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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Not that anyone could afford it, but BHPhoto has listed the JVC SR-HD2700US Blu-ray Disc & HDD Recorder

It is back ordered at this time but supposedly back in stock in Nov 2018

If only it had a cheaper cousin, like ten times cheaper.. it would probably sell very well to members of this forum.

JVC Spec page:

SR-HD2700US

It is an HD Recorder, by virtue of its HDMI and SDI Inputs, but it can also downgrade the HD signal to SD to produce DVDs with MPEG2 compression, so its a bit of a Hybrid.
 

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Wouldn't it be easier and much cheaper to use an $80 Blu-ray drive in a computer to burn HD videos onto a Blu-ray disc? I assume most people are editing their videos on their computer anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Wouldn't it be easier and much cheaper to use an $80 Blu-ray drive in a computer to burn HD videos onto a Blu-ray disc? I assume most people are editing their videos on their computer anyway.
Easier is doing it all in one with a standalone box. The Computer is still a bit of an imprecise tool with a lot a play that requires a lot of skill to use, somewhat like a Wood Carpenters tool.. measure twice cut once..
 

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The Computer is still a bit of an imprecise tool with a lot a play that requires a lot of skill to use, somewhat like a Wood Carpenters tool.. measure twice cut once..
Not really true for editing recordings. Video ReDo is straight forward to use and was designed specifically to edit HDTV recordings. Has frame-accurate editing and automatic commercial detection which works very well. Takes me about 6 min to edit out the commercials from a 1hr recording.
 
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It is an HD Recorder, by virtue of its HDMI and SDI Inputs,
I would be willing to bet the HDMI input will only record from non-HDCP protected HDMI sources such as video cameras and game consoles (for recording video game play only).
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Yep its non HDCP only, but SD shouldn't be a problem.. both HD and SD have ways around capture 'problems'.. especially since the tuner/source would be external to the box.

I 'luv' VideoRedo.. but it still takes a computer savy user to learn how to start up a capture App, import the footage, then scrub all the commercials.. and navigate the menus to burn to DVD or Blu-ray.. a lot of that forces a person to make tradeoffs, and not everyone understands those tradeoffs
 

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I'm amazed that JVC even bothered to update this epic fail of a recorder, but this is the company that never admits defeat (no matter how many buyers complain or vendors kick back pallets of unsold / defective stock). Other than a slight modification to finally allow some semblance of downconverting that actually works (allegedly), this is the same box of rocks sold previously as models 1250, 1500 and 2500 (apparently the 1250 and 1500 have also been updated/replaced by the newer 1350, which is the 2700 sans SDI/HDMI input and time code embedding for a more attainable $1299).

Like all other previous BD/HDD recorders, recording/burning features aren't in the same ballpark as the older DVD/HDD units. The BluRay HDTV encoding/burning capability comes at the expense of standard def functionality and high-speed lossless dubbing flexibility. If you had the money to throw away and bought one of these expecting it to replace a Panasonic or Pioneer DVD/HDD, you'd be bitterly disappointed. Along with these limitations, you get unbelievably poor operating performance with lockups and failed discs galore. Who exactly would use one of these trainwrecks in a professional setting instead of a much cheaper and flexible PC-based solution remains a mystery: their compromised functionality is akin to the final pathetically-crippled Magnavox DVD /HDD recorders (which are bizarrely less capable than Magnavox models made ten years earlier).

The era of standalone BluRay/HDD recorders was over before it even started: Hollywood saw to that. Only the very first generation of European Panasonic recorders showed promise: they became instant collectibles once word spread subsequent models were crippled beyond recognition (and had a defect rate unparalleled in Panasonic video product history). There's a reason no other brand but Panasonic seriously tried to market these devices (Funai was a distant second bargain-basement option in some regions). Sony was the smartest mfr in the room for once: reading their tea leaves and feeling there was no sustainable consumer market for Blu recorders with Hollywood shackles, they opted out altogether, choosing to sell Panasonic a non-compete agreement for a kings ransom instead. Perhaps the only time Sony ever outsmarted Panasonic: I forget the exact dollar amount of the agreement, but it was a gigantic sum that made headlines in the industry press.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Citibear, your perspective is always Super valuable.

I am very curious about the 1st Gen of Panasonic Blu-Ray recorders that showed promise.. do you recall a model number? Other than the legion of Blu-Ray players they unleashed in Asia, Europe and New Zealand.. I couldn't find a single Blu-Ray recorder that looked promising. It looked liike they all lacked inputs, even SD inputs.

Thanks for mentioning the 1350.. it should be fun to read up on.
 

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I am very curious about the 1st Gen of Panasonic Blu-Ray recorders that showed promise.. do you recall a model number?
I don't remember the early Panasonic BD/HDD model numbers: since they were never available in North America, few of us took notes.;)

Most of my info on those units came from our European counterpart AVforums some years ago. They were prized mostly because they were significantly more flexible with record modes, lossless high speed dubbing, SD handling, were dramatically more reliable than their successors, and a couple of them could be hacked to record in close to high def via their DV or analog SCART inputs.

Like the PAL-format DVD/HDD recorders before them, the PAL BD/HDD units were far more practical in their countries than NTSC models ever were in USA/Canada. The grotesque cable stranglehold that cripples North American recording options does not exist in Europe, NZ and Aus: the only two TV sources are digital OTA broadcasts and standardized satellite providers, all using a standardized international GUI for timer program guides. Generic BD recorders like these Panasonics were thus actually useful: with their internal OTA/satellite tuners you could record television shows and movies to the HDD in true high def, then burn high def BluRays. Alternatively, early Panasonics had flexible downconversion or straight SD options to fit loads of SD material on a BluRay. Nice while it lasted, but it didn't last long: streaming rapidly overtook physical media as the "watch when you want to" choice on a global scale, rendering the deluxe Panasonic BD/HDDs an overpriced curio. Panasonic repeatedly cut features and quality control in an effort to keep the recorder market alive, to no avail.

Sony really was remarkably prescient in predicting this outcome beforehand: Panasonic lost its shirt in the BD recorder business, mostly due to the insane advance fee they paid Sony not to compete. Amortizing that fee was an albatross around their neck: Panasonic would have exited the BD recorder market years earlier otherwise. And all that went down in a market where the machines were actually convenient and fully usable: imagine how they would have tanked in North America against the shenanigans of Comcast et al. The one constant throughout the world seems to be the inexorable death of physical media: the explosive growth of streaming has made the very idea of disc recorders extinct practically overnight.

Its reached the point where if you hand a BluRay (or heaven help you CD or DVD) to anyone under forty, they don't know what to do with it. Use it as a coaster? A frisbee toy for their dog? Yet this same anti-physical demographic is buying up vinyl LPs and turntables at a rate surpassing 30 years ago: irony abounds.
 
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