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I can't believe AVS has stooped to advertising this stuff. Though I understand the need for advertising dollars to keep the site alive, this doesn't help their credibility.

http://www.webtv100inch.com/


This was one of the banner ads I saw on AVS tonight. Still can't believe it.


Sam
 

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There's a post about this in the Forum Issues. David said he spoke with them and they said they want to advertise. For $13...I think its a cheap alternative :)
 

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that can't possibly work??
 

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has anyone actually bought this product? i'm contemplating giving it a try for the hell of it.


also, does anyone have an idea how it works? a simple lens? or?
 

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If it works as well as the spell checker they use on their site, I don't think you could be disappointed. They could at least make sure the spelling and grammar are correct to look more professional. I think I will stick with my AE-100 for 100x more money! :D
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by multiplexor
has anyone actually bought this product? i'm contemplating giving it a try for the hell of it.
Then that's another $13 in their pocket as a result of a scam.


All screen shots on their site are pretty much lies, they probably used a real LCD projector to help them claim that their design makes images that look like that.


I am trying to think of where, but you can get the plans for the same design for free on the internet. At least one of those designs involve a pinhole in a board in front of an inverted TV. It is a waste of a perfectly good TV and construction materials.


It is said to be dim, bulky and blurry. You are far better off with these as a project:

http://www.audiovisualizers.com/madlab/lcd_proj.htm


Or just an overhead transparency projector and a computer LCD panel meant for overheads would do very well too.
 

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I'm with Multiplexor - I'd like to see some REAL screenshots of these things. There have been a lot of these advertised in magazines and on the Net for years, and I've always wondered how crap the picture really is. I agree the site itself is a shocker - be interested to know what real projector they used for the images!!
 

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My first projector was a Muntz "big screen" projector that was essentially a 13" sony with a high quality lens and mirror array that projected on a silver high gain 52" curved screen all mounted in a nice oak cabinet.

It was basically a higher tech version of the above lens. It worked pretty well (the curved screen helped) as long as all lights were off, but after some time viewers frequently got eye strain.
 

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mutiplexor,

I think if you bought one you would find it is a cheap fresnel lens that you put in front of the TV to focus the image on the wall. You probably have to turn the TV upside down, which it may not be designed for! And laying on the tip of the picture tube to shine it on the ceiling :(! With the likely granularity of a cheap flat lens, the picture will never be dark, and probably _very_ dark. If those are actual screen shot of their product, and I also doubt it, then they may be timed exposures in total darkness. And the screen shots are only 360 by 240, even NTCS looks sharp at those resolutions! If anyone buys one, it is likely to end up as a placemat, or glued to a window to make funny shapes!


Mike
 

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You don't need to buy this package. There are perfectly viable FREE alternatives. Just search the net for fresnel lens projectors etc and you'll find all you need to experiment and save your money.
 

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I actually bought one of these things just for ****s and giggles. First off, it works about as well as you would expect for a $13 projector. Which means, not at all. OK? Questions at this point? Alright, movin' on.


Ok, on to how this works. Basically you get a thin plastic fresnel lense sent to you in a manilla envelope with instructions on how to use foam board or cardboard to make an enclosure around your TV. Basically, you construct a rectangular tube around your TV screen. In the tube, you build a sled for the lense so that you can zoom in and out by pulling the sled in and out of the tube. Ingenious? After the enclosure is built, you are to turn the color saturation, brightness, and contrast of your TV all the way up. The resulting image looks like a dim grease spot at worse, and a washed out tie-dye shirt at best :).


Now to the science (pun intended). First the lens. It is has the thinkness of cereal box paper and the optical passthru qualities of corrugated plastic like the stuff they use for ceiling light panels. Now to the lumen power of your TV. Any direct view TV only outputs maybe 150 lumens at best. That is then further diluted by the lens and the housing for the lens. Also since we are projecting here, the image displayed on your wall is past its maximum focal point. Remember, the image is focused at maximum on your TV already. So you have a bad lense (plastic just doesn't have good optical quality), low lumen output, and you have moved the image out of focal range of your TV and projected it on your wall. What do you think the image is going to look like?


This thing is a novelty at best. A serious viewing experience, or even passable image quality, it does not produce. Weird thing was when I was playing with this, my nephew said, "man, that is cool! Upside down, but cool!" Kids, easly impressed :). But the lense is sort of worth the 13 bucks. I use it when I soldering tiny connections circuit boards. For this purpose, it is great!
 
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