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Don't rip me apart here but there's a lot more to what makes a great projector than going really black and just because JVCs going blacker than everything else doesn't mean that makes them automatically better than the rest.
It doesn't mean it's automatically the 'best' for every situation, no-one ever said that.

However, when all things are balanced out, the overwhelming majority of people in the shootouts, the online reviews, the experts seem to favor the JVC generally speaking.

In the reverse, I could say just because you prefer a specific tech or projector does not mean that a different projector might not be a better fit for the majority.



The argument of what is best is a logical fallacy in itself, because there are differing methods of coming to the conclusion of what is best.

However, given X-Y-Z factors and applying a general formula of what 'the consensus' states, you'd be hard pressed to argue that they don't generally prefer a JVC.



Sure, not always (no-one said that), but generally.



So your argument, although maybe with the best of intentions, does not really make sense to the majority.



If you were trying to pick out a toy for a 6-year old, and 80% of the toy reviewers around that age recommended a specific toy, you'd have a lesser chance of being wrong picking the toy out than you would if you went with the 20% opinion.
The word majority needs qualifying here I think.

The 'majority' to me, is not those who frequent here.

We are a minority in the eyes of most.

I know of only one other person in my life (and yes, I know more than three people ;) ) who even remotely shares my passion for home AV kit. Literally everyone else I know could not care less about what is minutely better than the next thing as long as they are happy that they have got a decent picture for the money paid.



Not sure that is relevant as it sort of shows 'following the herd' syndrome. Go by what the child actually wants and enjoys, not simply by what is viewed as the best by those you don't know.


 

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ABSOLUTE ULTIMATE AV
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I'm going to move this to here and answer this here because this is the thread where it is most relevant...

Good day!
About what advantage JVC before Sony on 0% -1,5% you speak?
This is the advantage that somehow magically arose after your last measurements of N9?






Explain, please, how did it happen that JVC doubled the contrast by 1% ???
On any device, the dynamic aperture does not double by 1%, and your previous measurements did not!
And then suddenly the magic!
The first set of measurements were with respect to Firmware V1.17, which was the original launch firmware that had a bug wherein the Dynamic Iris (DI) was malfunctioning.

JVC quickly issued a new Firmware V1.18 which fixed the malfunctioning DI that as a consequence significantly altered the contrast profile of the projector in particular with respect to the range 0% ADL - 2% ADL as is demonstrated by my subsequent second set of measurements, which correspond to the performance of the projector with the new Firmware V1.18

Any questions? :)

:wink:
 

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@ARROW-AV I just looked at the screen shot (995 vs. NX9, dynamic) compare for Interstellar. Do you know how the Sony was set up gamma wise? Was it one of the stock curves or was it adjusted? Thanks.
 

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ABSOLUTE ULTIMATE AV
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Discussion Starter #1,205 (Edited)
@ARROW-AV I just looked at the screen shot (995 vs. NX9, dynamic) compare for Interstellar. Do you know how the Sony was set up gamma wise? Was it one of the stock curves or was it adjusted? Thanks.
Since the INTERSTELLAR version used for this testing is the SDR version not the HDR version (which has an elevated black floor encoded) both the JVC and SONY were calibrated to and operating as flat 2.4 gamma, meaning that the gamma profiles were identical

Incidentally, the JVC RS3000/NX9 is not fully black with this test, but it is significantly blacker as compared with the SONY 995ES/870ES. And because the dynamic range is very considerably greater the luminance of the highlights, namely the stars and space station) is a lot brighter.

The result is hardly surprising given the JVC RS3000/NX9 measures circa 220,000:1 peak ON/OFF contrast and the SONY 995ES/870ES is only circa 24,000:1... that's over 9 times better ON/OFF contrast performance... Hell, even the JVC's NATIVE ON/OFF contrast performance beats the SONY's maximum dynamic ON/OFF contrast performance.

:wink:
 

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I'm going to move this to here and answer this here because this is the thread where it is most relevant...



The first set of measurements were with respect to Firmware V1.17, which was the original launch firmware that had a bug wherein the Dynamic Iris (DI) was malfunctioning.

JVC quickly issued a new Firmware V1.18 which fixed the malfunctioning DI that as a consequence significantly altered the contrast profile of the projector in particular with respect to the range 0% ADL - 2% ADL as is demonstrated by my subsequent second set of measurements, which correspond to the performance of the projector with the new Firmware V1.18

Any questions? :)

:wink:
Yes, questions remain, and there are more of them ...
In the second sample, the ANSI became much worse, and the on\off was 5,000 units. So how did they get more native contrast by 1%, 6200: 1 versus 6500: 1 ??? According to all the laws of physics, he had to fall! You do not have ... It is also corrected JVC firmware?

Show at least one device in which the work of a dynamic diaphragm is capable of triple the contrast by 1%?
The operation of the dynamic aperture can have a noticeable effect up to 0.25%, up to a maximum of 0.5%.

But the most interesting thing is that you yourself publish measurements of white balance with photos and results in the JVC branch, from which it follows that it is impossible to use a dynamic aperture!





So on the basis of what you put fake figure in the JVC chart?
Based on what do you distribute this schedule in all branches of the forum?
Based on what do you claim that JVC greatly exceeds Sony by up to 1.5%, while in reality does Sony already have a twofold advantage by 1%?
 

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The business of building cars is profitable for them and in the quarters where that was their primary focus they have been profitable. They are also rapidly scaling manufacturing and distribution and as they have done so the capital expenses for those efforts have drawn them into the red but these are front-loaded costs and not an ongoing issue.

Tesla also has range, charging infrastructure, and proven battery chemistry which are much more important to me than 0-60 time or lateral Gs. It is is wholly impractical to take any other brand of EV beyond 50% of it's effective range (you'll need the other 50% to get back home).

I'm sure some day there will be cars that compete on these factors and others but today nothing comes close to a Tesla on any measure but price.

Back to projectors though, while sterile measurements are not the end-all be-all, I think you can still judge whether you'll be happy with a given projector based on the measurements and feedback of others, assuming you have some prior experience with projectors to draw from. It's not often possible to see projectors in person. There are fewer and fewer AV stores around that carry multiple brands and if I wanted to see the projector I bought a few months ago in a store I'd still be waiting for the opportunity. As it was I had to preorder it in September to get it as soon as I did, based on *speculation* of the measurements.
I understand that the forthcoming JVC/Tesla joint project will still require recharging on long trips, but will have great native contrast and black levels.
 

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ABSOLUTE ULTIMATE AV
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Discussion Starter #1,208 (Edited)
Yes, questions remain, and there are more of them ...
In the second sample, the ANSI became much worse, and the on\off was 5,000 units. So how did they get more native contrast by 1%, 6200: 1 versus 6500: 1 ??? According to all the laws of physics, he had to fall! You do not have ... It is also corrected JVC firmware?

Show at least one device in which the work of a dynamic diaphragm is capable of triple the contrast by 1%?
The operation of the dynamic aperture can have a noticeable effect up to 0.25%, up to a maximum of 0.5%.

But the most interesting thing is that you yourself publish measurements of white balance with photos and results in the JVC branch, from which it follows that it is impossible to use a dynamic aperture!




So on the basis of what you put fake figure in the JVC chart?
Based on what do you distribute this schedule in all branches of the forum?
Based on what do you claim that JVC greatly exceeds Sony by up to 1.5%, while in reality does Sony already have a twofold advantage by 1%?

.
 

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Yes, questions remain, and there are more of them ...
In the second sample, the ANSI became much worse, and the on\off was 5,000 units. So how did they get more native contrast by 1%, 6200: 1 versus 6500: 1 ??? According to all the laws of physics, he had to fall! You do not have ... It is also corrected JVC firmware?

Show at least one device in which the work of a dynamic diaphragm is capable of triple the contrast by 1%?
The operation of the dynamic aperture can have a noticeable effect up to 0.25%, up to a maximum of 0.5%.

But the most interesting thing is that you yourself publish measurements of white balance with photos and results in the JVC branch, from which it follows that it is impossible to use a dynamic aperture!





So on the basis of what you put fake figure in the JVC chart?
Based on what do you distribute this schedule in all branches of the forum?
Based on what do you claim that JVC greatly exceeds Sony by up to 1.5%, while in reality does Sony already have a twofold advantage by 1%?
I appreciate that English isn't your first language, but it's difficult to decipher what you mean here, unfortunately.

So, your questions seem to be:

1 - How did the native contrast change? (I believe this is a different physical machine)
2 - You challenge the possibility of a dynamic iris to have an effect at 1% ADL? Particularly triple the native contrast.
3 - You claim that we shouldn't use the contrast figure from dynamic auto 1 / 2 because of the yellowing issue?

Is that right?
 

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I appreciate that English isn't your first language, but it's difficult to decipher what you mean here, unfortunately.

So, your questions seem to be:

1 - How did the native contrast change? (I believe this is a different physical machine)
2 - You challenge the possibility of a dynamic iris to have an effect at 1% ADL? Particularly triple the native contrast.
3 - You claim that we shouldn't use the contrast figure from dynamic auto 1 / 2 because of the yellowing issue?

Is that right?
Yes, sorry for my bad english.

You understood correctly.

1. The graph depends on the values of on \ off and ANSI, for the second sample they are much worse.
2. Yes, the dynamic aperture is not able to triple the contrast by 1%.
3. You can not assume the value of contrast at 1% equal to 15 000: 1 if it can not be used due to yellowing!
 

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Discussion Starter #1,212 (Edited)
Yes, sorry for my bad english.

You understood correctly.

1. The graph depends on the values of on \ off and ANSI, for the second sample they are much worse.
2. Yes, the dynamic aperture is not able to triple the contrast by 1%.
3. You can not assume the value of contrast at 1% equal to 15 000: 1 if it can not be used due to yellowing!
OK I will play ball... I figured you for a troll, however I will give you the benefit of the doubt... Word of advice though , if you want someone to answer your questions then don't falsely accuse them of fabricating charts or figures, OK? :)

You cannot compare the two sets of measurements and corresponding charts, as this is akin to comparing apples versus oranges. Different firmware, different settings, and different units.

Those are all 100% accurate measurements. You are most welcome to visit me here and I can easily replicate them for you. I live only circa 20 minutes from London Heathrow and Luton International airports. PM me if you'd like to visit wherein you can see for yourself the comparative performances of the projectors and I can take you through and show you the respective measurements.

Your statement regarding dynamic contrast functionality not being able to triple the contrast is incorrect. There are a considerable number of projectors wherein the dynamic contrast multiplier measures upwards of 300%, including almost all pre-existing JVC projectors that feature it. The SIM HDR DUO PLUS is another example, wherein the dynamic contrast multiplier measures x4.6 at 0% ADL (ON/OFF) and x3.9 at 1% ADL. Furthermore, JVC THEMSELVES claim a dynamic contrast multiplier for these projectors of not just x3 but in fact x10... which you will be able to see very clearly from the JVC marketing information. In reality, it does not measure that high when we are talking calibrated etc.

Here is some comparison data for the JVC RS3000/NX9 vs SONY 995/870ES vs SIM2 HDR DUO PLUS vs CHRISTIE 'ULTIMATE' PROJECTOR:





This is specifically with respect to all projectors calibrated and operating HDR as opposed to SDR performance, meaning that the JVC has its iris wide open and is operating high lamp, with the BT.2020 color filter enabled.

As you can see the SONY and the JVC crossover at circa 1.5% ADL above which the SONY outperforms the JVC.

I will also be measuring and posting the full range of contrast measurements comparing the SONY and JVC with respect to SDR performance shortly, as well.

I will answer your question regarding the DI yellowing next...

:wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #1,213 (Edited)
But the most interesting thing is that you yourself publish measurements of white balance with photos and results in the JVC branch, from which it follows that it is impossible to use a dynamic aperture!

IMG

IMG
3. You can not assume the value of contrast at 1% equal to 15 000: 1 if it can not be used due to yellowing!
You have quoted that photo of mine and accompanying RGB balance measurement out of context.

Please read my WHOLE post please, which you can find HERE: https://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-digital-hi-end-projectors-3-000-usd-msrp/3038288-official-jvc-rs3000-nx9-jvc-rs2000-nx7-n7-jvc-rs1000-nx5-n5-owners-thread-103.html#post57941060

AND here it is quoted in full (click 'SHOW' SPOILERS to read):

OK folks, here we go... Let's call this In-Depth Investigation Round 1 :)

I have carried out a load of testing including measurements to find out what the hell is going on, using a brand new JVC RS3000/NX9, March 2019 build, with firmware 2.04; and here's what I have discovered.

Using a 1% ADL test pattern I succeeded in replicating the DI yellowing that has been reported by some of you fine gentlemen; wherein, this is SDR - IRIS 0 - HIGH LAMP - WITHOUT DI:



And this is the corresponding measurement of the white, where I had accurately calibrated the projector hence the perfect white balance:



But this is what happens when the DI is enabled, being SDR - IRIS 0 - HIGH LAMP - WITH DI ENABLED:



As you can see there is very noticable yellowing when the DI is enabled.

Switching between AUTO1 and AUTO2 there is absolutely no noticable difference. The yellowing is exactly the same, as is shown by the respective measurements.

This is SDR - IRIS 0 - HIGH LAMP - WITH DI SET TO AUTO1:



And this is SDR - IRIS 0 - HIGH LAMP - WITH DI SET TO AUTO2:



Therefore, from this we can conclude that there really is absolutely no difference between AUTO1 and AUTO2 settings for the DI with respect to this phenomenon.

Interestingly, although the appearance is yellowing there is in fact more green push than red; and the overall shift is very significant, skewing the white balance completely out of whack to 17.4% dE inaccuracy. Not good.

So then I measured the same, but with respect to LOW LAMP instead of HIGH LAMP, and here are the results... Firstly, SDR - IRIS 0 - LOW LAMP - WITHOUT DI: where again I accurately calibrated this so perfect grayscale:



And then SDR - IRIS 0 - LOW LAMP - WITH DI ENABLED:



Hence, LOW LAMP is very similar to HIGH LAMP in this regard, with slightly less red push than HIGH LAMP, but skewing the white balance to 18% dE inaccuracy; so very similar.


Being solution oriented I then went about evaluating what settings changes improves the issue. In short, I tried absolutely everything, and the only thing that makes a difference is closing down the lamp iris. So, I investigated including measurements with respect to what's what in this regard and here are the results:

IRIS 7 - SDR - WITH DI ENABLED:




IRIS 8 - SDR - WITH DI ENABLED:




IRIS 9 - SDR - WITH DI ENABLED:




IRIS 10 - SDR - WITH DI ENABLED:



Therefore, closing down the IRIS does improve matters, wherein the dE inaccuracy improves from 17.4 dE to 16.4 dE (IRIS 7), 14.0 dE (IRIS 8), 10.8 dE (IRIS 9), and 5.0 dE (IRIS 10). Where I consider 5.0 dE to be acceptable, in that this will no longer look yellow, but white, as you can yourself see here in this photo of SDR - IRIS 10 - WITH DI ENABLED:



Looks considerably better than THIS doesn't it?:



Consequently, the good news is that as far as SDR is concerned, there is a workaround, namely set the LAMP IRIS to 10 - 15 and you won't be seeing any DI yellowing :)

Serendipitously, in setting up the projector to achieve 14 - 18 fL peak image luminance with SDR I would be setting the LAMP IRIS to within this range anyway.

Either way, I consider this to be good news, because it means that with SDR one can most certainly use the DI and avoid the DI yellowing issue by simply setting the LAMP IRIS to 10 - 15 before enabling the DI by setting it to either AUTO1 or AUTO2.

Of course, I will need to confirm that other units behave the same way as this one, where as it just so happens I have a second brand new JVC RS3000/NX9 here which I will shortly similarly evaluate and will confirm back whether or not it does indeed behave the same way.

OK, that's SDR, so let's move onto HDR :)

Well, here's where things get even more interesting...

...Because here's LUCY:

HDR - IRIS 0 - WITHOUT DI:




HDR - IRIS 0 - WITH DI ENABLED:



And here's the corresponding measurements of the white:

WITHOUT DI:



WITH DI ENABLED:



Yup. NO YELLOWING ! In fact, there's no significant skewing of the white balance whatsoever :)

Digging deeper, here's what happens with 1% ADL:

HDR - 1% ADL - IRIS 0 - WITHOUT DI ENABLED:






HDR - 1% ADL - IRIS 0 - WITH DI ENABLED:





So, with 1% ADL with the IRIS set to 0 wide open there is some color shift, but it's nothing like as bad as with SDR, being only circa 8% dE inaccuracy as compared with SDR's circa 18% dE. Also, interestingly the shift is not towards YELLOW but towards CYAN, the consequence of which is that it is far less noticable, as you can clearly see from the photo above of HDR - 1% ADL - IRIS 0 - WITH DI ENABLED

Strangely, when closing down the LAMP IRIS, unlike with SDR, this color shift remains essentially constant until when then IRIS is set to 10 or higher.

Here's IRIS 9:




And here's IRIS 10:



Wherein, it drops below 5 dE inaccuracy at IRIS 10 the same as with SDR.

Therefore, with HDR, with torture test content such as LUCY, there is absolutely zero colour shifting. With 1% ADL test patterns there is some colour shifting but towards CYAN, not YELLOW, and comparatively only slightly to the extent that I think most people would be hard pressed to notice it. This can be improved by closing the LAMP IRIS down to 10, however, because we need higher light output with HDR I can’t see many people actually doing this. All things considered, personally I would choose to leave the IRIS wide open set to 0 and live with the slight CYAN push of only 8% dE in the rare instances that it actually manifests.

So that’s the what’s what in this regard with respect to this particular JVC RS3000/NX9 unit. Like I said, I will check out another unit and see how the performance compares and will report back my findings. I also have two shiny new JVC RS1000/N5s here as well and I will test these as well.

:wink:

In short, THERE IS NO SUCH YELLOWING with my settings for this JVC RS3000/NX9, so using the Dynamic Contrast functionality is absolutely fine :)

That photo of mine and accompanying RGB balance measurement, as stated very clearly in my aforementioned post, correspond to SDR - IRIS 0 - HIGH LAMP - WITH DI ENABLED, which is firstly SDR, not HDR, wherein the my measurements in the latter table and chart are with respect to HDR, AND that is NOT having the projector properly set up for SDR, namely calibrated to 14 fL white level.

When the projector is operating HDR whilst using the BT.2020 color filter there is no such yellowing, as demonstrated in my aforementioned post, but only a mild cyan push which is hardly noticeable and certainly does not negate the ability to use the Dynamic Contrast functionality.

Speaking of which, even WITH the yellowing occurring, such as if/when you operate SDR with the iris opened more than -10, this does not stop you using the dynamic contrast. It's a video artefact, nothing more, nothing less. There exists only one projector to date that I am aware of which does not produce any visible dynamic contrast artefacts. So video artefacts with dynamic contrast functionality are commonplace. This can include gamma crush, pumping, erroneous full-fade-to-black, and chroma shift. Many people choose to use whatever projector's dynamic contrast functionality in spite of associated video artefacts; some others do not and turn it off. So you cannot make a sweeping statement that you cannot use it because of the yellowing artefact. Where the fact of the matter is that this occurs both rarely and briefly even when the projector is setup such that it manifests, wherein with my settings with this projector it does not actually manifest.

Finally, I am just guessing here, but you don't happen to personally own a SONY projector do you, by any chance?

:wink:
 

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OK I will play ball... I figured you for a troll, however I will give you the benefit of the doubt... Word of advice though , if you want someone to answer your questions then don't falsely accuse them of fabricating charts or figures, OK? :)

You cannot compare the two sets of measurements and corresponding charts, as this is akin to comparing apples versus oranges. Different firmware, different settings, and different units.

Those are all 100% accurate measurements. You are most welcome to visit me here and I can easily replicate them for you. I live only circa 20 minutes from London Heathrow and Luton International airports. PM me if you'd like to visit wherein you can see for yourself the comparative performances of the projectors and I can take you through and show you the respective measurements.

Your statement regarding dynamic contrast functionality not being able to triple the contrast is incorrect. There are a considerable number of projectors wherein the dynamic contrast multiplier measures upwards of 300%, including almost all pre-existing JVC projectors that feature it. The SIM HDR DUO PLUS is another example, wherein the dynamic contrast multiplier measures x4.6 at 0% ADL (ON/OFF) and x3.9 at 1% ADL. Furthermore, JVC THEMSELVES claim a dynamic contrast multiplier for these projectors of not just x3 but in fact x10... which you will be able to see very clearly from the JVC marketing information. In reality, it does not measure that high when we are talking calibrated etc.

Here is some comparison data for the JVC RS3000/NX9 vs SONY 995/870ES vs SIM2 HDR DUO PLUS vs CHRISTIE 'ULTIMATE' PROJECTOR:





This is specifically with respect to all projectors calibrated and operating HDR as opposed to SDR performance, meaning that the JVC has its iris wide open and is operating high lamp, with the BT.2020 color filter enabled.

As you can see the SONY and the JVC crossover at circa 1.5% ADL above which the SONY outperforms the JVC.

I will also be measuring and posting the full range of contrast measurements comparing the SONY and JVC with respect to SDR performance shortly, as well.

I will answer your question regarding the DI yellowing next...

:wink:

Thank you for your responses.

But the comparison with Sim is incorrect, it uses two projectors.
We are talking about the traditional dynamic aperture, which blocks the light path.
The JVC line X did not have such an ability, the N9, too, and suddenly the tripling of the contrast occurred, and this with a significant drop in ANSI.
 

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You have quoted that photo of mine and accompanying RGB balance measurement out of context.

Please read my WHOLE post please, which you can find HERE: https://www.avsforum.com/forum/24-digital-hi-end-projectors-3-000-usd-msrp/3038288-official-jvc-rs3000-nx9-jvc-rs2000-nx7-n7-jvc-rs1000-nx5-n5-owners-thread-103.html#post57941060

AND here it is quoted in full (click 'SHOW' SPOILERS to read):


In short, THERE IS NO SUCH YELLOWING with my settings for this JVC RS3000/NX9, so using the Dynamic Contrast functionality is absolutely fine :)

That photo of mine and accompanying RGB balance measurement, as stated very clearly in my aforementioned post, correspond to SDR - IRIS 0 - HIGH LAMP - WITH DI ENABLED, which is firstly SDR, not HDR, wherein the my measurements in the latter table and chart are with respect to HDR, AND that is NOT having the projector properly set up for SDR, namely calibrated to 14 fL white level.

When the projector is operating HDR whilst using the BT.2020 color filter there is no such yellowing, as demonstrated in my aforementioned post, but only a mild cyan push which is hardly noticeable and certainly does not negate the ability to use the Dynamic Contrast functionality.

Speaking of which, even WITH the yellowing occurring, such as if/when you operate SDR with the iris opened more than -10, this does not stop you using the dynamic contrast. It's a video artefact, nothing more, nothing less. There exists only one projector to date that I am aware of which does not produce any visible dynamic contrast artefacts. So video artefacts with dynamic contrast functionality are commonplace. This can include gamma crush, pumping, erroneous full-fade-to-black, and chroma shift. Many people choose to use whatever projector's dynamic contrast functionality in spite of associated video artefacts; some others do not and turn it off. So you cannot make a sweeping statement that you cannot use it because of the yellowing artefact. Where the fact of the matter is that this occurs both rarely and briefly even when the projector is setup such that it manifests, wherein with my settings with this projector it does not actually manifest.

Finally, I am just guessing here, but you don't happen to personally own a SONY projector do you, by any chance?

:wink:
I am closely following the forum and of course I read the message completely.
You plot the figures obtained on the open aperture, and further suggest using a diaphragm of -10, since there are no artifacts.
And what will happen to the numbers with a value of -10 ?!
ANSI will fall even more, the schedule will drop even more.
What is the brightness at -10? It may not be enough for owners of large screens!
You either forget about it or do it on purpose ...
I do not have a Sony projector, and on the contrary, I owned the JVC X500 and RS420.
 

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I am closely following the forum and of course I read the message completely.
You plot the figures obtained on the open aperture, and further suggest using a diaphragm of -10, since there are no artifacts.
And what will happen to the numbers with a value of -10 ?!
ANSI will fall even more, the schedule will drop even more.
What is the brightness at -10? It may not be enough for owners of large screens!
You either forget about it or do it on purpose ...
I do not have a Sony projector, and on the contrary, I owned the JVC X500 and RS420.
You are referring to a recommendation made for SDR (-10).

The iris full open, and the contrast charts are for HDR. This is what Arrow just explained (and was in his previous posts), also explaining that he didn't experience the yellow shift in this mode with HDR.

SDR data has not been provided yet.

And please, stop accusing people of dishonesty. I'm trying to keep this conversation civil and allow your concerns to be addressed but I don't quite know what you're trying to achieve by implying things like the second part I bolded.
 

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.......In short, THERE IS NO SUCH YELLOWING with my settings for this JVC RS3000/NX9, so using the Dynamic Contrast functionality is absolutely fine :) .................



:wink:

Oh cool, you have “magic settings” too!
 

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Except when you need to go 311 miles or more. For around town driving and short trips, they are a great option.
Driving from Chicago to Phoenix was a piece of cake in my Tesla. stopped every 3-4 hours for a 45 minute break was like when I did it the first time in my car. Plus, the wife steals my car every weekend to leave me with her BMW.
 

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The longest range is 370 miles (600KM).. that's more than my Camry at full tank can go by about 30%...

And this is a red herring.. it's not even an argument... for most people and in most cases, you won't even need to charge your car more than once every few days... for me, that kind of mileage will take me a week or more.. and for all of that time, charging time at home is like charging your phone.. you don't even have to waste time going to a petrol station... and during the times that you might wanna drive cross country, don't tell me you don't have to rest after 600KM? just park at a charging station, stretch your leg, go to the loo, eat something and you're good to go...
Yep, I have to take a break to stretch being in a car at 6'5" is just unbearable after 3-4 hours.
 

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You are referring to a recommendation made for SDR (-10).

The iris full open, and the contrast charts are for HDR. This is what Arrow just explained (and was in his previous posts), also explaining that he didn't experience the yellow shift in this mode with HDR.

SDR data has not been provided yet.

And please, stop accusing people of dishonesty. I'm trying to keep this conversation civil and allow your concerns to be addressed but I don't quite know what you're trying to achieve by implying things like the second part I bolded.
I appreciate your participation, thank you.

I'm trying to understand how the sample with the worst on \ off and ANSI tripled the contrast by 1%!
Are there other examples of this dynamic aperture effect?
On the model number X JVC this was not observed, and on the new 4K models before the last measurements, too ...
 
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