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Completely light controlled room. Measures about 14' wide x 20' deep and 8' high. Just barely scraped by size wise to make this a Theater Room. I had the choice of building a few house styles for the community I settled in and this house had the second best basement layout for the theater while it offered some frills my wife wanted and I compromised so she could have a second floor studio. This was a new construction home as of 2018 and I have been building this theater space since March of 2019 but started the plans back in 2017.

Theater Room will be treated in all black using Mouse Ears and then Triple Black Velvet wrapped panels adhered to walls and ceiling for almost the entire room. I have 60 yards to work with and am confident the results will be spectacular. Shooting for the black hole effect rather than opera hall aesthetic. Plus it's cheaper this way.

7.2.4 Sound system already in possession is:
Denon AVR-X6400H (bought in 2018, still haven't unboxed it)
Front Sound stage - Klipsch RF7 III towers and the RF7 III center channel (using in living room till theater is done)
Left and Back speakers - Klipsch RB-81 Reference II Two-Way (still in boxes)
Ceiling Atmos - Klipsch CDT-5800-C II (still in boxes)
2 - 18" Sonotube Subwoofers (have parts - need to build when theater is complete) see link in sig.

Video:
Epson - Epson Home Cinema 5050UB (own - stored in box)
DIY Screen - 165" 2.0:1 Aspect ratio using spandex (need to still build)
Panasonic DP-UB820 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Player (own but still in box)
Ziddo X20 PRO (need to still buy)

The bulk of the project has been documented in video format for Youtube (see sig below) so there are not a tremendous amount of photos. I have been taking more lately as progress is made. I am building and finishing an entire basement along with a second 7.2.2 Atmos gaming/media room adjacent to the theater room that will be a different thread. The projector will be mounted behind the theater room in a hole in the back located in the server room. This will will store all the hardware and additional equipment that will be remotely accessed from the media room.
























 

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Started priming the room is a dark grey kills. Sort of halted that while the base trim and woodwork tools were in the way and I needed to finish all that before I can clear the room out and finish the priming and painting. This is in conjunction with the media room build so there is a lot a cutting going on.


 

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You can tell how much thought went into this build. Plenty of room behind the screen for future speaker or subwoofer upgrades. Projection room to isolate the noise and heat. Really nice soffit design. Can't wait to see it finished.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

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Just a bit of info... I had a feeling that the cutout in the back wall for the projector may have been too low for the height of the screen I'm planning. If that were the case, I installed a 4 foot 2x8 stud center ceiling above the cutout to bring the projector out into the room for more accurate height and distance adjustments to make sure the seated position to the screen the lowness of the screen does not give us the mystery science theater 3000 effect. That's what the 48" to wall board is in the very first pick. Something I can install the projector mount into just in case.
 

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Did some painting over the weekend. The theater room painted black doesn't create the light void one would expect so I have 60yrds of triple black velvet I will still line about 80% of room with despite having painted it.







All baseboards are getting a second coat as well as the back walls not receiving velvet panels. The entire ceiling will be lined too. so much work
 

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It's Glidden PPG Diamond flat/matte with Mouse Ears tint. I'll be applying two coats of matte polyethylene to the base boards towards the end to help with vacuum cleaner swipes. Just before the carpet gets ordered.
Going to do something different with my base trim. I actually meant the walls marking easily. First time I got a mark, I made the mistake of trying to wipe it off. You only do that once...
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Going to do something different with my base trim. I actually meant the walls marking easily. First time I got a mark, I made the mistake of trying to wipe it off. You only do that once...
All flat/matte paints leave marks no matter the brand or color. I used a red flat paint in a room at my previous house and it marked up badly. You could not wipe it clean either. So dusting was not possible. It's the nature of the flat paint. The only way around that is to step up to eggshell or satin but then you are defeating the intent. The hardener in the paint is what protects the surface but also creates a glare as a side effect. The only flat paint job that seemed to resist smudges (better but not completely) is a watered down mix meant for spraying and in multiple thin coats. Home owners usually paint a thicker layer by using a roller and that I believe is where the smudging really gets to be a pain. It's rare anyone would use a sprayer so the quality of the surface is different compared to rolled on. I've sprayed parts of my basement but you have to dilute the paint. I also added floetrol to the mixture which evens out the paint even if using a brush. When painting base boards and door trims with a brush you must always consider adding floetrol to the paint as it virtually eliminates brush strokes and gives a smooth sprayed on appearance, especially when painting black. My doors look incredible as if they were manufactured in black and not painted.
 

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Very skillfully done Wookie, impressive thus far.

Peace and blessings,

Azeke
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Started assembling the fiber optic star ceiling in the theater room. When I first starting running power after framing was complete I decided to install an outlet up in the alcove of the room for future optics. When the time came to do it I backed out thinking I was not going to install optics and I got lazy and just didn't bother. Plus, what little research I did on it at the time back in 2019 it was way too expensive.

My wife and I recently decided we HAD to install a fiber optic star field in this space because it would not only be cool, it would be stupid to leave a big empty alcove up there. Maybe we can get away with a cheaper solution by doing it ourselves. After all, I'm basically building a quarter of a house with my own bare hands spilling lots of blood and sweat... what's a measly fiber optic ceiling going to do to me. The basement hasn't killed me yet. Off Amazon I found three cheap sets of RBG fiber optics with 380 strands each for a total of 1140 lights at $89 each. I went with the cheaper LED only sets that lack the rotating disk to simulate the twinkling of real stars. I do regret that but the end result is still pretty remarkable. Three sets will be easier to install individually rather than one large one. This way I can break down the area into three independent sections to raise up and mount. Luckily, there is a smart app on the phone that will control them all at the same time as if it were one large set.

Using basic 2x3 studs to create the sections. There will be three sections in the alcove framed to about 69"x56". I went with these sections mostly because I figured it would be impossible to install and mount a fiber optic system any larger than each section. At the beginning I was dreading the idea of figuring out how to mount over 1000 fiber optics in a large panel. Luckily, the optical kits I purchased are Bluetooth and they link together as one so i can install and mount three completely individual optical sections creating one large one when synced.









I was not able to obtain any plywood panels larger than 48"x96" so I had to section them down to smaller 35.5"x56" pieces and connect them at the seam using a 2x3 stud and Loctite PL 3x adhesive and some weights to hold it down. Not only will this lock the panels together it also prevents bowing once the panel is installed. Each panel has furring strips around the perimeter adhered with more PL 3X and then clamped to create a sturdy yet light framed panel I can run screws through into the studs in the alcove. I had originally had Home Depot cut all these plywood sheets for me but the kid did the cuts wrong and I had to buy more and do it myself so I ended up cutting them in my garage after paying a heft delivery fee to get them home. Every time I've gone to Home Depot to get cuts made I make a clear as day CAD drawing showing the panel with the cuts and the dimensions. Unfortunately, the Home Depot's around me tend to only have the "slow" people working in lumber and it's a serious pain in the ass to have anything done correctly. All the scrap was able to be used as backing for when I drill holes so it's not a complete loss.







Once the panel was set and ready to use, my wife and I randomly marked areas across the panel with a red marker. I created a grid on the backside of the panel then divided the number of available optics into that. Of 24 squares, each got roughly 16 stars. Then I placed a bunch of scrap plywood underneath prior to drilling all the holes to help reduce splintery blow outs.



These panels have a finished side and a raw side. With the panel ready for the next step, it's placed finished side up to receive the double sided adhesive and triple black velvet. The adhesive is industrial double sided tape in a 6" wide roll. It's used to hang outdoor signs made of all sorts of material including aluminum. On our small test piece using it on this plywood and velvet, to remove the velvet severely damaged it. It's unlikely it will simply fall off at any point in time, fingers crossed.







We used an old sign shop trick to apply two pieces of material side by side with no seam. To apply two pieces of fabric side by side you lay the two pieces over an unglued area that you can slice the fabrics with a sharp blade leaving a perfectly matched seam discarding the scrap. Then you fold those over, apply the last piece of adhesive then fold them back into place. Our first panel was a little rough at the seem because the blade wasn't held down as firmly as it should but we'll get it next time. Once installed it's invisible anyways. The seem is a little rough in the pic but it got cleaned up and repaired. Using a dirt devil with a bristle attachment is a far superior method of cleaning a velvet surface than a lint roller.



Now that the panel is flipped over and the holes are now exposed, it's time to feed the optics. The adhesive sort of self heals when punctured so we used thick needles inserted into the holes to puncture the adhesive and then the velvet. Leaving it there while we prepare the strand to feed into it the hole, it remained open and allowed for easy insertion.













Once the stranding was finished we used good ole Elmer's Glue to seal up all the holes and lock the strands into place leaving it to set overnight. The following day we snipped off all the strands. If you snip and various distances from the panel you can created a brighter or dimmer star. Snipping it right at the face will give you a dimmer appearance while snipping it just slightly longer by maybe 1/16 or 3/32 leaves you a brighter star.

The first panel is mounted. The fiber optic box is just left sitting on top the panel. One down, two to go!





Here you can clearly see that Glidden PPG Diamond Flat paint with Mouse Ears tint or any black paint will never be good at reducing light reflections. Once the star ceiling is complete I'll run velvet wrapped strips around the alcove perimeter to completely eliminate that glare. It's incredibly weird working up close to the panel and not seeing anything but a black void. I can only image what the finished room will be like.



The next tasks is to line the entire rest of the ceiling in velvet wrapped panels. I'd like to cut the holes for the speakers and lights and flush mount the pot light fixtures. As with the walls, I'll attempt to flush mount all the outlets and speaker terminals to the velvet panels making things look more polished.

Till next time!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Looking great! What type of content do you plan on watching to make use of the 2:1 aspect ratio?
Sorry, there was a change of plans on that. I already bought the Silver Ticket 158" 2.35:1 Acoustic Screen. I gave up on the DIY screen for several reasons.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The optical star ceiling is finished.




What really stood out was the tremendous amount of glare the lights created on what is supposed to be ultra flat matte black painted surfaces. Take my advice, if you are out to create a purpose built home theater that is light controlled just paint it whatever then line the walls with velvet. Many have used the Rosco stuff and that may come close but I doubt it will yield the same results as velvet.

I had already planned to line the room in velvet and knew I would cover these unsightly glares early on. Here's what I'm doing.

Using the same 5mm underlayment plywood used in the ceiling panels I cut strips measured to the exposed band of soffit below the optical ceiling. Just shy of 3". I lined the finished side with industrial double sided adhesive, laid the piece down carefully onto a pre-cut strip of velvet then wrapped it. Securing the backside with gaffers tape.









Here is the same shot as above but with the first strip applied. All I did for these is use my finishing nailer and pop in a few nails to the studs. Same as with the ceiling applications below. I used just enough nails to studs to secure them then used a small amount of black screws to mount them making it impossible for them fall on us and kill us while watching Bambie.



Same spot but with a flash.







Here is the finished projector pass through.



Moving on to the front of the area. A few panels were applied to the ceiling so far. I carefully measured the panels so that I can flush mount the recessed ceiling light fixtures. Below are pics with work lights on and off to show the difference. I feel really stupid and wasted time and money doing two coats of dark grey primer and two coats of black paint around the room. After seeing how bad the glare still was I felt I was forced to go the extra mile with the black velvet.


















My carpet is scheduled for installation on Sept 12th and my goal is to completely finish lining the ceiling before that happens. Once the carpet is in I'll be able to start placing speakers, finding reflection points and focus on acoustic panels. When those are complete I can resume lining the rest of the walls in velvet panels for a complete aesthetic.
 
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