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Seemed pretty lame to me on the presentation end. It did not even mention front projectors which in most cases are an ideal solution for high resolution material.


It does not mention the largest HD provider at all "CBS"!
 

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It is starting to get frustrating to see articles that pretend to tell the future when they can't even accurately size up the here-and-now. I also noticed the lack of mention of CBS:confused:.


The Atlanta paper also feature a story (front page of their Sunday Personal Tech section) last week about HDTV. The only thing the article says is how stupid it is to buy an HDTV-capable TV because they cost so much more than regular TV's. It even says that regular TV's are cheap because their technology is dying!:mad: But, no real mention of how much HDTV content is available.


Uggh!:eek:
 

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yeah, it is really frustrating. I even offered to write up an article about my HDTV trials and tribulations for a local paper. It would not have been a "rah rah HDTV" article but instead an accurate honest article on the goods & bads of HDTV. However, they said they only take articles from "professional writers" . . . i.e. people that don't know what they are talking about.


Hmm . . . I'm an attorney . . . doesn't that make me a professional writer?
 

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So, the future of TV is Pay-Per-View for everything. Did the MPAA fund this study? Thanks to Bill Gates and XP, they will be able to access your bank account directly, so they can simply transfer your money out of your accounts as your channel surf. Heck, I will bet they can even take your money when you are not watching, after all, you might be thinking about some program you hope to watch.


If this is really true, I am going to invest in a better library and forget the TV.
 

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That is the media for you. They will say what ever they want and tons of people out there will believe it. The funny thing about this is that these people who are writing for these papers think they know it all, but in actuality they dont know any more than the un informed sales guy at our local electronics stores.
 

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FWIW, "The Technology Review" is among the most respected forward thinking technology magazines around. This is the cover story. Maybe they will lose some credibility now.
 

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What a bunch of doo-doo. How about doing a little research before writing a story.


Notwithstanding all the factual errors, all of which anyone here can spot, how is this mystical content going to get to me? I am 31 years old. When I was a kid people were talking about Video on Demand, coming soon to a TV near you. 15-20 years later, it's not here. Everyone keeps talking about "broadband." Probably 95% of all homes do not have a broadband data pipe coming in. Probably more than 50% can't get it if they want it. 10 years ago my company did some work in a research facility for Alcatel and they had a demo lab set up with equipment for "Fiber to the Home," a year or so later they changed the signage to "Fiber to the Curb," now you are lucky to get "fiber to the neighborhood." At today's broadband speeds, there is just not enough capacity for video on demand, people using Cable Modems complain that this site loads too slowly, certainly video would be problematic at the least. Maybe they could do the PVR thing and you select what you want and watch it the next day, but that is not "on demand." I can't see that this kind of thing will ever take off until anyone can go to their TV, select a movie and it starts playing within 30 seconds. My prediction is that ain't happening within the next 20 years. It will just take too long to build up the infrastructure.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Lee L
What a bunch of doo-doo. How about doing a little research before writing a story.


Notwithstanding all the factual errors, all of which anyone here can spot, how is this mystical content going to get to me? I am 31 years old. When I was a kid people were talking about Video on Demand, coming soon to a TV near you. 15-20 years later, it's not here. Everyone keeps talking about "broadband." Probably 95% of all homes do not have a broadband data pipe coming in. Probably more than 50% can't get it if they want it. 10 years ago my company did some work in a research facility for Alcatel and they had a demo lab set up with equipment for "Fiber to the Home," a year or so later they changed the signage to "Fiber to the Curb," now you are lucky to get "fiber to the neighborhood." At today's broadband speeds, there is just not enough capacity for video on demand, people using Cable Modems complain that this site loads too slowly, certainly video would be problematic at the least. Maybe they could do the PVR thing and you select what you want and watch it the next day, but that is not "on demand." I can't see that this kind of thing will ever take off until anyone can go to their TV, select a movie and it starts playing within 30 seconds. My prediction is that ain't happening within the next 20 years. It will just take too long to build up the infrastructure.
Lee, there's a big gap in what can be achieved technologically and what makes economic sense to do (unless you are talking about medicine or the military). I view broadband (fiber) to the home as being in a similar stage to the PC when it first came out. A typical setup had very little memory, a tiny disk and a yellow or green phosphor monochrome display. Yet it cost about $10K (in today's money). The only practical thing you could do with it was word processing, simple spreadsheets and some simple databases (I owned serial #125 of the IBM PC-AT which was second generation). Look where they've taken the technology in 25 years. Broadband has just started becoming available - there's been a huge buildout in the last 10 years at the core (essentially infinite amounts of bandwidth). The last mile will take time and capital but it will happen. It may take 10 years, though.
 

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Almost 90% of the TV viewers in the USA are watching TV via Pay per View! These people have subcribed to both Cable and DBS. They are paying monthly fees to watch TV.


Pay per View is not necessarily defined as an "event" like a movie that you pay $3.99 to see. It can also be construed as paying for TV services versus using an antenna to receive free TV that you do not pay for.


Lee
 

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I thought the article was lame. First it neglected to accurately portray the current state of affairs in home viewing, it spent most of the rest of the article reciting the broadband mantra of the future, e.g. 'watch anything anytime' and 'voice command driven interface'. Hey, I've already seen the Qwest commercial! If you don't have any facts about how we are really going to get from where we are now to this 'vision' don't write the article.


Time and time again, when I read an article in the media on a topic that I am well versed in, I find it to be full of errors and half-truths. I try to keep this in mind when I read articles on topics of which I am ignorant. Sometimes you can't believe what you read without doing some checking on your own.
 

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BondDude,

I agree with you. It often seems that even credible media outlets cannot predict the future we all seem to take for granted.

On "Video on Demand"-- it failed once. It was because it was PPV.

As someone who has used the internet since 1990, the billing progressed from $$/minute to $$/hour to unlimited access. It was the "unlimited access" offering from AOL that made the internet explode. NO ONE will go back to $$/minute! Video on Demand can work, but it will be interactive TV, where you can search a large catalog of material not currently being shown, and you will not be charged extra as with PPV--it will just be part of your normal service.

My personal future includes an HDTV PVR, hooked up to a DVD-R for archiving! Now, if there was just more HDTV programming. When the future does NOT include an HDTV SuperBowl--everyone suffers!


dL
 

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Ok, I just have to point that that the last page of the article firmly mentions that a "TV Set" (I assume they are refering to a direct view set), can be made in a "square screen only" format.


Hmm, I guess I'm just imagining that my Sony KD-34XBR2 exists, or the RCA38, or Panny's or Tosh's 16x9 34' inchers...
 
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