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Social Justice Warrior movies, apparently. Never heard of that term before. I've never seen any evidence of people stopping going based on that - here in the UK we have a wide variety of movies shown to cater for all tastes, not just what Hollywood pumps out.
I was actually thinking of less big blockbuster remakes and Marvel movies, and more of the original series kind of thing Netflix does. Although I wouldn't mind a sequel to 6 Underground on Netflix :) as long as it's mixed in Dolby Atmos.
 
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The trouble with everything being produced for the small screen is that more and more audio mixes will be designed for the lowest common denominator, mainly soundbars and TV speakers. The bulk of the mixes will no longer be monitored in large auditoriums with powerful audio systems and multi speaker arrays in order to shave production costs.
Why does everything have to be produced for the small screen? A 75" or 85" TV isn't exactly "small screen" except to us, it runs as low as $1100 (just did a random Google search and found a Samsung 75" UHD Class 7 TV for that price from Best Buy), and UHD/HDR is a going concern. No reason why audio has to be dumbed down to 5.1 or 2.0 anymore than Netflix is following the current model right now for their own content, and the likes of Disney is doing what it does with Atmos on its own releases on Disney+. To some extent simply labeling a movie as having "Dolby Atmos" is a marketing play, but why should that go back to the future especially since even simpler HT setups can have a Dolby Atmos virtualized soundbar?

Our A/V hobby and audio mixing and presentation quality in general are going to be hit as badly as the economy.
Maybe our hobby. The rest I think the jury is out, considering what's already probably went through the production pipeline. The latest Marvel whatever or a remake of some 90's blockbuster may suffer a slowdown or even get cancelled due to the societal changes - as well as how movies will need to be made - in at least the intermediate term IMO.
 
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Why does everything have to be produced for the small screen? A 75" or 85" TV isn't exactly "small screen" except to us, it runs as low as $1100 (just did a random Google search and found a Samsung 75" UHD Class 7 TV for that price from Best Buy), and UHD/HDR is a going concern. No reason why audio has to be dumbed down to 5.1 or 2.0 anymore than Netflix is following the current model right now for their own content, and the likes of Disney is doing what it does with Atmos on its own releases on Disney+. To some extent simply labeling a movie as having "Dolby Atmos" is a marketing play, but why should that go back to the future especially since even simpler HT setups can have a Dolby Atmos virtualized soundbar?



Maybe our hobby. The rest I think the jury is out, considering what's already probably went through the production pipeline. The latest Marvel whatever or a remake of some 90's blockbuster may suffer a slowdown or even get cancelled due to the societal changes - as well as how movies will need to be made - in at least the intermediate term IMO.

Even if the product is produced and released with Dolby Atmos (or DTS: X), the concern is that the dynamics, the surround "intensity," and bass output will continue to be neutered and maybe even more than it can be now because there will be little or no use for pro auditorium mixing and studios will feel that high end home theater systems are not important (if traditional commercial distribution grinds to a crawl or has a final death rattle), where immersive audio of any merit may indeed be mostly a marketing thing like IMAX Enhanced and non existent. Plus, there goes lossless audio.
 

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Same. After having watched a lot of atmos content, I still didn't get this feeling of getting surrounded especially during these scenes. I always used to think it was due to my setup with only 2 overhead speakers that none of them took advantage of. What really surprised me was the way DTS:X content sounded overall. I watched bourne trilogy and throughout most of the movies, I really felt like I was in the middle of the city with vehicle movements and ambient noise was all over me. This was even clearly felt during chase sequences. Also for atmos movies, I had to bump my overhead speakers by 2 or 3 db, but it wasn't necessary for DTS:X.

I'm planning to watch the entire harry potter collection with dts:x audio as I heard good things about that too. :)

On a 7.1.4 or smaller system the different in Dolby Atmos or DTS: X is all down to the quality of the mix itself, not the immersive format the movie is encoded in.
 

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Thank you for thorough explanation. It makes sense to me.
... It can pan through up to 34 channels. Hence, Atmos.
But here you are referring to the channels of the rendering system (available power amps and speakers) and not the channels of encoding in transport stream, right? That is where usage of term "channel" gets confusing.
A couple of short overhead flybys or a helicopter taking off and cars that drive off-screen, but seem to audibly disappear before the barely make it to the side surround as if they've already driven a mile away seem to be all too common, IMO.
Now that you mention helicopters (and not rain) - I have always had a weird suspicion about the new Dolby Upmixer. I watch my cable-tv on the Dolby Surround setting, as my TV provider only sends two channels. Most of the Hollywood movies seem to be encoded to ProLogic, still. So I get a good old 4.0 sound out of it. But any time there is a helicopter or rain sound, the upmixer knows to lift it to height channels. Is it in my head, or does the Dolby upmixer really recognise some common "coming from above" sounds, like helicopters, jets and rain?
 

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On a 7.1.4 or smaller system the different in Dolby Atmos or DTS: X is all down to the quality of the mix itself, not the immersive format the movie is encoded in.

That is true, but with the way DTS:X works, I think my system is getting benefitted a lot. Here's batpig's detailed explanation about how both the formats work:

https://www.avsforum.com/forum/90-receivers-amps-processors/2309010-dts-x-142.html#post59544848


Because of the phantom imaging DTS:X creates, it treats as if I have rear height speakers too (even though I only have 2 overheads and only if I set them to Top Front). And that's the reason why I could hear sound from the top a lot and why it really gave me an impression that it was more immersive than Atmos.
 

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4k non Dolby lossless DSU vs 4k streaming lossy atmos

What would be considered better when watching marvel movies like Gaurdians of the Galaxy 1 if I have the original 4k LOSSLESS blueray that doesn’t have atmos but can be upmixed on my 5.1.4 with DSU VS me streaming the newer Dolby atmos version of the movie on my Apple TV through Disney Plus that would be LOSSY but formally atmos..?
 

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What would be considered better when watching marvel movies like Gaurdians of the Galaxy 1 if I have the original 4k LOSSLESS blueray that doesn’t have atmos but can be upmixed on my 5.1.4 with DSU VS me streaming the newer Dolby atmos version of the movie on my Apple TV through Disney Plus that would be LOSSY but formally atmos..?

The 4K Blu-ray of Guardians of the Galaxy should have Atmos according to Blu-ray.com https://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Guardians-of-the-Galaxy-4K-Blu-ray/245549/

Regardless you should compare both the streamed version and your disc and see which you prefer. I am currently watching the Marvel movies in order with my kids and I own a number of the films on regular Blu-ray or 4K Blu-ray or even a few 3D Blu-Rays. I also have a Disney Plus subscription and an Apple TV 4K. So far I am not terribly impressed with the streamed Atmos but I would still stream it over my regular Blu-Rays. The 4K discs are still the best but are still not as dynamic as they could have been. Lots of complaints about the “Atmouse” mixes from Disney.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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What would be considered better when watching marvel movies like Guardians of the Galaxy 1 if I have the original 4k LOSSLESS Blu-ray that doesn’t have atmos but can be upmixed on my 5.1.4 with DSU VS me streaming the newer Dolby atmos version of the movie on my Apple TV through Disney Plus that would be LOSSY but formally atmos..?

Your Samsung 4k player (I do recommend upgrading that thing) may not be setup correctly. Make sure you have it set to Bitsream (unprocessed), make sure Secondary Audio is OFF, and that Dynamic Range Control is OFF too.



The 4k disc release of Guardians has an Atmos track and so it should decode in Atmos on a compatible receiver or pre-amp/processor and with the correct overhead speakers (four or more is recommended).


Lossless Atmos or DTS: X is always preferable to lossy audio via streaming.



However, as mentioned above, many Disney Atmos tracks are less than stellar for a variety of reasons compared to other studios' efforts in regards to immersive surround.
 

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Question about Atmos surround speaker height.

Why does Dolby list average floor to ear height of 45" ? I looked at the seats I have ordered, which are fairly typical theater seats (Seatcraft Equinox), and they list floor to cushion = 21.5". The average bum to eye/ear height in males is 31.5" (googled anthroprometric data). So this puts your ears 53" off the floor (not 45").

Since Atmos surrounds should be equal to ear height (Trinnov actually recommends 12" above ear height), my required speaker height seems to be considerably higher than the usual recommendations.
 

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What would be considered better when watching marvel movies like Gaurdians of the Galaxy 1 if I have the original 4k LOSSLESS blueray that doesn’t have atmos but can be upmixed on my 5.1.4 with DSU VS me streaming the newer Dolby atmos version of the movie on my Apple TV through Disney Plus that would be LOSSY but formally atmos..?
Mixes can change when they do new Atmos versions and given Disney's reputation for making wimpy soundtracks that seem to be made for sound bars and TV speakers lately, it's always possible an older 5.1/7.1 soundtrack will sound miles better than a new Atmos mix (e.g. Tron: Legacy's 7.1 mix was excellent; it wouldn't take much for them to screw it up if they remixed for Atmos). It's also possible it won't be any worse or might even be better. It also comes down to who is doing the mix and whether it's approved. Beyond that, streaming and lossless should (but don't always) sound virtually identical as long as the streaming version's bitrate is high enough and they haven't screwed with something along the way (compression is common on cable VOD etc.). It's an audiophile myth that lossless always equals better. Throw enough bits at a JPEG even and it will look good and audio codecs are far superior at retaining quality audio than JPEG is with video. Sites like Netflix that used really low bitrates gave the 'lossy' codecs bad reputations.
 

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What would be considered better when watching marvel movies like Guardians of the Galaxy 1 if I have the original 4k LOSSLESS Blu-ray that doesn’️t have atmos but can be upmixed on my 5.1.4 with DSU VS me streaming the newer Dolby atmos version of the movie on my Apple TV through Disney Plus that would be LOSSY but formally atmos..?

Your Samsung 4k player (I do recommend upgrading that thing) may not be setup correctly. Make sure you have it set to Bitsream (unprocessed), make sure Secondary Audio is OFF, and that Dynamic Range Control is OFF too.



The 4k disc release of Guardians has an Atmos track and so it should decode in Atmos on a compatible receiver or pre-amp/processor and with the correct overhead speakers (four or more is recommended).


Lossless Atmos or DTS: X is always preferable to lossy audio via streaming.



However, as mentioned above, many Disney Atmos tracks are less than stellar for a variety of reasons compared to other studios' efforts in regards to immersive surround.
Sorry I don’t use the Samsung I use an Xbox x for blu rays now
 

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.... Beyond that, streaming and lossless should (but don't always) sound virtually identical as long as the streaming version's bitrate is high enough and they haven't screwed with something along the way (compression is common on cable VOD etc.). It's an audiophile myth that lossless always equals better. Throw enough bits at a JPEG even and it will look good and audio codecs are far superior at retaining quality audio than JPEG is with video.
I have learned that is much much much important the kind of mix/master of the soundtrack/music album than the codec format and resolution.

CD resolution 16/44,1 is enough to give the good sound quality. DAC restores the "complete" analogue signal at least as far a human ear can detect.

But Hires had to sell and they started to make different masters for either CD or Hirez new formats. Of course the Hires sounded better, because the master was better, without compression, weird equalisation, etc.

I remember long time ago when I was listening MP3 and it sounded better for me than the Hires DVD-A in a medium quality Sound equipment. It was the same song but, of course, different master. In that case you are not comparing apples with apples.
 

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Sorry I don’t use the Samsung I use an Xbox x for blu rays now

Turn off Dolby Digital Dynamic Range Control


Let My Receiver Decode Audio (that should be enabled).





The Xbox X has been a notoriously bad 4k Blu-ray player. FYI.
 

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I have learned that is much much much important the kind of mix/master of the soundtrack/music album than the codec format and resolution.

CD resolution 16/44,1 is enough to give the good sound quality. DAC restores the "complete" analogue signal at least as far a human ear can detect.

But Hires had to sell and they started to make different masters for either CD or Hirez new formats. Of course the Hires sounded better, because the master was better, without compression, weird equalisation, etc.

I remember long time ago when I was listening MP3 and it sounded better for me than the Hires DVD-A in a medium quality Sound equipment. It was the same song but, of course, different master. In that case you are not comparing apples with apples.
That's it, exactly. Scientifically speaking, it's not hard to prove there's no sonic benefit beyond 18-bit @48kHz on the playback side. There's good reason on the recording side and it's called headroom, which is particularly great to avoid clipping.

You see arguments about brick wall filters on the sampling side, but oversampling solved that early on. Then came jitter, which was blamed for all the evils of mankind. DACs today at very advanced and yet the myths that digital audio "sucks" persists in some circles even today with scant evidence to prove a word of it (DBX double blind testing can wipe out any doubt, but it's rarely used by the people making the claims as it tends to debunk the claims on proper testing like recording an LP to digital form with levels matched and seeing if someone can tell it from the live signal).

But when you try to explain to some that Redbook CD audio is more than sufficient for 99.9% of all music recordings they won't believe you even though most recordings don't even come close to the technical limits.

The real problems with audio are on the recording and mastering stages. Compression (not lossy compression, but dynamic range compression) is used in digital to the nth degree to make it louder with almost no dynamic range and people blame digital for the sound instead of the executives that demand the abuse of the signals.

Meanwhile lossy codecs were designed to save space, but I don't think many people appreciate how much effort went into something like the AAC codec to make it as transparent as possible, but even when it's near perfect at a mere 256kbps (128 per channel) people will use lower rates to save even more space and then the complaints lead to the notion it sucks. Add to that the industry will promote anything that might sell more product and suddenly "lossless" is the best thing ever even if there's no audible improvement whatsoever, once again leading some people to automatically conclude some bad soundtracks are the result of streaming lossy codecs rather than crappy mixes (Disney).
 

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Sorry I don’️t use the Samsung I use an Xbox x for blu rays now

Turn off Dolby Digital Dynamic Range Control


Let My Receiver Decode Audio (that should be enabled).





The Xbox X has been a notoriously bad 4k Blu-ray player. FYI.
Just curious, what makes the Xbox x “bad” at being a blu rah player? Does it do something to not play the 4k or HDR or atmos that’s on the disc properly?
 

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Sorry I don’️t use the Samsung I use an Xbox x for blu rays now

Turn off Dolby Digital Dynamic Range Control


Let My Receiver Decode Audio (that should be enabled).





The Xbox X has been a notoriously bad 4k Blu-ray player. FYI.
Just curious, what makes the Xbox x “bad” at being a blu rah player? Does it do something to not play the 4k or HDR or atmos that’s on the disc properly?
The Xbox X has been known to fudge with video signals such as screwing up HDR and has had other compatibility issues with certain discs. Given that no current 4k player is perfect, it's been a more unstable disc platform than others.
 

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Sorry I don’️t use the Samsung I use an Xbox x for blu rays now

Turn off Dolby Digital Dynamic Range Control


Let My Receiver Decode Audio (that should be enabled).





The Xbox X has been a notoriously bad 4k Blu-ray player. FYI.
Just curious, what makes the Xbox x “bad” at being a blu rah player? Does it do something to not play the 4k or HDR or atmos that’s on the disc properly?
The Xbox X has been known to fudge with video signals such as screwing up HDR and has had other compatibility issues with certain discs. Given that no current 4k player is perfect, it's been a more unstable disc platform than others.
Good to know. I must have gotten lucky with mine-I have about 50 blu rays mostly 4k and haven’t had any issues.
 
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