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I don't have time to read it right now so just glanced through the headlines.


At first glance, agree completely. Especially #10. Unless they (somehow) address that, I'll continue to only go to a couple of movies each year at the theater. I am up to 2 this year thus far.
 

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The audience was well behaved at the last two movies I saw, but my real problem is with the image. The image produced by digital projectors doesn't seem to have a good contrast ratio. It seems rather washed out to me. Black doesn't seem like black at all. A fade to black scene shows....a glowing gray theater screen in a theater, with noticeably bright steplights on either side of me. Perhaps I'm spoiled by the image in my home theater. A fade to black shows....nothing, as in "so black you can't see your hand in front of your face". This phenomenon is dampening my enthusiasm for seeing new movies at the theater.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertR /forum/post/20816936


The audience was well behaved at the last two movies I saw, but my real problem is with the image. The image produced by digital projectors doesn't seem to have a good contrast ratio. It seems rather washed out to me. Black doesn't seem like black at all. A fade to black scene shows....a glowing gray theater screen in a theater, with noticeably bright steplights on either side of me. Perhaps I'm spoiled by the image in my home theater. A fade to black shows....nothing, as in "so black you can't see your hand in front of your face". This phenomenon is dampening my enthusiasm for seeing new movies at the theater.

Present consumer home theater projection is so far ahead of DCI in this regard it isn't even funny. DCI units have much better fill, better ANSI CR and better color not to mention the DCI content and projection has better bit depth thus better color resolution and lack of banding. As you say though all of those things may not be a good trade for the raised black floor.


Art
 

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My local theatre is excellent.The Digital pic is way better than any film and any of your HT.I have a nice HT but the sound and pic at my local theatre blows it away.I allways do the weekday early shows and the crowds are all adults and polite.Can't beat the big screen for good movies.
 

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After completing my theater 2 years ago, I have no intention of ever stepping inside a cinema again. In fact, I just gave my son back two Regal tickets that he gave us back in 2009.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertR /forum/post/20816936


The audience was well behaved at the last two movies I saw, but my real problem is with the image. The image produced by digital projectors doesn't seem to have a good contrast ratio. It seems rather washed out to me. Black doesn't seem like black at all. A fade to black scene shows....a glowing gray theater screen in a theater, with noticeably bright steplights on either side of me.

It's not like film projection was ever any better in this regard.
 

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Good article.


Two of my beefs:

1. As far as cinemas go, one of the horrors of the multiplex invasion was also the assault on the senses. To get keep people going to the movies, theater owners apparently felt they had to make the theater itself a "destination" and hence you get concession areas and hallways as loud, bombastic and frantic with media, lights, music and movie trailers as humanly possible.


It used to be that you'd become absorbed into the world of a good movie. As you exited the theater it was quiet and you were still able to be feeling the residue of the experience, still be "in it somewhat" and contemplative of what you just experienced.


Wheres in the multiplex all such nuanced sensations are obliterated as you leave the movie into a massive dazzling party zone, numbing your senses and removing the movie experience you just had.


Fortunately for me I'm in a film-loving city (Toronto) and so there are some decent cinema options. Even some of the multiplexes have come to tone down the dazzle and offer some peacefulness to the exterior settings of the cinema rooms.

2. The cult of youth in movies.


Yes there have always been movies made for young people. But the problem is now the vast majority of films feel the necessity of skewing to a youthful audience, which affects all areas of the film making choices. Casting and writing especially.


If you look at older movies (e.g. up to and into the 70's) you actually see respect for maturity. Many of the leads are actually adults...with...gasp...some actual wrinkles and a sense of maturity. And especially when necessary, a maturity that helps with an actor having some authority. Whenever I put on an older classic movie, I'm struck by how much of the cast including the main actors actually look older than a teenager.


But now movies are made as if we are living in Logan's Run. Mature actors

are often invisible in terms of leads, and tend to be part of the periphery.


A good example is the current Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes.


Look at the lead actors in the original from the 60's. Chuck Heston was into his mid 40's and looked it, and you could believe in his sense of authority in the movie.


Look at how it has to be made now: with a guy like James Franco as the lead scientist, barely into is early 30's, but looking and acting even younger.

He just doesn't embody any of the maturity, wisdom or experience one might hope for in a role of a brilliant scientist. But...he's cast in the lead because youth sells and he'll bring in a youthful crowd.


This is probably the most bleak aspect of current movie making, in which the pickings for believable casting and truly adult, mature films gets ever thinner.
 

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Sorry, the biggest problem with cinema today is the all sizes fit all PG-13. It's has castrated the action film, the horror film, the thriller.


The Luc Besson produced Columbiana, which should be a hard R charging blood letting piece of celluloid, is PG-13. Why is it PG-13? because studios refuse to do R rated films now.
 

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I find the quality of these megaplexes has gone to sh!t. I lugged myself out to watch the final Harry Potter film. For myself and a four year old, I ended up paying $28 for two tickets, a soda, and a popcorn, and agonized through 2 hours of seats that didn't even rock (the seat backs were seriously at a 90 degree angle, I had to limp out of the theater), a blurry, washed out picture, and a front right speaker that was blown, resulting in this horrific squeal/moan/feedback type noise for better than 50% of the film.


I can deal with crappy movies and bad previews. However, since building my own theater, I find it much easier to cope with bad cinema when I'm paying $1.68 for a Blu Ray, superior A/V, and am watching from the comfort of my own home, with no patrons talking, texting, or kicking my seat back for the duration.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by R Harkness /forum/post/20817701

2. The cult of youth in movies.


Yes there have always been moves made for young people. But the problem is now the vast majority of films feel the necessity of skewing to a youthful audience, which affects all areas of the film making choices. Casting and writing especially.


If you look at older movies (e.g. up to and into the 70's) you actually see respect for maturity. Many of the leads are actually adults...with...gasp...some actual wrinkles and a sense of maturity. And especially when necessary, a maturity that helps with an actor having some authority. Whenever I put on an older classic movie, I'm struck by how much of the cast including the main actors actually look older than a teenager.


But now movies are made as if we are living in Logan's Run. Mature actors

are often invisible in terms of leads, and tend to be part of the periphery.


A good example is the current Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes.


Look at the lead actors in the original from the 60's. Chuck Heston was into his mid 40's and looked it, and you could believe in his sense of authority in the movie.


Look at how it has to be made now: with a guy like James Franco as the lead scientist, barely into is early 30's, but looking and acting even younger.

He just doesn't embody any of the maturity, wisdom or experience one might hope for in a role of a brilliant scientist. But...he's cast in the lead because youth sells and he'll bring in a youthful crowd.


This is probably the most bleak aspect of current movie making, in which the pickings for believable casting and truly adult, mature films gets ever thinner.



Nice post ! I couldn't agree more but wouldn't have realized it until I had my own theater and really began to watch movies half or more of which are pre 1970.


Art
 

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^^^ I was just going to comment the same on his #2. I spend a lot of time whatch MGMHD. Younger demo is the main movie going audience. So, which came first. Movies targeting younger demo and older demo stopped going? Or, older demo stopped going so movies got targeted to younger audiences? Big generalizations, but we're not really talking specifics.


larry
 

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Interesting and accurate article, I'd say. Still, as long as the audience is happily marching in like brainless zombies to watch **** movies, don't expect anything to change. I'm a fan of the independent and unorthodox films, but if I was a studio head, why wouldn't I want Michael Bay to do movie for me?
 

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I use to work for a theater and from my personal experience and experience with customers came down to 2 things. The Audience and the PG13 movies. Which we all know come hand in hand. Not enough adult movies forcing you to go to a PG13 movie which all the teens go to. I really tried to avoid anything below R rating in a effort to have a more mature crowd but that seems to not be the case anymore. I go to a rated R movie now and see a grown adult whipping out the phone to answer a call. (which they knew someone was calling in since they didn't silence there phone.) I've seen people have

conversations. Take pictures.


When I use to work at the theater the GM would stand by the entrance to the movie and let all the adult know that there are a large amount of teens and we will try but wont be able to silence them all and if they wanted they could switch movies or get a refund or stay in the movie with no refund if it was ruined my talkers and cell phone.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lwright84 /forum/post/20817127


Except for the fact that they don't, this is true.

You must have a very low standard of expectations. Sometimes I wonder if in our desperation to see something that doesn't disappoint us, we give movies that are middling at best too much praise just because they simply don't plain suck out loud. Rise of the Planet of the Apes seems to be the summers consensus pick in these parts for the best movie of the season thus far. I just shake my head at how so many movie goers and critics seem to like such an average film. The only conclusion I can come to is that its better than most of the absolute crap thats been released lately.
 
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