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I'm writing this post to clear up a misconception I had about widescreen vs. standard pictures in a movie. It was my impression that the widescreen view contained everything that the original theatrical print contained and only the standard version lost the left and right sides of the original movie. However for the first time I noticed something different. When watching the widescreen version of the movie, The Game starring Michael Douglas, it was missing part of the images from the bottom of the screen in the standard version.


In the scene where the commercial actor takes Michael Douglas' information for CRS, he types on a computer and tells him his brother was an excellent player in London. In the standard version you can see the entire computer and clearly see the Apple logo at the bottom of the screen. In the widescreen version, you don't see the computer, only the images on the computer screen, you don't see the Apple logo.


I thought that the standard version lost the left and right but did not gain bottom and or top, does any of this make sense, is it possible that the aspect ratio in the DVD that was released was not the same as the cinematic release and this is why portions of the bottom part of the image were removed in the transfer? Again I thought the widescreen version contained everything, left/right, top/bottom, and it was not possible to miss any images from the original theatrical release.
 

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There's lots of stuff goofy with aspect ratios. Research some terms like Open Matte and stuff like that. Studios do a lot of goofy things with aspect ratios.


Not sure about The Game in particular.


Gets more confusing when you start talking Kubrick movies...he filmed for 4:3, but had to compromise for the theater so presented them in the theater in 1.85:1. So now do you watch the film as it was presented in theaters or how the man intended it to be seen?


There are lots of discussions on this elsewhere.
 

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The Game is an example of a film with an OAR of 2.35:1 which was then altered by opening up the matte to produce a DVD at 1.85:1. This allows it to be shown without letterbox bars on an HDTV-proportioned screen. But there is no way to view an image identical to the theatrical display on the typical home screen. (A Home Theater PC can be persuaded to crop the image to 2.35:1 to accomplish this goal, but not any vanilla video components I am aware of.)(I have refused to own the altered DVD, and am hoping for a Blu-Ray release at 2.35:1.)


The classic Howard Hawkes film Man's Favorite Sport? is an example where a film with OAR of 1.33:1 was altered by cropping to produce a DVD at 1.85:1. This allows it to be shown without pillarbox bars on an HDTV-proportioned screen. Both Region 1 DVDs are the same cropped transfer, the cropping is the lower 25% of the screen throughout the film except for the beginning credits which are pillarboxed, and alters several important scenes greatly. The missing image area is not present on the DVD and there is no way to view the theatrical images at home on any shape of screen - unless you own an old VHS copy of the film. (Yes, I own the VHS, the cropping is entirely offensive and alters the film, and I sold the DVD.)


The original DVD release of The Silence of the Lambs is an example of where the OAR of 1.85:1 was altered by opening up the matte to produce a DVD at 1.33:1, by adding equal 12.5% areas of image at top/bottom of the screen, because the original film was framed "safe for 1.33:1". This allows viewing on a old 4:3 TV screen without letterbox bars, and allows one to "zoom" the image to fill the width of an HDTV-proportioned screen and produce a 1.78:1 image that is virtually identical to the theatrical OAR of 1.85:1. (Yes, I own the original 1.33:1 DVD, and find it is just as good as any of the widescreen versions that followed, up until the Blu-Ray in 2009 which I also own.)


As you can see, a number of sins are still being committed to avoid the unpopular appearance of black areas on the screen. But most of the furor over OAR has died down around here, and quite often I see AVS reviews of DVDs and Blu-Rays where the reviewer has not even noticed that a theatrical 2.35:1 film was altered for the disk version.
 

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Gordon, see the "Open Matte" section on the following page for picture illustrations of how the Super 35 film format works.

http://www.highdefdigest.com/news/show/764

Quote:
Originally Posted by mproper /forum/post/19633506


Gets more confusing when you start talking Kubrick movies...he filmed for 4:3, but had to compromise for the theater so presented them in the theater in 1.85:1.

This is a long-standing myth that has been completely debunked by Kubrick's own storyboards for The Shining, which clearly and explicitly state: "THE FRAME IS EXACTLY 1-1.85. Obvioulsy you compose for that but protect the full 1-1.33 area."

 
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