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It only took me a couple of hours to do my sills/rim joists with rigid insulation and expanding foam. It was pretty easy since the foam doesn't have to be perfectly cut as the expanding foam seals it tight. Spray foam is the bomb though. I think I paid about what krompkamp quoted for our attic.
 

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When I built my house, I agonized over insulation. Started with spray foam as the ideal, found it to be significantly more expensive than most alternatives. As much as two to three times as expensive. Moved on to research cellulose. I almost went with it, but then found that the dense pack stuff is sprayed in wet, and can take a LONG time to dry out. Ultimately went with blown-in fiberglass on first and second floor walls and in the ceiling, and I'm very happy with it.


I had the insulator spray closed cell poly foam in the rims. It seals everything up real tight. Foundations have 1" of Foamular 150 attached outside the walls, with a layer of platon outside the insulation, and Foamular 250 beneath the slab, on top of a 6-mil vapor barrier. So I'm just going with fiberglass batts in the basement walls, no sealing paint or vapor barrier on the inside. I'm happy with R13 on the basement walls. That being said, the real experts on the subject recommend a different and more expensive approach. Take a look at Basement Insulation Systems .


If you really want to go with spray foam on the basement walls, you could do it yourself with Tiger Foam . Remember that when they specify square feet, it's square feet of wall space. So in a 14x25 basement with , 8' walls you'll need to buy enough to spray foam on about 600 sq ft of wall space, not 350 sq ft of room space. I found that Tiger Foam was about half the cost of having a contractor do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Hi Walkinator - I'm not sure I understand what you're saying about permits and egress - I could get a permit without the egress? Or do you mean that I can get a permit as long as I'm planning to add an egress (which is not in the cards for me)? Can you explain a little more? Thanks! And yes, there are unfaced fiberglass batts in the rim joists now.


Jeff - I have read that doc you linked to and it is very good. That's actually where the pic above came from. After thinking about it a little (and I'm 99% sure I read somewhere on AVS that spray foam isn't as good as batts with regard to sound isolation) and doing a little reseach, I'm thinking I'm going to go with 2" XPS against the concrete and in the sills, plus Great Stuff for in the gaps (same method Andreas used). It seems like that will get me the R value I'm looking, will provide a good vapor barrier, and will be reasonable cost-wise. But if anyone has input/advice, I'd still love to hear it as I'm not going to buy my insulation for a couple of days...


Thanks!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AirBenji /forum/post/19486390


Hi Walkinator - I'm not sure I understand what you're saying about permits and egress - I could get a permit without the egress? Or do you mean that I can get a permit as long as I'm planning to add an egress (which is not in the cards for me)? Can you explain a little more? Thanks! And yes, there are unfaced fiberglass batts in the rim joists now.

Thanks!

You can always get permit as long as you plan to add an egress, that is required by code, when you submit application, you need to draw a job site layout and you need to show where is the egress going to be.


As for rim joist, you need to use rigid foam board cut into smaller pieces fit to the rim joist and the use the Great Stuff expansive foam to seal the edge, then put the fluffy fiberglass batts back, this way, your rim joists are air tight, no moisture can get there to grow mold. Check my thread and you can see how I did it or read this:
http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-Pr...s/Step-By-Step
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I'm not planning to add an egress window, so I'm pretty sure permits are out. But I'll call the inspector again tomorrow morning just to be sure there's no way around it.


Thanks for that link - that's exactly what I was planning to do...except I wasn't going to stuff the fiberglass back in there afterwards...I thought that had potential to get moldy. But I guess it certainly wouldn't be any worse than the unfaced batts in there now, and that has been in there 9 years since the house was built. Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter #26
OK so now on to the basement floor...there are some cracks. However, they are so straight and in such a perfect X shape that it seems that they must be intentional?? Should I seal these up or let them go? I do have a 1" trench around the entire perimeter of the foundation (you can see it in the pics below). Does that have any effect on the cracks?










Sorry for the crappy pics! Couldn't get a decent shot of the cracks with the flash on...
 

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The 1" stretch around the foundation wall is for condensed moisture to get under slab drain system to your sump well. You need to fix the cracks, I had similar cracks and I used a bottle of Quikrete concrete crack sealer from HD to fill the cracks, you need to wire brush the cracks and clean the debris before use it: http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...atalogId=10053
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Awesome- Thanks again for the info. The more I thought about it, the more hesitant I got aboout not filling those cracks. I am planning to use the Drylok version of that stuff for the floors (assuming it's the same stuff) and the FastPlug for a small issue in the wall.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AirBenji /forum/post/19486661


I'm not planning to add an egress window, so I'm pretty sure permits are out. But I'll call the inspector again tomorrow morning just to be sure there's no way around it

I managed to get a permit without an egress window / door - just a double door entry, no windows. Maybe it's up to the building department's discretion? Initially they wanted the windows, but I guess I whined until they gave in, who knows.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Hmmm that's interesting. A portion of my basement was finished when I purchased the house (it's about 9 years old) and I know the previous owners hired a contractor to do the work. I was assuming it must have been done without a permit, but there are double doors in the finished area, so maybe they were able to get a permit that way. Another thing to ask the inspector I guess...thanks for your input Brad!
 

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I used to live in Albany for many years.


For the insulation, whatever you decide, you want to make sure that the new inner wall framing doesn't contact any rigid foam. This will tend to couple the walls. This is only an issue if you are soundproofing, and building decoupled inner walls.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Ted - I can't imagine what could have possibly led you away from the booming metropolis that is Albany, NY?! Ok - I have decided to attempt soundproofing (really sound-minimizing I think), so I'll be sure to keep the framing from touching the foam.
 

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In the stud wall, you'd have R13 fiberglass, so you'd have to think about how much more insulation you'll want / need beyond that.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
So I officially "broke ground" last night. Day 1 of my build and I am about two days behind haha. I took down a lot of that silver-faced insulation, pulled off the furring strips, scraped the concrete with a wire brush, and filled any rebar indentations/nail holes with Drylok FastPlug. A few thoughts on this process:


- The nails for the furring strips were really in the concrete. Much harder to pry out than I thought they would be. I suppose I should have expected that, considering you use a .22 to get them in there.

- Going over poured concrete with a wire brush is about as messy as sanding drywall joint compound. Not fun. I did one of the two exterior walls last night and think I will probably only go over the areas that really need it on the next wall tonight.

- I admittedly went waaay overboard with the FastPlug, but I do NOT want a water problem. I have a pic of my madness at home that I will post later this evening.

- Drylok FastPlug should be renamed Drylok ReallyFastPlug...it sets up quickly!


Tonight will be more of the same, and hopefully the first coat of Drylok if I can work fast enough.
 

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Seems like yesterday I was doing Drylock and FastPlug myself...
 

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Chris, your walls look really good. I think the only problem you may have....and I hesitate to even mention it.....is that your french trenches may fill with dirt. I don't know if you hear your sump pump running when it rains. You may not have a lot of water issues. The problem is that once the walls are up, you won't have any way to clean out those channels if they get filled with dirt. That might not happen for MANY years or ever! It could very well be 30 years.


The nicer french trench systems have a pipe or such that you can flush out with water from an access port or a couple of them. It would be hard to clear your trenches out without having access behind the walls.


Ok, I said it.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Hmmm - first, I'm pretty sure you know my name is Ben hahaha! Second, yuck, don't make me think about stuff like that! I should probably go home and look for something like a flush-out pipe. I have never heard of that before, so I probably wouldn't even recognize one if it was there. Also, I have never heard my sump pump turn on other than when the home inspector tested it when I was purchasing the house.


I'm only covering up about 15% of the exterior basement wall/trench space in the basement. I don't want to jinx anything, so I'm not going to comment on relative dryness in my basement, but I might let the flush pipe go or install one in another area of the trench at some later point.


I'm assuming the trench would fill with dirt from the bottom, right? (If it's filling from the top, then I have an extremely dirty house!) I'm not sure exactly what it is, but there is some type of stop about 3-4 inches down into the trench. A nail fell down in there last night and I can still see it - but I'm not sure what's in there (looks like some kind of foam)
 

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Oh man, I know a couple of guys called Chris... Sorry about that BEN. I'm so bad with names, it's not even funny.



That is why I hesitated to mention it. Your basement seems VERY dry. I wouldn't worry about it if you never hear your sump pump on. I have a friend that had water problems because that open trench filled up with sand/dirt. He had to take his drywall down, but afterward the problem was fixed. His house is probably at least 40 years old though.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Haha no problem Dave! I mean Andreas!
 

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I've been called worse!
 
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