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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I decided to try Screen Goo, KH recommended the Digital grey low gain. My first concern came when I rolled the topcoat unto the screen. Out of the can it looked just like the primer, and I was expecting something more "high tech". I finished the job (two coats primer, two coats topcoat, both thinned about 10%), and sat back to watch the results. A few hours after dry I watched a movie (can't remember what) and was unimpressed. Yes, it was brighter, but this could have been from the lighter shade of grey pigment used with the Goo vs. my old screen.


Incidentally, I thought I was doing a crappy job of rolling, but did my best to get it on evenly. I had no "overage" on the various sides Ken recommends to get the roller started. I needn't have worried. When I look at it now, I've got a monolithic surface that looks like somebody manufactured it.


I remained concerned as to whether I was shipped the right topcoat. Maybe I got two bottles of primer, etc. Ken suggested painting samples of both on separate swatches.


Second night watched Dirty Harry -- an oldie with a poor transfer to DVD, and was again unimpressed. But realized this was no real test.


Third night watched HDTV, and fell off the seat. Jag and The Guardian never looked better. The colors, those aircraft carrier shots, those Pittsburgh exteriors -- wow!


Had to go away a few times. Each time, coming back, more wow. No doubt its pretty well "cured" by now. It seems to have delivered on everything promised. Much greater "snap". Seemingly increased contrast, I'm guessing that's mostly due to clearly greater brilliance. I don't understand how a screen can be "color correcting" but I'm convinced I'm looking at it.


Another new benefit: The increased brightness lets me watch in lighter ambient conditions than ever before, with pleasing results. If Firehawk is better than this, then it really must be something.


Watched CSI this week. The opening section looking for bones in the Nevada Desert with the mountains looming behind. My God!


Incidentally, the swatches did dry with slightly different "sheens". And the topcoat may be a slightly less opaque, so I guess I got the right products. This is uncanny stuff!
 

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Hmm. Fascinating product. I'm wondering what would be a better way to go in my case. I was considering "dalite cut to size screen material" http://www.shopcousinsvideo.com/dalmatwhitsc.html

to make a DIY screen. But now I read this stuff about screen goo and i'm thinking of getting a (cotton?)
canvas and using that screen goo product on it. Question is, is it going to be a better route then going with a premade screen material? The cost comparison between the two options is more or less a wash far as i can tell. DIY is not a prob if it's worth the extra time and effort.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My screen is 1/4 birch plywood with a 1X3 perimeter frame glued to the rear side. It "hangs" on a cork covered wall, using a 1X3 wood "cleat" attached to the wall, cut to fit exactly within the top of the perimeter frame. Two 16 penny nails drop into holes drilled through both the cleat and the top strip of the perimeter frame, to secure the screen in place.


This arrangement makes stretching a cloth over the plywood difficult. AVS had recommended a Firehawk with grommets, which could be laced tight behind the screen. The cleat setup would interfere with this.


Which is why I tried Goo first. Ken says Goo is flexible, can be rolled up etc., so I would expect it could be applied to canvas. Since Goo is water based acrylic, some sort of sizing for the canvas might be needed first. And from my own hard-luck experience with fabric screens, it must be taut and wrinkle/crease free before you paint.
 

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I see. So you didn't use a cloth. I might just consider the plywood idea too. No concerns about canvas shrinkage that way. :)I'll be spraying it on if i decide to go this route. I would consider some bracing though due to plywood tending to warp. I'm curiouse though, what was your previouse screen that you are comparing your results to? Thanks for the info Carl
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Let's see... Where to begin?


The plywood base was with me from the start. The original covering was to be vinyl coated drapery blackout material, but I could never get the wrinkles and creases out that resulted from the in-store cutting procedures. Tried steam ironing, etc. -- nothing seemed to work.


Next was artist's canvas. Had it carefully cut & rolled, but as I remember, couldn't get it stretched tight enough.

Was using staple gun, hand stretching around edges, tacking on the back of the perimeter frame. As I recall, some kind of stretching tool might have helped, if it had been available.


At this point decided to seal/sand the birch wood and roll on flat latex (white). Soon after that Alan Gouger first mentioned the advantages of gray vs white in connection with DILA (digital) projectors.


Incidentally, that little thread, not much more than a year or so ago, started a screen revolution. I don't think there were any "gray" screens commercially available before he cited their advantages. The power of AVS!


So I repainted light gray. At that time no one knew just what shade was best. After a while, I went somewhat darker -- the equivalent of the Navy's battleship gray, I was told by a Glidden regional field mgr.


After calibration, and after the DILA's bulb dimmed (got up to 1200 hours), concluded that this gray was probably too dark. By then, Stewart's Greyhawk had established itself, and the newer Firehawk reviewed even better.


Given my troubles with fabric (Stewart advised against using fabric adhesives w/Firehawk), when the Goo came along, it seemed like a possible solution.


As it's finally turned out, I'm really happy. It looks better (than the latexes did) in daylight too. A warm light grey, with a subtle sheen to it.
 
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