong, (and have thus proven you can't get the calibration correct because it is), exactly what are you supposed to do to fix it? And please don't say to go arbitrarily change color settings till it's fixed.
Just having the idea that it is wrong, is making an assumption that the calibration process is flawed, and that to fine tune, we would need a wild ass guess to make it better.
Enter in some serious calibration experience to pull that off. Sorta like flying a plane in heavy fog, I'll trust the instruments, thanks.
 

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I check results using different movies, but I remind myself the projector is warming up. A movie that I have watched dozens of times, I know that a color might look less saturated, or a scene might have more contrast later on. It's not a problem for all projectors I know..


I can usually tell by the way texture or a certain neutral color is supposed to look, has looked rather, than by judging flesh-tones or black levels. The other week we rented Star Trek and watched the DVD the following day after calibration. It was a decent transfer, but contrast would change throughout the movie and black levels had a hazy look to them until about 1/3 way through the movie. I enjoyed it so I decided to give it another try right after calibration several days later. The difference surprised me, but it was also a blu-ray so that had some to do with it. I have some examples of the projector warming up first, but it looks better in person.









 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Spaz /forum/post/18222590



Precisely why I would not use content to "Double Check" anything.


There was a scene in one of the LotR movies, (TT I think) that was used in a projector review shootout which I saw some time ago. The premise was to show how different projectors showed details in the dark areas of the screen.

I think we agree with you, but it goes back to if people are using sub-standard calibration methods (discs instead of meters), then they cannot get the calibration close enough anyhow. So at this point their next best thing is to check multiple content they are familiar with and see if they can make changes that make all the content they are viewing better. This is too much trouble and in many cases will result in making things worse not better, so I'm going to tell these people to grab a Eye Display LT for $130 and calibrate the right way. Some people can do better than others by eye though, also it can help if you have a calibrated LCD monitor or TV to compare to, some TV's tend to be easier to calibrate with test discs and get closer to d65 with cheap calibration discs than projectors are (but this depends on the TV and the PJ).
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by coderguy /forum/post/18226179


..I'm going to tell these people to grab a Eye Display LT for $130 and calibrate the right way. Some people can do better than others by eye though, also it can help if you have a calibrated LCD monitor or TV to compare to, some TV's tend to be easier to calibrate with test discs and get closer to d65 with cheap calibration discs than projectors are (but this depends on the TV and the PJ).

Hi coderguy,

Do I understand you right that you are recommending the Eye Display LT? I was actually considering it but hesitant to proceed as I read somewhere that unless you spend on a more expensive colorimeter, you will just be throwing away your money.


What's your experience like with that unit?
 

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I haven't used it enough yet, I just got it.

There are several semi-pro users using it that also have the ColorMunki (a $400 device) and that also have had other calibrators and they say the LT is actually suprisingly accurate. One person prefers the LT over the Colormunki.


The only difficulties with the LT and the reason some professionals will not recommend it is the lack of a tripod mount and the fact that it is not "officially" calibrated to a perfect spec (not every unit is hand checked I guess). Several people have tested it against higher end devices and most of the units people have gotten are close enough to spec to defintely give an accurate picture. There are workarounds for the tripod issue and you can probably even use it without a tripod if you wish. There are lots of people using it to calibrate front projectors with great success and using free software you can get on this forum. It's a good solution, especially for $130...


The Spyder 3 would be the other one, but in order for the Spyder 3 to be accurate it has to be calibrated (you have to get an enhanced one).


Even an LT that is slightly off is still far more accurate than a calibration disc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by coderguy /forum/post/18228593


The Spyder 3 would be the other one, but in order for the Spyder 3 to be accurate it has to be calibrated (you have to get an enhanced one).


Even an LT that is slightly off is still far more accurate than a calibration disc.

I did order the enhanced version of Spyder 3 and posted at DISPLAY CALIBRATION to get some feedback on the product but I have no response. it does not seem to be a popular product. I hope I would be happy with it.


I am happy with the result of my calibration just using S&M and DVE but I want tp make sure I am getting an optimal setting. Hopefully, the enhanced spyder 3 will help me achieve that.
 

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The enhanced Spyder 3 is really good, I just didn't get that one because of the cost.
 
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