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I saw something that eARC compresses lossless audio over HDMI to your receiver or SSP. Is this true? I don't use eARC but thought I would mention and ask here if anyone knows?
 

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From the same WhatHiFi article:


There’s scope for eARC to deliver up to 32 channels of audio, including eight-channel, 24bit/192kHz uncompressed data streams at speeds of up to 38Mbps.
 

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So eArc now is compressed but they plan to have eight channel 192-24 in the future? All broadcast video is no higher than 48k so why would they do that? And will current HDMI eARC capable cards be capable of accepting the uncompressed audio with a software upgrade?
 

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My understanding is that is compressed but extended ARC allows for much greater bandwidth as a result of HDMI 2.1

"Enhanced Audio Return Channel (also known as eARC) is the next generation of ARC. It’s a feature implemented in the most recent HDMI 2.1 specification.


The main benefit of eARC is a big boost in bandwidth and speed. This allows you to send higher-quality audio from your TV to a soundbar or AV receiver.


There’s scope for eARC to deliver up to 32 channels of audio, including eight-channel, 24bit/192kHz uncompressed data streams at speeds of up to 38Mbps.


This means all those high bitrate formats currently available on Blu-ray discs, 4K Blu-rays and some streaming services – Dolby TrueHD, DTS-HD Master Audio and object-based formats such as Dolby Atmos and DTS:X – will all be compatible.


But whether manufacturers choose to support them all remains to be seen.

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On paper, HDMI eARC should also make the handshake between compatible devices much smoother and negate the need to activate HDMI CEC (which doesn’t always work properly) - so operating multiple products shouldn’t require any extra steps to get things up and running.


As is the case with ARC, you’ll need two devices with compatible HDMI eARC sockets for the protocol to work. This means they need to meet the HDMI 2.1 standard but, at the time of writing, there is only a handful of products carrying HDMI 2.1 currently on the market.


The first 4K TVs to sport HDMI 2.1 inputs emerged from LG in 2019. All of LG's 2020 OLED TVs are HDMI 2.1 certified too, but it's a very mixed bag where other TV manufacturers and their TV ranges are concerned."
 

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A new new HDMI card or just the new HDMI card that went into my unit with the CB V upgrade? I believe mine to be the latest they have. John said it used HDMI 2.0b. I had thought eARC (as opposed to ARC) was implemented as part of the HDMI 2.1 standard:

From WhatHiFi: "
Enhanced Audio Return Channel (also known as eARC) is the next generation of ARC. It’s a feature implemented in the most recent HDMI 2.1 specification."

but I note the text in the data sheet from MDS. That said, I can't see a reason why I'd ever need it. My display isn't going to act a source device for my CB.
A new card specifically with eARC, not the one you have. In testing a few months back. I don't think it's shipping yet. No I don't really need it but some will.
 

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I have been keeping up with Audiosciencereview measurements of pre-pros. Looks like you still do need both dac upgrades and software upgrades😉. Theta reigns supreme on the hardware side and has several generations of dac cards. It’s something that the very first now 20 years old Theta dacs match what some are selling for mega bucks now. Nothing is close to the Xtreme D-3 dacs on the market. Being able to slave Gen 8 dacs to Casablanca is just decades ahead of what the completion can do. Nell Sinclair was a visionary.
 
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